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Nuon Chea

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1999
Re Khmer Rouge leader Khieu Samphan's "apology" for killing more than 1 million Cambodians, Dec. 30: How about if we make him say "I'm sorry, very sorry" exactly 1 million times just so he can have an idea of how large that number is? And maybe have his buddy Nuon Chea by his side to count along with him. WILL RAY Burbank
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WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI -- The death Thursday of one of the last senior leaders of Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime before his trial concluded underscores flaws in the war-crimes tribunal process that threaten to undermine the pursuit of global justice, according to lawyers, human rights activists and victims. Ieng Sary, 87, who died after a battle with heart disease and high blood pressure, was co-founder and foreign minister of the Khmer Rouge. An estimated 1.7 million Cambodians, one quarter of the nation's population at the time, died of disease, starvation, forced labor and execution during its 1975-79 reign.
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TRAVEL
May 16, 2011 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
1925: Saloth Sar, alias Pol Pot, born in central Cambodia. 1949: Pol Pot goes to Paris where he joins a group of young Cambodian revolutionaries, most of them Marxists. 1953: France grants independence to Cambodia under King Norodom Sihanouk; Pol Pot returns to Phnom Penh, trains with Vietnamese communist guerrillas, then works for his cause in the countryside. 1969: Secret U.S. bombing raids begin against Vietnamese communist guerrillas hiding in Cambodia. 1970: Sihanouk deposed by U.S.-backed strongman Lon Nol; the Khmer Rouge and Sihanouk join forces against the nationalists.
WORLD
June 27, 2011 | By Brendan Brady, Los Angeles Times
As a U.N.-backed Cambodian tribunal opens Monday to try former Khmer Rouge leaders charged with genocide, critics accuse the Cambodian government of meddling and the United Nations of failing to uphold the court's independence. Standing trial are the four highest-ranking surviving former Khmer Rouge leaders: head of state Khieu Samphan, 79; Foreign Minister Ieng Sary, 85; his wife, Social Affairs Minister Ieng Thirith, 79; and the revolution's chief ideologue, Nuon Chea, 84. They face multiple charges that include war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein
The fascinating documentary "Enemies of the People" explores the under-told story of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge and the mass genocide that occurred between 1975 and 1979 under notorious regime leader Pol Pot. This investigation grippingly unfolds through the eyes of Phnom Penh Post reporter Thet Sambath (who co-produced and co-directed with Rob Lemkin), whose mother, father and brother all perished during the communist dictator's brutal reign. Sambath arranges unprecedented interviews with several of the henchmen responsible for executing so many of their party's so-called traitors or "enemies of the people" as well as countless innocent villagers.
WORLD
April 1, 2009 | Brendan Brady and Keo Kounila
A Khmer Rouge prison chief accused of mass murder accepted responsibility Tuesday for the torture and death of thousands of Cambodians, telling a genocide tribunal he was "full of shame and regret." "I admit that I am responsible for the crimes, torture and execution at S-21," said Kang Kek Ieu, 66, who was converted to evangelical Christianity before his imprisonment.
WORLD
March 14, 2013 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
NEW DELHI -- The death Thursday of one of the last senior leaders of Cambodia's brutal Khmer Rouge regime before his trial concluded underscores flaws in the war-crimes tribunal process that threaten to undermine the pursuit of global justice, according to lawyers, human rights activists and victims. Ieng Sary, 87, who died after a battle with heart disease and high blood pressure, was co-founder and foreign minister of the Khmer Rouge. An estimated 1.7 million Cambodians, one quarter of the nation's population at the time, died of disease, starvation, forced labor and execution during its 1975-79 reign.
WORLD
June 27, 2011 | By Brendan Brady, Los Angeles Times
As a U.N.-backed Cambodian tribunal opens Monday to try former Khmer Rouge leaders charged with genocide, critics accuse the Cambodian government of meddling and the United Nations of failing to uphold the court's independence. Standing trial are the four highest-ranking surviving former Khmer Rouge leaders: head of state Khieu Samphan, 79; Foreign Minister Ieng Sary, 85; his wife, Social Affairs Minister Ieng Thirith, 79; and the revolution's chief ideologue, Nuon Chea, 84. They face multiple charges that include war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.
WORLD
September 19, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Police arrested the top surviving leader of the Khmer Rouge, Nuon Chea, today because of his role in the notorious Cambodian regime that caused the deaths of 1.7 million people in the 1970s. Officers served Nuon Chea with a warrant for his arrest on charges of crimes against humanity at his home in Pailin, in northwestern Cambodia near the Thai border, police Capt. Sem Sophal said.
WORLD
January 18, 2004 | From Associated Press
The former second-in-command of the Khmer Rouge, admitting he made "mistakes," said Saturday he is willing to face an international genocide tribunal but denied that millions died during the group's reign of terror in Cambodia from 1975 to 1979. "I admit that there was a mistake. But I had my ideology. I wanted to free my country. I wanted people to have well-being," Nuon Chea, the top surviving Khmer Rouge leader, said in an interview in Pailin, the movement's former stronghold.
TRAVEL
May 16, 2011 | By Susan Spano, Special to the Los Angeles Times
1925: Saloth Sar, alias Pol Pot, born in central Cambodia. 1949: Pol Pot goes to Paris where he joins a group of young Cambodian revolutionaries, most of them Marxists. 1953: France grants independence to Cambodia under King Norodom Sihanouk; Pol Pot returns to Phnom Penh, trains with Vietnamese communist guerrillas, then works for his cause in the countryside. 1969: Secret U.S. bombing raids begin against Vietnamese communist guerrillas hiding in Cambodia. 1970: Sihanouk deposed by U.S.-backed strongman Lon Nol; the Khmer Rouge and Sihanouk join forces against the nationalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein
The fascinating documentary "Enemies of the People" explores the under-told story of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge and the mass genocide that occurred between 1975 and 1979 under notorious regime leader Pol Pot. This investigation grippingly unfolds through the eyes of Phnom Penh Post reporter Thet Sambath (who co-produced and co-directed with Rob Lemkin), whose mother, father and brother all perished during the communist dictator's brutal reign. Sambath arranges unprecedented interviews with several of the henchmen responsible for executing so many of their party's so-called traitors or "enemies of the people" as well as countless innocent villagers.
WORLD
April 1, 2009 | Brendan Brady and Keo Kounila
A Khmer Rouge prison chief accused of mass murder accepted responsibility Tuesday for the torture and death of thousands of Cambodians, telling a genocide tribunal he was "full of shame and regret." "I admit that I am responsible for the crimes, torture and execution at S-21," said Kang Kek Ieu, 66, who was converted to evangelical Christianity before his imprisonment.
WORLD
September 19, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Police arrested the top surviving leader of the Khmer Rouge, Nuon Chea, today because of his role in the notorious Cambodian regime that caused the deaths of 1.7 million people in the 1970s. Officers served Nuon Chea with a warrant for his arrest on charges of crimes against humanity at his home in Pailin, in northwestern Cambodia near the Thai border, police Capt. Sem Sophal said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1999
Re Khmer Rouge leader Khieu Samphan's "apology" for killing more than 1 million Cambodians, Dec. 30: How about if we make him say "I'm sorry, very sorry" exactly 1 million times just so he can have an idea of how large that number is? And maybe have his buddy Nuon Chea by his side to count along with him. WILL RAY Burbank
NEWS
December 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Hun Sen said Monday that two leaders of the murderous Khmer Rouge will be welcomed with "flowers . . . not a bullet," defying calls that they be brought to justice. Khieu Samphan, official leader of the revolutionary group, and political chief Nuon Chea will visit Phnom Penh with families today, Hun Sen said. Military officials promised tight security. They will not be forced to appear either in an international tribunal or a Cambodian court, he said.
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