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Nuclear Weapons Ussr

NEWS
December 12, 1991 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yevgeny I. Ignatenko laughed when asked who is now in charge of the Soviet Atomic Energy Ministry. "If we understood that ourselves, it would be easier to answer that question," the ministry spokesman replied. "I suppose we're all our own bosses. Anarchy is the mother of order, they say." Anarchy, in a slow, creeping form, has plagued the tottering remains of the Soviet central government since the August coup attempt.
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NEWS
December 12, 1991 | DOUGLAS JEHL and DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Officials in the Bush Administration are moving toward a reluctant consensus that Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev will lose the struggle for power in the crumbling Soviet Union and that the United States must now focus its diplomatic attention on Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin. As President Bush met Wednesday with his top national security advisers, his ambassador to Moscow told Congress that Yeltsin will "unquestionably" become the dominant American partner.
NEWS
December 12, 1991 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Decisively defeating Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev in the battle for the hearts and minds of the Soviet armed forces, Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday won top military commanders over to his vision of a post-Soviet commonwealth, sources said. Gorbachev, who made an emotional plea Tuesday to the officers for maintaining some vestiges of the unitary Soviet state, met with a debacle, according to the military sources.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the legislatures of Ukraine and Belarus on Tuesday ratified an agreement to form a Commonwealth of Independent States, a move that further dimmed prospects for the crumbling Soviet Union, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev insisted he will not resign. But a new dispute arose over Gorbachev's role as the military commander in chief, and there were growing questions about who now controls the 3.7-million-member Soviet armed forces.
NEWS
December 11, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CIA Director Robert M. Gates told lawmakers Tuesday that the Soviet Union stands on the brink of the worst civil disorder since the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution and that the chaos could have dangerous repercussions for the entire world. "There is no precedent for an empire as vast as that of Russia or the Soviet Union imploding so suddenly," Gates said in an exceedingly bleak assessment before the House Armed Services Committee.
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | Associated Press
The rapid disintegration of the Soviet central government has raised concern in the Bush Administration about the control and safety of 27,000 nuclear weapons, stored mostly in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus that make up the new Slavic commonwealth and in Kazakhstan. * WHO CONTROLS THEM--A Soviet Defense Ministry spokesman said the nuclear force is still controlled by the military, under the leadership of the State Council.
NEWS
November 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
House and Senate negotiators approved a $500-million aid package to help reduce the Soviet nuclear arsenal and feed the Soviet republics this winter. The package, which trimmed $200 million from a measure passed by the Senate, was included in a supplemental appropriations bill that lawmakers were rushing to complete before Congress adjourns for the year.
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bipartisan group of 15 influential senators sought Thursday to persuade Congress to provide up to $500 million to help the Soviets control and dismantle 15,000 nuclear weapons spread over Russia and three other independence-bound republics.
NEWS
November 20, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as the Soviet Union finally seems ready to talk about permitting more defenses against ballistic missiles, some U.S. government officials are wondering whether it is worthwhile--or even possible--to negotiate with Moscow in these chaotic days about that or any kind of arms control. "Can anybody there deliver on anything they agree to?" a dubious official asked. "Why tie ourselves to agreements with the Russian republic?"
NEWS
November 10, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. officials are expressing increasing concern that the Soviet Union's extensive inventory of defense technology--including nuclear weapons hardware and expertise--may soon go on the world market as a new class of opportunistic capitalists try to turn a fast profit from superpower disintegration. Echoing a theme that has been discussed privately among U.S.
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