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Nuclear Tests United States

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NEWS
August 2, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
As many as 75,000 people exposed to iodine-131 in fallout from above-ground nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s could develop thyroid cancer as a result, according to data released Friday by the National Cancer Institute. At highest risk are people who were children during the 1950s and who drank milk contaminated with the radioactive iodine.
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NEWS
October 8, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Senate set to begin a long-awaited debate on the comprehensive nuclear test-ban treaty today, widespread predictions that the pact is headed for defeat have focused attention on a key question: Would that set off a new global arms race? Treaty proponents, led by the White House, have warned that a defeat could quickly create a Wild West atmosphere worldwide--with nukes instead of six-shooters.
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NEWS
July 17, 1995 | From Reuters
On the 50th anniversary of the first atomic bomb test, a protester on Sunday threw brown liquid that he called "symbolic blood" at an obelisk marking Ground Zero, 50 years to the minute after the historic explosion. Trinity Site is normally open twice a year to the public in April and October, but visitors were permitted Sunday for the anniversary of the 1945 test. "This is [the] first time we've had protesters," said Jim Eckles, a spokesman for White Sands Missile Range.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
As many as 75,000 people exposed to iodine-131 in fallout from above-ground nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s could develop thyroid cancer as a result, according to data released Friday by the National Cancer Institute. At highest risk are people who were children during the 1950s and who drank milk contaminated with the radioactive iodine.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | Associated Press
The Pentagon has canceled the last underground nuclear test on the drawing board after nearly 1,000 U.S. tests dating back to the birth of the nuclear age half a century ago, an official said Wednesday. George Ullrich, deputy director of the Defense Nuclear Agency, which was in charge of the final test, said his agency decided to cancel it after President Clinton's decision last month to extend a U.S. nuclear test ban until at least September, 1994.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hoping to close the books on a dark episode in U.S. history, federal negotiators are nearing a financial settlement with families of 12 people who were unwitting subjects of radiation experiments during the earliest days of the Atomic Age. Relatives of the victims would get a combined total of $4.8 million a draft agreement with the Department of Energy.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British protesters opposed to nuclear weapons tests broke into the grounds of Buckingham Palace in a dramatic appeal on behalf of American Indians who live near the U.S. underground test site in Nevada. Police said 15 women and two men were arrested after the morning incursion by the Women's Nuclear Test Ban Network. A statement from the group said that it welcomes President Clinton's extension of a nuclear testing moratorium but wants a permanent ban.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Senate set to begin a long-awaited debate on the comprehensive nuclear test-ban treaty today, widespread predictions that the pact is headed for defeat have focused attention on a key question: Would that set off a new global arms race? Treaty proponents, led by the White House, have warned that a defeat could quickly create a Wild West atmosphere worldwide--with nukes instead of six-shooters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1986
Your editorial advocates a negotiated test ban treaty. While I agree that a treaty is better than a moratorium, a moratorium is certainly better than a continuation of nuclear tests. The United States conducted 13 or more tests since the Russians stopped their testing. Any imaginable Russian advantage must have been matched by this series of tests--if there was a Russian advantage, which is highly doubtful, since we still maintain an edge in the sophistication of our weapons. This is a rare moment of opportunity.
NEWS
September 17, 1993 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concerned by intelligence reports suggesting that China may soon conduct a major nuclear test, the Clinton Administration for the past several weeks has conducted an intensive, high-level diplomatic campaign to prevent Beijing from resuming nuclear testing, senior U.S. officials disclosed Thursday.
NEWS
October 25, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hoping to close the books on a dark episode in U.S. history, federal negotiators are nearing a financial settlement with families of 12 people who were unwitting subjects of radiation experiments during the earliest days of the Atomic Age. Relatives of the victims would get a combined total of $4.8 million a draft agreement with the Department of Energy.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | From Reuters
On the 50th anniversary of the first atomic bomb test, a protester on Sunday threw brown liquid that he called "symbolic blood" at an obelisk marking Ground Zero, 50 years to the minute after the historic explosion. Trinity Site is normally open twice a year to the public in April and October, but visitors were permitted Sunday for the anniversary of the 1945 test. "This is [the] first time we've had protesters," said Jim Eckles, a spokesman for White Sands Missile Range.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | Associated Press
The Pentagon has canceled the last underground nuclear test on the drawing board after nearly 1,000 U.S. tests dating back to the birth of the nuclear age half a century ago, an official said Wednesday. George Ullrich, deputy director of the Defense Nuclear Agency, which was in charge of the final test, said his agency decided to cancel it after President Clinton's decision last month to extend a U.S. nuclear test ban until at least September, 1994.
NEWS
July 7, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
British protesters opposed to nuclear weapons tests broke into the grounds of Buckingham Palace in a dramatic appeal on behalf of American Indians who live near the U.S. underground test site in Nevada. Police said 15 women and two men were arrested after the morning incursion by the Women's Nuclear Test Ban Network. A statement from the group said that it welcomes President Clinton's extension of a nuclear testing moratorium but wants a permanent ban.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | DON COOK, Times Staff Writer
The United States and the Soviet Union opened formal negotiations here Monday aimed at working out a system of seismic stations and on-site inspection to monitor nuclear testing under the partial and still unratified test ban treaties of 1974 and 1977. The negotiations are expected to last two weeks and are regarded by the Soviets as a first step toward what Igor Palenykh, a member of the Soviet delegation, said would be "limitation and eventual cessation of nuclear testing." U.S.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Exactly on schedule and under ideal conditions, Soviet and U.S. technicians made history Wednesday by jointly monitoring a nuclear explosion beneath the Nevada Test Site, opening what participants said is a new chapter in nuclear arms control. "This is an auspicious start for the Joint Verification Experiment and a critical hurdle for this process," Energy Undersecretary Joseph F.
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