Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNuclear Weapons Russia
IN THE NEWS

Nuclear Weapons Russia

NEWS
January 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Clinton administration is seeking to reassure Russia that a proposal to invest $6.6 billion in a national system to defend against missile attack is not intended to undermine the credibility of Russia's large nuclear force. White House officials said Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen was misunderstood when he mentioned Wednesday the possibility of abandoning the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty that prohibits a national defense against missiles.
Advertisement
NEWS
December 28, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
The military declared 10 newly designed nuclear missiles ready for combat Sunday in its first deployment of the Topol-M, developed to maintain Russia's position as a nuclear power. The single-warhead Topol-M, whose range has been reported to exceed 6,200 miles, will be the new heart of Russia's missile forces, and 40 are expected to be built by the end of 2000, replacing heavier, multiple-warhead missiles.
NEWS
August 1, 1998 | Associated Press
An IBM Corp. subsidiary agreed Friday to pay $8.5 million in federal fines for selling powerful computers ultimately destined for a Russian nuclear weapons laboratory. IBM East Europe/Asia Ltd., the Russian subsidiary of IBM, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Washington to 17 criminal charges. Judge Norma Holloway Johnson imposed the maximum fine allowed under the law, which is designed to prevent the spread of nuclear weapon technology. Prosecutors said the IBM subsidiary sold $1.
NEWS
July 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bonded by the shared interests of their families and a desire to save the world from nuclear peril, Vice President Al Gore and Russian Prime Minister Sergei V. Kiriyenko deemed their first session of the U.S.-Russian Joint Commission on Friday fruitful and grounds for real friendship.
BUSINESS
May 4, 1998 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is director of the 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin. His e-mail address is gary.chapman@mail.utexas.edu
Some social impacts of modern technology--such as threats to personal privacy--can be scary. Others are terrifying. Take the ongoing, vexing interplay between computer security and nuclear weapons. Over the last three weeks, a new group of computer hackers that calls itself Masters of Downloading has released information to back up its claim to have penetrated sensitive Pentagon computer systems.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Signaling that he is not caving in to the West, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin named an experienced nuclear scientist Wednesday to head the nation's huge atomic program and urged him to maintain "parity" with the United States.
NEWS
February 19, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Moscow will shut down three of eight plants involved in nuclear weapons production amid severe fund shortages, a top government official said. Atomic Energy Minister Viktor N. Mikhailov said Russia's military nuclear program has been cut by half over the past six years and now accounts for 10% of the nuclear industry's output. However, Mikhailov said Russia will complete construction of the Bushehr nuclear power plant that it is building in Iran, and he denied U.S.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | From Associated Press
A clearly tired Boris N. Yeltsin gave often-surprising answers at a news conference Tuesday, forcing his spokesman to tone down a declaration he made about cutting nuclear warheads. He also misidentified Germany and Japan as having nuclear weapons and confused listeners with references to Sweden and Finland. The Russian president, who is 66, underwent open-heart surgery in November of last year but has appeared generally strong since.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia will halt all production of weapons-grade plutonium by 2000 and has assured Vice President Al Gore that it has strict control over its existing nuclear weapons, officials announced Tuesday after high-level negotiations between the former Cold War adversaries. The subject of nuclear security dominated talks between Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor S.
NEWS
September 9, 1997 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alexander I. Lebed, the former Russian general and presidential hopeful, has been broadcasting his claim over the past week that Russia has lost track of 100 nuclear bombs the size of suitcases. "A very thorough investigation is necessary," Lebed reiterated to reporters Monday. "The state of nuclear security in Russia poses a danger to the whole world." The general's allegations are roundly denied by Russian officials, who contend that all of Russia's nuclear weapons are safely under control.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|