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Nuclear Weapons England

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NEWS
June 9, 1988 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Four and a half years after the first American medium-range missiles arrived at this sprawling air base amid violent protest and political nervousness, U.S. military officials are preparing to remove them. The first important step in the process could come as early as next month, with the arrival of Soviet inspection teams. Under the terms of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty completed June 1 in Moscow, which calls for the elimination of all U.S.
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NEWS
May 22, 2000 | Reuters
Britain said Sunday that it sees no swift moves toward nuclear disarmament despite a commitment by nuclear powers to scrap their atomic arsenals. Britain and other key nuclear powers agreed at the United Nations on Saturday to give an unequivocal commitment to do away with their atomic weapons, but the pact included no timetable.
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NEWS
September 14, 1999 | Times Wire Services
Britain revealed Monday that it had suspected for half a century that "traitor granny" Melita Norwood was a Soviet spy, but it had never interviewed her because it didn't want to jeopardize other investigations. Home Secretary Jack Straw, under pressure to reveal the facts about Norwood and a second Soviet spy unmasked by defector Vasili Mitrokhin, said he had first learned of her activities in December 1998.
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Documents outlining British plans to develop new nuclear weapons were found on a sidewalk, the Guardian newspaper reported. The documents were dated March 10 and were found near a nuclear weapons factory in the southern town of Aldermaston. They detailed plans to replace warheads on Britain's U.S.-made Trident nuclear submarines. The Defense Ministry called the story "really no great shakes."
NEWS
April 6, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Documents outlining British plans to develop new nuclear weapons were found on a sidewalk, the Guardian newspaper reported. The documents were dated March 10 and were found near a nuclear weapons factory in the southern town of Aldermaston. They detailed plans to replace warheads on Britain's U.S.-made Trident nuclear submarines. The Defense Ministry called the story "really no great shakes."
NEWS
June 6, 1988
British opposition leader Neil Kinnock backed away from Labor's unilateralist defense policy and said he would favor using the Trident missile system as a bargaining chip in East-West disarmament talks. Kinnock said that the recent breakthrough in U.S.-Soviet arms talks indicates that progress toward a non-nuclear Britain could be achieved in step-by-step arms negotiations. "We want to get rid of Trident. But the fact is now that it does not have to be something for nothing," Kinnock said.
NEWS
September 9, 1988 | United Press International
The first U.S. cruise missiles withdrawn from Europe under the INF treaty headed Thursday for the United States and destruction, in keeping with the arms reduction agreement reached with the Soviets. Two cruise missiles deployed at this U.S. air base about 70 miles north of London were strapped to a truck and taken to another air base for the flight to Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz. About two dozen anti-nuclear demonstrators gathered outside the Molesworth gate.
NEWS
September 14, 1999 | Times Wire Services
Britain revealed Monday that it had suspected for half a century that "traitor granny" Melita Norwood was a Soviet spy, but it had never interviewed her because it didn't want to jeopardize other investigations. Home Secretary Jack Straw, under pressure to reveal the facts about Norwood and a second Soviet spy unmasked by defector Vasili Mitrokhin, said he had first learned of her activities in December 1998.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
The KGB archives revealing that an 87-year-old British woman was a long-serving Soviet spy also say a former Scotland Yard officer served as a KGB messenger in the 1970s, the Sunday Times reported. The revelations come from a book being published this month, the newspaper said.
NEWS
January 31, 1992 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin on Thursday urged second-tier nuclear powers Britain, France and China to join the United States and Russia in announcing plans for new cuts in their nuclear arsenals. Landing in London's fog and cold on the first leg of a trip West that will take him next to the United States and Canada, Yeltsin, appearing healthy, mixed evangelical disarmament messages with pleas for help in achieving the economic reforms he has begun in his country.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After an initial wave of euphoria over President Bush's announcement of unilateral nuclear arms reductions, some European leaders contended Saturday that the President did not go far enough. French President Francois Mitterrand, commander in chief of Western Europe's only independent nuclear force, said France will not reduce its nuclear weapons arsenal until the United States and Soviet Union cut deeper into theirs.
NEWS
November 15, 1990 | From Associated Press
Four protesters delayed but failed to halt the test of a British nuclear weapon Wednesday by infiltrating the remote Nevada Test Site and making their way to ground zero. The device, with an explosive force about 12 times that of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, was detonated at 11:17 a.m., more than two hours behind schedule after the four were removed by security officers, Department of Energy authorities said.
NEWS
November 14, 1990 | From Associated Press
Three London women who are members of Greenpeace have infiltrated the Nevada Test Site in an effort to reach ground zero and stop today's test of a British nuclear weapon, a spokeswoman for the environmental group said Tuesday. "The women are safe and are still moving toward their objective," said Junior Bridge, of Greenpeace in Washington. " . . . They are close enough that their lives would be in danger if the test is set off."
NEWS
October 3, 1989
In a major policy reversal, Britain's opposition Labor Party dropped its once-cherished policy of unilateral nuclear disarmament. At its annual conference, the party voted to adopt a new platform that would commit a Labor government to scrapping Britain's nuclear weapons only in a negotiated arms deal. Ditching the non-nuclear doctrine, a factor in Labor's successive defeats by Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher since the party lost power in 1979, is part of a major policy overhaul.
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