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Nuclear Weapons Russia

NEWS
January 4, 1993 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three generations of Russians who survived the Cold War paused on this frigid Sunday to recall their fears of instant annihilation and express relief at the biggest arms reduction treaty ever between the world's supreme nuclear powers. "It is great that they have agreed to exterminate those terrible nukes," Helena V. Babundina, an 18-year-old seamstress, exclaimed after Presidents Bush and Boris N. Yeltsin signed the second Strategic Arms Reduction Talks pact in the Kremlin.
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NEWS
January 4, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A jubilant Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and a tired, almost wistful President Bush signed the most sweeping East-West arms reduction accord in history Sunday and voiced optimism about the future of U.S.-Russian ties as Bush prepares to turn over the U.S. helm to President-elect Bill Clinton.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush, intent on leaving the White House in a flourish of statesmanship, came to frigid Moscow on Saturday to sign a nuclear disarmament treaty so unprecedented in scope that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin called it "our joint gift to the peoples of the Earth." "The two powers who once divided the world have now come together to make it a better and a safer place," Bush, who leaves office in 17 days, said after arriving from Somalia, eight hours away and 72 degrees warmer.
NEWS
January 3, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the kind of scene George Bush had seemed to prize above all others in his presidency. The gleaming conference table, the aides scurrying into position, the air electric with portents of history as the two most powerful men in the world sat down together at the summit. The world had all but held its breath to see what the U.S. President and his counterpart from the Kremlin would do.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Lawrence S. Eagleburger, arriving for make-or-break arms control talks, said Sunday that there is "a better than 50-50 chance" that the United States and Russia will sign a treaty cutting nuclear arsenals by more than two-thirds before President Bush leaves office. Eagleburger negotiates today with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei A. Kozyrev and Defense Minister Pavel S.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 48 hours, the two Russians and their Belarussian accomplice holed up in the dreary border town of Brest, waiting for two contacts from Poland to show up. To kill time and the autumn chill, the trio opened a bottle of vodka and began a round-the-clock drinking party. When the Poles arrived in the city of 238,000 in western Belarus, the Russians produced the lead capsule they had stolen from a top-secret installation 1,200 miles to the east. The Poles examined it.
NEWS
November 27, 1992 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty--which would cut nuclear weapons and which once was hailed by President Bush as a major achievement of his Administration's diplomacy--is unlikely to be completed by the time Bush leaves office because of Russian misgivings and American uncertainty, officials said this week. Russia has asked for several changes in the basic framework for a new agreement that Bush and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin announced in June.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flurry of arrests of Eastern European black marketeers trying to sell nuclear material in the West has raised alarm bells of a potential proliferation nightmare. In the wake of the Soviet Union's collapse, Western fears initially focused on Moscow's top atomic scientists and the need to prevent them from selling their skills to dictators, who could then engage in nuclear blackmail. So far, such brain-drain has not occurred, according to those monitoring the Soviet nuclear industry.
NEWS
October 16, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian government has raised at least 22 substantive questions about a proposed treaty to destroy two-thirds of the U.S. and Russian nuclear arsenals, apparently frustrating President Bush's hope of completing the pact before Election Day, a senior Administration official said Thursday. Although the official said he is confident the treaty will be completed, the procedure he outlined could take weeks or months.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nobody told the villagers why the fish in the river turned blind. Or why bulldozers showed up one day to plow under the road. So, they continued to cut hay in the meadows. When these peasants were forced by soldiers to leave their cottages in the Urals, they still didn't get a frank explanation. And even when they began to die, they were not told the truth. The history of the Soviet nuclear program is one of both great scientific prowess and vast human suffering.
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