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WORLD
June 11, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency have inspected an underground uranium enrichment plant in Iran and verified that Tehran has frozen sensitive nuclear work there, diplomats said. The team from the Vienna-based agency was briefly barred from one part of the uranium enrichment plant at Natanz, in central Iran, but eventually entered.
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WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Paul Richter
JAKARTA, Indonesia - U.S. diplomats preparing for a new round of nuclear negotiations with Iran this week are pondering an important question: How can they make the Iranians feel like the winners? The U.S. team and diplomats from five other nations sit down with Iran on Tuesday in Vienna to begin bargaining on what could be a historic agreement to prevent the Islamic Republic from gaining a bomb-making capability. An atmosphere of high anticipation surrounds the talks, which are expected to continue for six months to a year, and possibly longer.
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NEWS
September 28, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission will hold hearings in Van Nuys tonight and Friday morning on Rockwell International's request to renew its license to process nuclear fuel and to do related research at the firm's Santa Susana Field Laboratory west of Chatsworth. At tonight's session, scheduled for 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m., NRC administrative judge Peter B. Bloch will take public comments on Rockwell's request for a 10-year license extension. At the Friday hearing, scheduled for 9:30 a.m.
WORLD
November 14, 2013 | By Paul Richter, This article has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON - Iran's new government has slowed expansion of its nuclear program almost to a halt since August, according to the United Nations nuclear watchdog agency, in what experts view as a strong signal of Tehran's desire to resolve a decade-long diplomatic standoff. A report released Thursday by the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency provides the first independent evidence that President Hassan Rouhani, who was elected in June after promising to end the crisis, has essentially stopped new work at Iran's nuclear facilities, including enrichment of uranium and construction of the heavy-water reactor at Arak.
WORLD
July 28, 2005 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
Iranian officials said Wednesday that Iran would soon resume its controversial nuclear work, and that scientists had developed solid-fuel technology to improve the accuracy of missiles already able to reach Israel and nearby U.S. bases. The tough talk comes just days before Iran's new president is to be sworn in.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking a two-month silence on the sensitive issue of future nuclear work at their Santa Susana Field Laboratory, top officials of Rockwell International's Rocketdyne division said next year's planned closure of the "hot lab" at Santa Susana spells the end of the nuclear era at the test site west of Chatsworth.
WORLD
June 27, 2005 | Nahid Siamdoust, Special to The Times
Iranian President-elect Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Sunday that the Islamic Republic would move ahead with what he called its peaceful nuclear program and that the country "didn't necessarily need America" on its path to selfreliance. In his first news conference since his lopsided election victory last week, the hard-line mayor of Tehran brushed off remarks by Defense Secretary Donald H.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 1989
After weeks of dealing with worried residents and alarming reports of contamination, many of the public officials who got a firsthand look at the Rockwell International Santa Susana Field Laboratory on Monday emerged from the scene expressing relief. "No one has any reason to fear from any problems up there," said Mel Blevins, water master for the Upper Los Angeles River Authority of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and one of 70 officials who toured the site. "There's not any ground water or surface water flowing away from the area that has any pollution in it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1989 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of more than 35 homeowner and environmental groups were urged Wednesday to pressure Rockwell International to speed the cleanup of radioactive and chemical pollution at its Santa Susana Field Laboratory west of Chatsworth. Contamination of a portion of the 2,668-acre complex was described in a preliminary report released last month by the U.S. Department of Energy, which has contracted with Rockwell's Rocketdyne division for nuclear work. The report found that while the pollution poses no immediate threat to nearby residents, more environmental tests are necessary to determine the extent of the contamination because of inadequacies in the company's ground-water monitoring system.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2009 | Washington Post
Western and U.N. nuclear officials are evaluating a secret Iranian technical document that appears to show that the country's nuclear scientists are testing a key component used in the detonation of a nuclear warhead, according to intelligence officials and weapons experts familiar with the document. The document, if authenticated, could rank as one of the strongest pieces of evidence pointing to a clandestine Iranian effort to build nuclear weapons, said former intelligence officials and weapons experts.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Paul Richter
UNITED NATIONS - After Secretary of State John F. Kerry sits down Thursday with his Iranian counterpart to start the highest level talks between the two nations in 34 years, negotiators for the two sides are likely to grapple with a highly sensitive issue: Can the mullahs in Tehran be trusted to enrich uranium - potential nuclear bomb fuel - to even low levels on their own soil? President Obama and newly elected Iranian President Hassan Rouhani both implicitly raised the question during their addresses Tuesday to world leaders at the annual United Nations General Assembly gathering.
WORLD
December 7, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The head of the United Nations nuclear watchdog agency acknowledged Thursday that inspectors had made no progress in a yearlong effort to determine whether Iran had conducted research needed to build an atomic bomb. Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency are expected to meet Iranian officials in Tehran next week to seek a resumption of their inquiry on the possible military dimensions of Iran's nuclear program. "We have intensified our dialogue with Iran this year, but no concrete results have been made yet," Yukiya Amano, head of the IAEA, told the nonpartisan Council on Foreign Relations.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2009 | Washington Post
Western and U.N. nuclear officials are evaluating a secret Iranian technical document that appears to show that the country's nuclear scientists are testing a key component used in the detonation of a nuclear warhead, according to intelligence officials and weapons experts familiar with the document. The document, if authenticated, could rank as one of the strongest pieces of evidence pointing to a clandestine Iranian effort to build nuclear weapons, said former intelligence officials and weapons experts.
WORLD
November 15, 2008 | Borzou Daragahi, Daragahi is a Times staff writer.
World powers this week failed to come up with a unified strategy to press Iran on halting controversial elements of its nuclear program, as a report emerged suggesting the country had made progress in advancing a little-examined feature of its atomic infrastructure. Diplomats said Friday that American, European, Russian and Chinese officials meeting the day before in Paris had not reached agreement on further steps to pressure Iran to halt uranium enrichment at its facility in Natanz.
WORLD
February 12, 2007 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Tens of thousands of flag-waving Iranians converged on Azadi Square on Sunday to voice support for Iran's bid for nuclear energy, as President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad vowed to press forward with the nation's uranium enrichment program. "When we suspend our activities, they will never let us resume them," the president told a crowd of cheering, chanting supporters who alternately sang patriotic anthems and burned Uncle Sam-hatted effigies of President Bush.
WORLD
February 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Talks on North Korea's nuclear weapons program resumed here Thursday, with China distributing a draft agreement that U.S. and South Korean envoys described today as offering a good start for discussions. South Korean negotiator Chun Yung-woo and U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Christopher Hill declined to give any details of the draft.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
For the first time since reports were released three weeks ago about chemical and radioactive pollution at Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory, company officials met with a homeowner group in an attempt to quell fears about contamination threatening neighbors. About 100 residents attended the meeting Tuesday sponsored by the Susana Knolls Homeowner Assn., a group of about 400 families who live on the edge of Simi Valley about 1 1/2 miles northeast of the 2,668-acre complex.
WORLD
November 15, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
Iran has slowly but steadily increased its ability to enrich uranium despite international calls to halt its nuclear activities, experts at the International Atomic Energy Agency say in a report released Tuesday. The report, which became public before a meeting next week by the agency's board of governors, emphasizes that Iran's refusal to answer inspectors' questions about its nuclear activities makes it impossible for the IAEA "to confirm the peaceful nature of Iran's program."
WORLD
August 22, 2006 | From Reuters
Iran's supreme religious leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said Monday that his country would pursue its nuclear program despite a U.N. Security Council demand to stop enriching uranium by Aug. 31 or face possible sanctions. Iran is to formally reply today to a trade and technology offer from major powers in return for halting uranium enrichment. The deal aims to allay Western fears that Iran wants to build atomic bombs. Tehran says its program is only for electricity.
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