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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2004 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Sister Mary Augustine decided she wanted to work with the elderly when she was 10 years old. She was in a butcher shop with her mom and saw a shabbily dressed older woman order a quarter-pound of bologna. Even at that early age, she says, it hit her hard: The poor woman seemed to have little to live on all week but bologna. Nearly 50 years later, the nun has ensured that the older people she serves get far more than that.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 3, 2014
Re "A renegade keeps her faith," Column, March 29 What a wonderful way to end Women's History Month. Sandy Banks' column on Sister Judy Vaughan was a tribute to her and to all the nuns who preceded her. In the early days of our country, these valiant women went to the wilderness to establish schools and hospitals. During the Civil War they nursed combatants regardless of side. They went into homes to nurse the ill during the 1918 flu pandemic when others would not or could not. And some of them died prematurely for their efforts.
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OPINION
April 3, 2014
Re "A renegade keeps her faith," Column, March 29 What a wonderful way to end Women's History Month. Sandy Banks' column on Sister Judy Vaughan was a tribute to her and to all the nuns who preceded her. In the early days of our country, these valiant women went to the wilderness to establish schools and hospitals. During the Civil War they nursed combatants regardless of side. They went into homes to nurse the ill during the 1918 flu pandemic when others would not or could not. And some of them died prematurely for their efforts.
WORLD
March 9, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT -- At least a dozen Greek Orthodox nuns kidnapped by Syrian rebels near Damascus in December were released on Sunday, according to Syria's official news agency and Lebanese media reports. The state-run Syrian news outlet reported that the nuns had been freed and were due to arrive at a Syrian border crossing with Lebanon. Various media accounts indicated that the nuns had been released near the rebel-held Syrian city of Yabroud and transported to the Lebanese border town of Arsaal.
OPINION
April 27, 2012
Re "Sisters of mercy and dismay," Column, April 22 Steve Lopez got it right. It's all about the Vatican letting those nuns know who's in charge - and it's not Jesus. I was a member of the Immaculate Heart Community of Los Angeles in the 1960s during the Vatican Council's call for renewal of religious life. We studied the documents and voted on the direction the community should go. All the while, Cardinal James Francis McIntyre, L.A.'s archbishop at the time, used every power he had to crush the community's efforts.
OPINION
June 7, 2012
Re "Nuns reject Vatican criticism," June 2 Perhaps the sisters of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious judged that abortion and gay marriage were already getting a great deal of attention from American Catholic bishops, so they could concentrate on other issues that are also part of the church's social moral teaching, such as human trafficking, domestic abuse, capital punishment and access to healthcare. But they have also been listening to discussions about what the Vatican considers "radical feminist themes," the third rail in the Vatican's agenda.
WORLD
March 9, 2014 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT -- At least a dozen Greek Orthodox nuns kidnapped by Syrian rebels near Damascus in December were released on Sunday, according to Syria's official news agency and Lebanese media reports. The state-run Syrian news outlet reported that the nuns had been freed and were due to arrive at a Syrian border crossing with Lebanon. Various media accounts indicated that the nuns had been released near the rebel-held Syrian city of Yabroud and transported to the Lebanese border town of Arsaal.
NATIONAL
April 19, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The Vatican has ordered an overhaul of the most important group of nuns in the United States after an investigation found what Roman Catholic Church officials called "radical feminist themes" that questioned official positions on homosexuality and the ordination of women. In a bluntly worded report, the Vatican's watchdog of orthodoxy, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, found what it called "serious doctrinal problems" with some of the comments and actions by the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, based in Silver Spring, Md. The Vatican on Wednesday named Archbishop Peter Sartain of Seattle to oversee changes in the group, a process that could take up to five years.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Nabih Bulos, This post has been updated. See below for details.
BEIRUT - Syrian rebels are demanding the release of 1,000 female government detainees in exchange for the freedom of a group of Greek Orthodox nuns being held by opposition forces, according to an account published Friday in a pan-Arab newspaper. The proposed swap indicates that the nuns are now hostages -- contradicting earlier opposition assertions that the sisters were evacuated for their own safety during heavy fighting early this week in Maaloula, a Christian landmark town outside Damascus.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | Associated Press
Rwandan rebels held two Roman Catholic nuns from Spain hostage for a second day Tuesday. Five other nuns, all Rwandans, reportedly were freed. The Rwandan nuns were released Monday, hours after being taken captive by Hutu rebels who attacked a church-run health center in northwestern Rwanda, the private Rwanda News Agency quoted Rwandan military sources as saying. It offered no details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2014 | By Anh Do
An Irvine woman who stole $285,000 from a group of nuns and then spent it all in just 64 days was sentenced Friday to 37 months in federal prison. Linda Rose Gagnon, 59, had promised to help the Roman Catholic sisters buy a retirement home, but instead used the money in a spending spree, paying for pet-sitting services for her dog, gourmet meals and lease payments for an Audi TT sports cars, according to the U.S. attorney's office. The Irvine resident was found guilty in November of three counts of wire fraud for defrauding the U.S. Province of the Religious of Jesus & Mary, an order devoted to educational and charitable work.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
Praise has continued to pour in for an 84-year-old nun and two other Catholic activists who were sentenced to prison this week for embarrassing the U.S. government two years ago by breaking into a nuclear weapons complex in Tennessee. Trying to draw attention to the immorality of nuclear weapons, Megan Rice, 58-year-old Greg Boertje-Obed and 64-year-old Michael Walli cut through several rings of fences at the Y-12 National Security Complex and sprayed blood on a uranium storage facility.
OPINION
January 30, 2014 | By Malcolm Potts
Last week, the Supreme Court ruled that a group of Colorado nuns will not be required to offer contraceptive coverage to employees while pursuing its legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act. The nuns' action highlights the misunderstandings and theological errors behind the Vatican's condemnation of what it terms "artificial contraception. " And it also overlooks an important medical point: The nuns might have something to gain from taking oral contraceptives. But first, some background on the history of contraception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Leave it to the brilliant Malcolm Potts to explain why the Little Sisters of the Poor, the Colorado nuns who recently won an interim U.S. Supreme Court victory , are hurting themselves, not just their female employees, by claiming that they should be exempt from offering contraceptive coverage with their healthcare benefits. Potts, a UC Berkeley public health professor who is an obstetrician and embryologist, is a celebrity in international reproductive health circles. For decades he has pioneered advances in women's reproductive health, particularly in the developing world.
NATIONAL
January 18, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
People recognized St. Jeanne Jugan by the begging basket she carried while walking down the roads of Brittany, in northwest France, in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Going from door to door, Jugan would ask people for money, gifts - whatever they could spare for the elderly poor. Nearly 175 years later, nuns from the religious order Jugan founded, the Little Sisters of the Poor, can still be seen in public, collecting donations to support their work. Unlike some nuns who wear casual clothing these days, the Little Sisters dress in traditional garb, in all white or black habits with gray veils.
OPINION
January 10, 2014
Re "The nuns vs.Obamacare," Editorial, Jan. 7 The case of the nuns seeking an exemption from the Affordable Care Act's contraception coverage mandate speaks to the insanity of linking health insurance to employment. Imagine the outcry if employers were required to offer car insurance but for whatever reason excluded employees from purchasing certain models or types of vehicles. Americans should be able to find insurance outside their employers' options while also having their companies contribute.
NEWS
February 7, 1993 | Associated Press
Two Spanish nuns were freed Friday by Muslims who kidnaped them Jan. 17 while they were picnicking on the southern island of Sulu. Sister Julia Forester, 63, and Sister Fatima Uribarren, 33, were flown to Manila, where they said they will not be returning to Sulu and their work among lepers.
NEWS
May 12, 1985
Why do you sensationalize what 49 women, 40 of whom are ex-nuns, say regarding nuns, thousands of whom go about their wonderful lives of giving service to their fellow human beings, at the same time becoming good, moral people themselves ("Lesbian Nuns Break Their Silence" by Ann Japenga, May 1)? I know nuns. I lived under their jurisdiction in boarding school. I watched the life of my aunt, who was a nun for 50 years. I only wish I could be the saint that she was. The article starts out as if the rule in convents against having "a particular friend" means lesbianism.
OPINION
January 7, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
The Little Sisters of the Poor, an organization of Roman Catholic nuns that runs nursing homes around the country, is testing the contraceptive coverage mandate of the Affordable Care Act. Last week, we're sorry to say, the nuns won a temporary reprieve from Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Under the law, most employers are required to provide their employees with health insurance that covers birth control. But the Obama administration agreed to a compromise for nonprofit religious groups that object to contraception, exempting them from paying for such coverage.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Obama administration lawyers strongly urged Justice Sonia Sotomayor and her fellow Supreme Court members to drop an appeal from the Little Sisters of the Poor and other Catholic groups who object to the so-called contraceptive mandate in the new healthcare law. Nonprofit religious charities already can opt out of the requirement to pay for insurance coverage for contraceptives and therefore have nothing to complain about, U.S. Solicitor...
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