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Nurses Layoffs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles school district calls these employees "non-essential." But for many of the district's 625,000 students, the more than 600 district health professionals who received layoff notices in March are the only source of medical care because their families cannot afford insurance. At a school-run clinic on the San Fernando High School campus, for example, 70% of the students who seek help have no health insurance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1999 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the loss of two top administrators and concerns that patient care could suffer, executives reassured doctors at St. John's Regional Medical Center on Monday that no layoffs are planned in a push to meet corporate profit goals. Daniel Herlinger, regional president for Catholic Health Care West, met with about three dozen physicians Monday evening to deny rumors that nursing cuts are planned to push the county's largest hospital into the black.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER
The morning recess had just ended at Pacoima Junior High School and for school nurse Tom Hecht, the headaches were just beginning. In a Spartan waiting room outside Hecht's small office, a boy signed his name to a list on a clipboard, then shyly walked into the office. "When I was playing outside, I felt a real bad headache," the boy said. "When did it begin?" "It started about 6 this morning," the boy replied. "Did you tell your mother?" "No. She had to be at work at 6:30."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
At a recent conference on AIDS and teen-agers, a group of local high school nurses learned that certain vaginal disorders in teen-age girls may be early warning signs of an HIV infection. Diane Mastright, Marina High School's nurse for six years, who attended the conference, said she has seen such vaginal infections described in girls ages 14 and 15. "We could be on the verge of a major epidemic if no one is there to (serve) these kids," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
At a recent conference on AIDS and teen-agers, a group of local high school nurses learned that certain vaginal disorders in teen-age girls may be early warning signs of an HIV infection. Diane Mastright, Marina High School's nurse for six years, who attended the conference, said she has seen such vaginal infections described in girls ages 14 and 15. "We could be on the verge of a major epidemic if no one is there to (serve) these kids," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
The superintendent of the Huntington Beach Union High School District on Tuesday recommended that 15 teachers and most school nurses, psychologists and librarians be laid off or reassigned next year to help offset a $3.1-million deficit. Supt. David Hagen presented his spending proposals to the Board of Trustees, touching off a furor among educators and parents in what is becoming an annual controversy for the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1999 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the loss of two top administrators and concerns that patient care could suffer, executives reassured doctors at St. John's Regional Medical Center on Monday that no layoffs are planned in a push to meet corporate profit goals. Daniel Herlinger, regional president for Catholic Health Care West, met with about three dozen physicians Monday evening to deny rumors that nursing cuts are planned to push the county's largest hospital into the black.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1992 | PEGGY Y. LEE
Camarillo State Hospital, moving to partially offset an anticipated $2-million budget shortfall, is planning to cut $200,000 in operating costs and save another $300,000 by not hiring 30 new psychiatric technicians, officials said. The hospital's $86-million budget is primarily funded by the state Department of Developmental Services and the counties that contract with the hospital, said Myron Dimmett, standards compliance coordinator.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Simi Valley Board of Education, which recently voted to lay off 32 temporary teachers in light of a projected $8-million budget deficit next year, has decided to make additional personnel cuts. The board voted late Tuesday night to lay off 28 clerical and service employees, which includes some junior high librarians and elementary school nurses. The layoffs will become effective July 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1994 | PHYLLIS W. JORDAN
After 18 months of deadlock and the threat of a strike, nurses at Ventura County Medical Center have agreed to sign a contract that they believe will protect their rights in case of layoffs. With negotiations at an impasse last April, the County Board of Supervisors unilaterally imposed a new pay and benefits package on the nurses. The California Nurses Assn., which already had threatened to strike, took the case to court and asked a judge to overturn the county's action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | JOHN PENNER
The superintendent of the Huntington Beach Union High School District on Tuesday recommended that 15 teachers and most school nurses, psychologists and librarians be laid off or reassigned next year to help offset a $3.1-million deficit. Supt. David Hagen presented his spending proposals to the Board of Trustees, touching off a furor among educators and parents in what is becoming an annual controversy for the district.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER
The morning recess had just ended at Pacoima Junior High School and for school nurse Tom Hecht, the headaches were just beginning. In a Spartan waiting room outside Hecht's small office, a boy signed his name to a list on a clipboard, then shyly walked into the office. "When I was playing outside, I felt a real bad headache," the boy said. "When did it begin?" "It started about 6 this morning," the boy replied. "Did you tell your mother?" "No. She had to be at work at 6:30."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles school district calls these employees "non-essential." But for many of the district's 625,000 students, the more than 600 district health professionals who received layoff notices in March are the only source of medical care because their families cannot afford insurance. At a school-run clinic on the San Fernando High School campus, for example, 70% of the students who seek help have no health insurance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1994 | PHYLLIS W. JORDAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With negotiations deadlocked and nurses threatening to strike, Ventura County health officials will ask the Board of Supervisors today to force nurses at the county hospital to accept an overall cut in pay and benefits. But the nurses want the board to delay action until they can return to the negotiating table and modify the contract, particularly its provisions allowing Ventura County Medical Center to lay off even the most senior nurses and send others home when the wards are empty.
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