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Nuclear Weapons Japan

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NEWS
April 7, 1987 | From the Washington Post
Japan's Communist Party has reopened the issue of U.S. ships carrying nuclear weapons into Japanese ports, citing a document it says is a 1966 telegram from then-Secretary of State Dean Rusk to the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo. The document appears to confirm that U.S. ships and aircraft routinely brought nuclear weapons into Japan for short transit periods. It also alludes to "confidential arrangements" regarding introduction of nuclear weapons under a 1960 security treaty.
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NEWS
October 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A senior political appointee in Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi's newly launched administration tendered his resignation after creating a furor by saying Japan should consider abandoning its decades-old ban on nuclear weapons, Japanese media said. Analysts said Obuchi, now preparing for an extra session of parliament where he hopes to forge ahead with a key economic stimulus plan, hoped to avoid a major embarrassment by getting parliamentary Vice Defense Minister Shingo Nishimura to resign swiftly.
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NEWS
February 23, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the words of one American official, the need to maintain secrecy is "like preparing for Desert Storm." Sometime this autumn, the Japanese ship Shikishima, armed with 35-millimeter cannon and rapid-fire guns, will set out from the French port of Cherbourg on a seven-week journey so potentially dangerous that several nervous governments will monitor its every nautical mile.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
The man who just stepped down as Japan's defense minister acknowledges that his nation has the ability to produce nuclear weapons, but he says that for political and diplomatic reasons it will never acquire them.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | From a Times Staff Writer
The man who just stepped down as Japan's defense minister acknowledges that his nation has the ability to produce nuclear weapons, but he says that for political and diplomatic reasons it will never acquire them.
NEWS
September 17, 1989
A U.S. Navy ship's visit to Nagasaki, the Japanese city destroyed by an atomic bomb at the close of World War II, turned sour when about 50 chanting protesters refused to allow the captain to approach a large memorial statue in Peace Memorial Park, reportedly because the ship might be carrying nuclear weapons. Capt. Peter Roberts of the frigate Rodney M. Davis instead placed a wreath about 100 feet from the statue. After he left, protesters trampled the wreath.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Michael H. Armacost said Tuesday that a new Socialist Party policy toward the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, which he called the heart of the bilateral relationship, leaves many questions unanswered. Armacost's remark was the first official U.S. reaction to a Sept. 10 announcement by Takako Doi, the Socialist chairwoman, that the party would retain the treaty if it comes to power at the head of a coalition government. "We welcome an adjustment of Socialist thinking on the U.S.
NEWS
October 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A senior political appointee in Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi's newly launched administration tendered his resignation after creating a furor by saying Japan should consider abandoning its decades-old ban on nuclear weapons, Japanese media said. Analysts said Obuchi, now preparing for an extra session of parliament where he hopes to forge ahead with a key economic stimulus plan, hoped to avoid a major embarrassment by getting parliamentary Vice Defense Minister Shingo Nishimura to resign swiftly.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | JIM MANN and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS; Times staff writer Teresa Watanabe, in Seoul, contributed to this report
In a move rich in historical irony, Japan backed away Thursday from its decades-old role as the world's staunchest opponent of nuclear weapons, suggesting that it may reserve the right to develop nuclear capability in the future if a neighbor like North Korea acquires the bomb.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that Germany and Japan are major economic and political powers again, is it only a matter of time before they acquire nuclear weapons? And if they do, some scholars are asking, would it be a bad thing? Both countries strongly disavow any desire to join the club of nuclear powers. But a few American strategic thinkers argue that a nuclear-equipped Germany and Japan could actually do the world some good. "Nuclear weapons have helped keep the peace for 45 years," says John J.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Kabun Muto said Wednesday that Japan must have the will to build nuclear weapons if necessary to defend itself against a North Korean nuclear threat, the Nihon Keizai newspaper reported. Muto made the statement only to Japanese reporters at a news conference in Singapore after assuring the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations that Japan would offer unqualified support for an indefinite extension of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | JIM MANN and LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS; Times staff writer Teresa Watanabe, in Seoul, contributed to this report
In a move rich in historical irony, Japan backed away Thursday from its decades-old role as the world's staunchest opponent of nuclear weapons, suggesting that it may reserve the right to develop nuclear capability in the future if a neighbor like North Korea acquires the bomb.
NEWS
June 9, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that Germany and Japan are major economic and political powers again, is it only a matter of time before they acquire nuclear weapons? And if they do, some scholars are asking, would it be a bad thing? Both countries strongly disavow any desire to join the club of nuclear powers. But a few American strategic thinkers argue that a nuclear-equipped Germany and Japan could actually do the world some good. "Nuclear weapons have helped keep the peace for 45 years," says John J.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the words of one American official, the need to maintain secrecy is "like preparing for Desert Storm." Sometime this autumn, the Japanese ship Shikishima, armed with 35-millimeter cannon and rapid-fire guns, will set out from the French port of Cherbourg on a seven-week journey so potentially dangerous that several nervous governments will monitor its every nautical mile.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Michael H. Armacost said Tuesday that a new Socialist Party policy toward the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, which he called the heart of the bilateral relationship, leaves many questions unanswered. Armacost's remark was the first official U.S. reaction to a Sept. 10 announcement by Takako Doi, the Socialist chairwoman, that the party would retain the treaty if it comes to power at the head of a coalition government. "We welcome an adjustment of Socialist thinking on the U.S.
NEWS
September 17, 1989
A U.S. Navy ship's visit to Nagasaki, the Japanese city destroyed by an atomic bomb at the close of World War II, turned sour when about 50 chanting protesters refused to allow the captain to approach a large memorial statue in Peace Memorial Park, reportedly because the ship might be carrying nuclear weapons. Capt. Peter Roberts of the frigate Rodney M. Davis instead placed a wreath about 100 feet from the statue. After he left, protesters trampled the wreath.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Kabun Muto said Wednesday that Japan must have the will to build nuclear weapons if necessary to defend itself against a North Korean nuclear threat, the Nihon Keizai newspaper reported. Muto made the statement only to Japanese reporters at a news conference in Singapore after assuring the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations that Japan would offer unqualified support for an indefinite extension of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).
NEWS
March 25, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a looming threat to both countries from North Korea's potential development of nuclear weapons, Japan and South Korea on Thursday focused their principal attention on removing mistrust and bitterness from their own relationship. The occasion was a visit by President Kim Young Sam, who arrived for a three-day stay before going on to China.
NEWS
April 7, 1987 | From the Washington Post
Japan's Communist Party has reopened the issue of U.S. ships carrying nuclear weapons into Japanese ports, citing a document it says is a 1966 telegram from then-Secretary of State Dean Rusk to the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo. The document appears to confirm that U.S. ships and aircraft routinely brought nuclear weapons into Japan for short transit periods. It also alludes to "confidential arrangements" regarding introduction of nuclear weapons under a 1960 security treaty.
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