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Nursing Shortage

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OPINION
July 25, 1999
Re "HMOs Don't Squeeze Only Doctors," Commentary, July 19: Jean Chaisson's commentary supporting mandated nurse-to-patient staffing levels in hospitals, while passionate and heartfelt, leads the reader to the wrong conclusion. The Institute of Medicine (at the request of the U.S. Congress), California Department of Health Services and others have come to the same conclusion: Nurse-staffing ratios are inefficient, inflexible and can result in poor care. There is no documented trend showing deterioration of care in California's hospitals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Good news for aging baby boomers: Fears of a nursing shortage may be turning around. Between 1979 and 1991, the number of young nurses declined nearly 50%. It continued to drop for another decade, hitting a low of 102,000 in 2002.  Looking at the numbers, analysts worried that as older nurses retired, there wouldn't be anyone to replace them, leading to a shortfall.    But when economists David I. Auerbach of Rand Health, Peter I. Buerhaus of...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2001
Suzanne Gordon correctly identifies problems within the hospital work environment and offers the correct solutions to the nursing shortage ("Nursing Is What Needs the Cure," Commentary, Aug. 13). As a nurse educator, I can attest to the increasing disillusionment of nursing students to the reality of the overwhelming workloads (nurse-patient ratio and 12-hour shifts) present in acute-care hospitals. Many nursing students realize their mistake in choosing nursing as a career even before graduation from the nursing program--when they enter the hospital environment to begin the clinical portion of their training.
HEALTH
April 27, 2009 | Lisa Zamosky
Filling open nursing positions is no easy task for hospital administrators these days, and there's every chance the job will get tougher. This country has a serious nursing shortage: The American Health Care Assn.'s most recent estimates from July 2008 show 116,000 open hospital nursing positions and more than 19,000 vacancies in long-term care settings. The economic downturn has helped some hospitals as many nurses increase their hours and postpone retirement.
NEWS
June 30, 2002
Re "Nurse Shortage Hurts All" Letters, June 8. It is unfortunate that a longtime retired physician is judging the nursing shortage on his past experience. Dr. Michael T. Kennedy referred to a situation that happened more than 10 years ago when Mission Hospital was a for-profit hospital. And in fact, the incident he referred to did not result in a mass departure of nurses. There are many factors that play into the nation's nursing shortage. The average age of nurses is 44 and many are coming upon retirement.
NEWS
March 31, 1988
I must compliment Times staff writer Mary Barber and the newspaper for running an article (March 16) about the nursing shortage in the San Gabriel Valley. Barber used a limited amount of space to explain the reasons for the nursing shortage and approach the issue from several viewpoints: nursing instructor, nursing students, practicing registered nurses, nursing recruiters and administrators. I must say that the nursing instructors interviewed were good choices. Ms. De Queiros and Dr. Williams were two of my teachers when I attended Pasadena City College school of nursing from 1977 to 1979.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1998
A shortage of qualified nurses to fill dozens of openings across Orange County has some hospitals offering $3,000 bonuses and $1,000 in finders' fees as they search for new hires from New Orleans to Toronto. UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange, for instance, has advertised in a Canadian national newspaper and sent a recruiter to Toronto last month to find critical care nurses who are willing to staff the hospital's intensive care units.
NEWS
July 2, 1989 | LAURENT BELSIE, Christian Science Monitor
A nursing shortage that has been causing havoc in hospitals nationwide is providing a glimpse of what lies ahead for the service sector in particular, and the U.S. economy in general, as the labor force shrinks. In California, as elsewhere, the shortage is driving up nurses' pay. That trend suggests that the American family may be poised to break out of 16 years of stagnant income growth. Higher wages, however, could lead to higher inflation rates unless accompanied by improved productivity.
NEWS
June 22, 2002
According to an American Hospital Assn. report, there are 126,000 nursing vacancies nationwide. A recent New England Journal of Medicine article links this nursing shortage with an increase in patient deaths and illnesses. KAREN KARLITZ spoke with a staff member of the largest registered nurses association in California to learn more about this problem and its resolution. * DIANE HIRSCH-GARCIA Labor representative, California Nurses Assn.
OPINION
June 12, 1988 | DANIEL S. GREENBERG, Daniel S. Greenberg is the editor and publisher of Science & Government Report, a Washington newsletter. and
The nationwide nursing shortage continues to be regarded as a peculiar mystery for which solutions are difficult and elusive. But the mystery is actually quite thin and the answer glaringly apparent: Pay nurses what they're worth, rather than the miserly wages that prevail in their vital work. Does that sound too simple? If so, for illumination, compare two very different professions--law and nursing. In reality, there is no shortage of trained nurses.
OPINION
April 22, 2008
Re "Crisis in healthcare foreseen," April 15 The nursing shortage in the U.S. is one reason our healthcare system is unprepared to meet the needs of aging baby boomers. Plenty of enthusiastic and qualified applicants with interest in a geriatric focus are turned away from nursing programs because there simply is not enough faculty to educate them. Our healthcare system lags behind the expanding roles that nurses can play. Devoting resources to their education and training is an excellent way to address the shortage of practitioners with geriatric expertise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Marie J. Cowan, a UCLA dean and noted researcher who revitalized the university's School of Nursing by advocating for an expanded nursing program and encouraging faculty research, died of colon cancer Feb. 22 at UCLA Medical Center. She was 69. "Under her leadership, the School of Nursing returned to top-10 status nationally," Chancellor Gene D. Block wrote last week in a letter to the campus community.
OPINION
June 17, 2007
Re "Nurse deficit afflicts state," June 11 One of the main problems with increasing enrollment or opening a new nursing program is the lack of registered nurses with a master's degree or higher in nursing. The costs for obtaining this additional education may be out of the reach for many potential nurses. A program waiving student loans for registered nurses who complete a master's in nursing program and agree to teach at a nursing program would go far in resolving this issue. Addressing the shortage of nursing faculty will go a long way in improving the availability of nursing programs for potential students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2007 | Teresa Watanabe, Times Staff Writer
Nicole Oswell was a straight-A student passionately interested since first grade in following in her mother's footsteps as a registered nurse. But she had to wait two years to get into Los Angeles Trade Tech's nursing program, she said, her frustration mounting as national nursing shortages worsened. Lizbeth Gutierrez got lucky. Her wait was only six months.
HEALTH
March 6, 2006 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
When human resources manager Kelly Terrell put the word out that the Thousand Oaks Surgical Hospital was hiring nurses, she expected to have a tough time filling positions. California, after all, is in the midst of a serious nursing shortage, lacking anywhere between 7,000 and 21,000 to properly serve the state's population, according to a 2005 analysis by the Center for California Health Workforce Studies and UC San Francisco. Instead, Terrell was flooded with 1,500 resumes.
OPINION
March 24, 2005
Re "Nursing a Grudge," editorial, March 19: Nurses are leaving nursing for the very reason stated -- they are responsible for the care of too many acutely ill patients. After 14 years as a medical-surgical nurse, I have accepted a position as a recovery room nurse, where I am responsible for only two patients, not the 10 acutely ill patients assigned to me on the medical-surgical floor. Nancy Hoover RN Apple Valley I have the solution to the nursing shortage: Reduce funding to all public hospitals so they can no longer afford to buy proper medical equipment.
OPINION
March 19, 2005
It looks like a spoof of a low-budget horror flick. California's action-hero governor is being stalked by, well, nurses. Dressed in hospital scrubs and practical shoes, they've crashed speeches and fundraisers from the West Coast to the East. They staged a mock funeral with coffins and a New Orleans-style jazz band in front of the state Capitol. One even snagged a ticket to a movie screening attended by the governor, only to be whisked away and later questioned by one of his bodyguards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Legislature will conduct hearings "very shortly" into what the Senate's leader said Wednesday was Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's "egregious" refusal to follow lawmakers' intent to put more nurses in California hospitals.
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