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Nuclear Weapons

NEWS
December 18, 1990 | Reuters
Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus said Monday that the Philippines plans to include a clause in a future treaty on U.S. military bases barring nuclear weapons but acknowledged that Manila has no way of enforcing the ban. "At the moment the Americans know that our armed forces do not have the capability of detecting nuclear weapons," he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1998 | CHRIS G. DENINA
The Global Peace and Justice Committee and Campus Ministry group at Cal Lutheran University will co-host a discussion todaythur on nuclear weapons. The discussion, titled "The New Millennium of Nuclear Weapons," will be held at 7 p.m. at the university's Nelson Room, 60 W. Olsen Road. The discussion will be led by Cindy Pile, education director of the Nevada Desert Experience.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | United Press International
Fumes from an incinerator at the Savannah River nuclear weapons factory forced evacuation of 2,000 workers Tuesday, but officials said there was no danger from radioactivity. Four of the employees were treated for breathing problems.
NEWS
October 2, 1988
The next President should increase spending for non-nuclear weapons and meet military budgets by canceling new weapons instead of cutting training, a bipartisan group of legislators recommended. Their report was released by the Congressional Military Reform Caucus, a 7-year-old bipartisan group of senators and House members, chaired by Reps. Charles E. Bennett (D-Fla.) and Tom Ridge (R-Pa.), who have pushed for improvements in U.S. defenses.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Facing a lawsuit by environmentalists, Secretary of Energy James D. Watkins announced his department will conduct major environmental studies of plans to rebuild and clean up 17 nuclear weapons plants in 12 states. Watkins also announced he was sending teams of environmental specialists to five weapons plants or laboratories to study their compliance with federal and state environmental laws as well as health and safety rules.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lev Feoktistov, a leading Soviet nuclear weapons designer who later joined a wave of scientists urging nuclear disarmament, died Thursday--his 74th birthday--in Moscow of an apparent heart attack, Russian news agencies reported. He was a member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and a department chairman at the academy's Lebedev Physics Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1998
Charles S. Godfrey, 79, a physicist who worked on the early development of nuclear weapons. Born in San Francisco, Godfrey was educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and UC Berkeley, where he later worked with the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. He first designed small, tactical nuclear weapons that were tested at Eniwetok Atoll in the Pacific Ocean in the 1950s.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top Ukrainian official denied Thursday that President Leonid Kravchuk had reversed his decision to halt the removal of tactical nuclear weapons from Ukraine to Russia. Kravchuk announced last week that his government would not send any more tactical nuclear weapons to Russia because Russia was not dismantling them. But news reports from Moscow on Wednesday said Kravchuk had backed down after speaking on the telephone with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Firefighters have contained a wind-blown wildfire that grew to more than 10,000 acres early Wednesday, but which burned past a nuclear weapons laboratory and 500 homes without causing major damage, authorities said. The fire began about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday and quickly spread through rolling grasslands in the windy Altamont Pass, said Chopper Snyder, a California Department of Forestry dispatcher. The blaze left the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory untouched after an initial scare, he said.
NEWS
August 31, 1988 | Associated Press
A nuclear weapons test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site Tuesday, 13 days after Soviet scientists monitored a test at the same site in a historic breakthrough for the atomic age. Two Soviet scientists were still on the site during Tuesday's blast but were not involved in monitoring the test. U.S. scientists are currently in the Soviet Union and will monitor a Russian test there Sept. 14.
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