Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNurseries
IN THE NEWS

Nurseries

NEWS
October 8, 1987 | United Press International
On many a flowered stretch of Florida highway median blooms the work of convicted killers, armed robbers and habitual thieves. The blossoms are the progeny of Union Correctional Institute, which boasts that its horticulture therapy program is the oldest, biggest and best behind bars. Inside the high steel fences and coils of barbed wire, beefy killers with ferocious tattoos tend the pale lavender orchids. Robbers and check forgers prune the rosebushes and inspect the hibiscus buds.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
From his nursery, Don Newcomer sells succulents to the stars. He can tell you about the Hollywood ingenue who bought some unusual beavertail cactus--with wicked 6-inch-long thorns--and planted them on her hillside to deter the paparazzi. Or about the wealthy producer who wanted a handsome and unusual agave that was growing in the middle of his rose garden. Newcomer didn't want to sell it, since digging up the agave would wreck the garden, so he quoted a really high price.
HOME & GARDEN
March 30, 2006 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
FOR most of the 46 years that the Theodore Payne Foundation has worked to educate Angelenos about the splendor of native flora, the group has been largely dismissed as weed huggers. Payne was an obscure English seedsman who championed wildflowers. The California dream was supposed to be about roses in January, not sagebrush. Yet three years ago, the foundation finally discovered its secret weapon: beauty. It would let the plants do the talking. It would stage a garden tour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2000 | CONSTANCE SOMMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nothing's too good for our gardens these days. We whip out credit cards for fancy pots, exotic flowering plants, eye-catching statues, fruit trees already heavy with bounty. We're investing in upper-crust patio furniture, planting herb gardens that rival Thomas Jefferson's, and re-landscaping our postage-stamp lots with a vengeance born of hours spent watching Home & Garden Television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
He had been called the Indiana Jones of horticulture, breaking his leg while hanging from a cliff in Mexico to collect bromeliads and facing down the rifles of Ecuadorean soldiers who mistook him for a spy. Nurseryman Gary Hammer "risked life and limb, literally, to find new plants and bring them back" to Southern California, said Lili Singer, a horticulturist with the Theodore Payne Foundation in Sun Valley. Over more than 35 years, the plant hunter introduced scores of rare and unusual plants to the local landscape from countries around the world.
MAGAZINE
August 16, 1987 | ROBERT SMAUS
Q: I am interested in planting brooms, particularly the larger varieties such as Genista aethensis , G. hispanica and Cytisus praecox . I have heard that those three grow in Southern California , but I've been unable to find them at any of the nurseries. Can you give me a source? -- D.M., Pasadena A: Brooms should do well in Southern California because many are native to the Mediterranean, which has a climate similiar to ours.
HOME & GARDEN
January 30, 2010
For a phone guide that deals specifically with the West, I went to a new series of applications by California native plant enthusiast Steve Hartman. Hartman, a board member at the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants in Sun Valley, has two iPhone apps out through a company called Earthrover Software. One is for wildflowers of the Sierra Nevada ranges, another is for California native wildflowers. Each is $9.99. In both cases, Earthrover helps you "key" wildflowers with a series of useful prompts: What time of year is it?
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | Associated Press
Last winter's bitter cold spell cost Florida's commercial foliage industry about $175 million, industry officials say. Dade County alone suffered damages of about $100 million to tender tropical plants, trees and shrubs, said the Florida Nurserymen and Growers Assn., based in Orlando. "The numbers aren't quite as large as we had anticipated right after the freeze, but they still have to be considered conservative," said Earl Wells, executive vice president of the association.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2004 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Department of Agriculture regulators were negotiating Tuesday with Florida officials to find ways to ease the state's ban on all California-grown nursery plants, which may violate federal rules. California's $2.
NEWS
July 1, 1999 | ROBERT SMAUS, TIMES GARDEN EDITOR
Most avid gardeners--the kind who will walk a mile for a Michelia champaca--have some "secret source" where they find exciting and unusual plants that they hope no one else has. One such source is Robert Abe's Chia Nursery in Carpinteria. Several really good gardeners have told me that Chia is where they found some exotic plant I was admiring in their gardens. Chia is a cutting-edge grower, specializing in unusual, Mediterranean-climate plants.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|