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HOME & GARDEN
January 30, 2010
For a phone guide that deals specifically with the West, I went to a new series of applications by California native plant enthusiast Steve Hartman. Hartman, a board member at the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants in Sun Valley, has two iPhone apps out through a company called Earthrover Software. One is for wildflowers of the Sierra Nevada ranges, another is for California native wildflowers. Each is $9.99. In both cases, Earthrover helps you "key" wildflowers with a series of useful prompts: What time of year is it?
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BUSINESS
December 11, 1996 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In gardens across Southern California, a prickly ground cover, filled with Energizer Bunny-pink blooms, is suddenly everywhere. Thanks to a marketing blitzkrieg rarely seen in the gentle gardening industry, it's proliferating in patio pots, dangling from baskets, advancing over stretches along the freeways, charging up hillsides. The plant--a rosebush of utilitarian purpose and modest looks--goes by a trade name more befitting an indoor-outdoor rug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1988 | BILL BOYARSKY, Times City-County Bureau Chief
The Metropolitan Water District took the first step Monday toward reducing water for San Diego avocados, Orange County nurseries, Riverside-area orange groves and other crops if water shortages continue into next year. An important Metropolitan Water District of Southern California committee voted unanimously for a proposal giving the powerful water agency the authority to cut agricultural water in favor of maintaining supplies for residential and other urban customers.
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | ELIZABETH CHRISTIAN, Times Staff Writer
The shoppers trek to Leucadia from all over Southern California. As often as not, they bring grandmas, children, picnics and--of course--spades and a spare pot or three. Weidners' Begonia Gardens is not your typical neighborhood nursery. This weekend, Weidners' hosts its annual begonia festival, during which you can attend free lectures on everything from putting color in your garden to propagation tips. You also can dig up tuberous begonias for as little as $4.95 a plant.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | NANCY JO HILL
Bonsai is not a hobby for everyone. The art of dwarfing and shaping trees in shallow pots requires a certain feel for each tree's possibilities, as well as an artistic appreciation of form and, most of all, patience. Practitioners of bonsai must water and tend to their plants daily, and it may take years for a plant to attain its optimum form and beauty. Bonsai trees cultivated by masters of the art will be on display from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at Bowers Museum, 2002 N. Main St.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | NANCY JO HILL, Nancy Jo Hill is a regular contributor to Orange County Life.
For hundreds of years, a gnarled California juniper struggled to survive on a wind-swept mountainside near Tehachapi. Snow and rain battered it during the winters, and parched, arid summers stunted its growth. Much of its twisted trunk had died, but a portion of the tree was still alive when Harry Hirao came along in 1974.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California's Rose Bowl may be known the world over, but its once proud rose-growing industry is fading from the landscape, pushed to the brink of extinction by soaring costs and intense competition from Ecuadorean and Colombian blooms. Even California supermarkets such as Ralphs, which once stocked local roses, are now touting the larger blooms and more unusual colors of South American imports. Signs at Ralphs urge customers to "Say It With Ecuadorean Flowers!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1989 | ERIC MALNIC, Times Staff Writer
Aldo Claudio got the call about 10 p.m. "It's down to 30," Ignacio Oceguera said. That meant it was already well below freezing at the 500-acre Monrovia Nursery in Azusa, probably the largest agricultural operation--in terms of sales and employees--in Los Angeles County. And that meant, for about the 10th time this winter, that it would be up to Claudio, a nursery foreman, and two employees, Cesar Reynoso and Leopoldo Carrasco, to save a large portion of the nursery's sensitive crops from frost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the plummeting rate of water conservation, the Santa Clarita City Council delayed action Tuesday on a proposal to ban planting of new lawns during the summer. Citing concerns that the ban would unfairly penalize the nursery and landscaping industry without attacking water waste, the council voted unanimously to send the proposal back to its newly formed drought committee, which had recommended a moratorium on new lawns from June through September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1989 | LESLIE HERZOG
Speeding down the main drag of Corona del Mar on a fast-paced and bland kind of Orange County day, many people don't notice the small wooden, gold-lettered Sherman Library and Gardens sign on the side of the road. But it's here, behind a gated, vine-covered wall, that those weary of concrete can find a riot of color for the senses. They will also find roots to an Orange County past as colorful as any town they may have left behind.
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