Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsNwa
IN THE NEWS

Nwa

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989
Dennis Hunt, in his March 19 Record Rack item, suggests that N.W.A.'s rap songs reveal the grimness of inner-city life without "prissy moralizing" and that N.W.A.'s contempt for the black woman cannot be abhorred because inner-city life has to be judged by a different set of rules. I am disgusted by this patronizing attitude. Maybe Mr. Hunt ought to buy KRS-1's "Self Destruction" and listen to the "prissy moralizing" of young rappers agonizing over the senseless violence afflicting inner-city communities across the nation and then pass this information on to Easy-E and the rest of N.W.A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
January 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Scientists have identified what they believe to be the first meteorite to originate from the Martian crust, a 2.1-billion-year-old specimen that contains about 10 times more water than any other space rock from the Red Planet. Discovered in the Sahara, the rock - called NWA 7034 - is unlike any of the 110-odd Martian meteorites yet found on Earth, according to a report published online Thursday by the journal Science. Experts said it provided an unprecedented close-up view of the Martian surface and may help scientists understand what NASA's Curiosity and Opportunity rovers are seeing as they roam the terrain.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 18, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Takeover target NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest Airlines, said Monday that its board is willing to consider a range of alternatives for the airline's future, including possibly selling the company to Los Angeles billionaire Marvin Davis. NWA had earlier rejected Davis' bid of $2.62 billion as inadequate. But Monday, the firm said it would talk to Davis or any other interested bidder as part of an effort to "enhance shareholder value." Other alternatives include the repurchase of some of the firm's outstanding shares, a special stock dividend, sale of the entire company and a partial or complete liquidation, NWA said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
When shortstop Barry Larkin was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in July, Reds fans looking to defend his entry had mounds of measurable data at their disposal: 12-time All-Star, three-time Gold Glove winner, league MVP, first shortstop to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in a single season. The truth of his talent was in the numbers. How does one gauge the worthiness of Donna Summer's entry into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013, announced Tuesday along with five others?
BUSINESS
May 27, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Bankers Trust said Friday that it might help finance two opposing bidders for NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest Airlines. The New York-based bank, which is already raising funds to support a bid by Los Angeles financier Alfred A. Checchi, said it may also help finance a competing offer for NWA by Pan Am Corp. George Fasel, a spokesman for Bankers Trust, said it is not a conflict for the bank to support two separate bids. He said Checchi and Pan Am are dealing with different divisions of Bankers Trust, the nation's ninth-largest bank.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Despite various takeover threats, the parent of Northwest Airlines is going ahead with its expansion plans, the carrier said Monday. Steven G. Rothmeier, NWA Inc. chairman and chief executive, told shareholders at the firm's annual meeting here that NWA plans to beef up service to Asia this summer, while it considers acquisition bids that will determine its future. NWA, the largest U.S. carrier in the Pacific market, is the target of at least four possible takeover bids. Two Los Angeles investors, Marvin Davis and Alfred A. Checchi, are considering separate bids, as is Pan Am Corp.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
The deadline on bids for NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest Airlines, passed Tuesday with Pan Am Corp. and Los Angeles billionaire Marvin Davis making competing offers for the airline. NWA would make no comment on the bids or on whether any others had been received. The two known bidders would not disclose the size of their offers. However, Pan Am and oilman Davis, the former owner of 20th Century Fox, have each lined up more than $3 billion in financing. NWA's shares closed at $107.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest Airlines, has received takeover offers from Los Angeles financier Alfred A. Checchi and from Northwest's machinists union, bringing the number of known bidders to four. Details about the bids were not disclosed. As previously reported, NWA has also received bids from Pan Am Corp. and Los Angeles billionaire Marvin Davis. NWA, based in Eagan, Minn., is the fourth-largest U.S. airline and has a strong Pacific route system and valuable real estate in Japan.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | From Times wire services
Pan Am Corp. announced today that it is considering making an offer for NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest Airlines, which is the target of several takeover suitors. Pan Am Chairman Thomas Plaskett made the surprise announcement to shareholders at the financially troubled airline's annual meeting in Washington. He said Pan Am's move is in response to NWA's general request for such proposals. NWA already has received a $2.7-billion takeover offer from Los Angeles investor Marvin Davis, and the airline's unions have said they are also interested in possibly buying the carrier.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1991 | JONATHAN GOLD
*** 1/2 N.W.A "Niggaz4life" Ruthless/Priority At the end of '88, when N.W.A's "Gangsta Gangsta" 12-inch single hit the streets, rap aficionados were confused: How did one reconcile the fact that the freshest beats of the year were inextricably tied to cheerful, unrepentant rhymes about inner-city crime sprees? The group, of course, came up with its own solution: They were "street reporters" who just documented what they saw around them. The rap community sighed--permission to dance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
Randy Newman, Public Enemy, N.W.A, Donna Summer and -- to the delight of progressive rock fans around the world -- Rush are among the names on the final nominees list for 2013 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, which for the first time will be announced at a ceremony to be held next year in Los Angeles. Joining them are the Paul Butterfield Blues Band,  Chic, Deep Purple, Heart, Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, Albert King, Kraftwerk, the Marvelettes, the Meters and Procol Harum.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Ernest Hardy and August Brown, Los Angeles Times
In 1985, Los Angeles rapper Toddy Tee released what could be considered West Coast hip-hop's opening salvo against police brutality in black neighborhoods. The electro-grooved "Batterram," named for the battering ram that then-LAPD Chief Daryl F. Gates used to smash into homes of suspected drug dealers, was a hit on local radio station KDAY-AM. The track went on to become a protest anthem in minority neighborhoods around the city where the device was often deployed against homes that were later proved drug-free: "You're mistakin' my pad for a rockhouse / Well, I know to you we all look the same / But I'm not the one slingin' caine / I work nine to five and ain't a damn thing changed …" rapped Toddy Tee. The L.A. riots of 1992 arrived with its soundtrack in place.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2008 | Jeff Weiss, Special to The Times
More than two decades after he helped define Los Angeles' early electro-rap sound, Arabian Prince holds court inside Sawtelle's vinyl-jammed Turntable Lab. He's still filled with the restless creative spirit that drove him when he was an original member of N.W.A and that is captured on the newly released "Innovative Life: The Anthology -- 1984-1989." "The title had to be 'Innovative Life' because that song expressed everything about me. I always try to create and forge new paths," Arabian Prince, 43, says.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
THE JHERI CURL is long gone, and the scowl, well, Ice Cube still has that, but he uses it selectively now. It was 20 years ago this month that the group N.W.A -- with Cube as its most vital lyricist -- released the shocking "Straight Outta Compton." They called their music "reality rap," but everyone else just called it gangsta, and music history was made.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2007 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
The new N.W.A retrospective "The Best of N.W.A: The Strength of Street Knowledge" raises an interesting question about when is the best time to measure an album's greatness. Is it the week the album is released or two decades later when you can see how well it holds up? The remarkable thing about N.W.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2006 | Robert Hilburn, Special to The Times
YOU could say the often ugly, R-rated brand of hip-hop known as gangsta rap was jump-started by a prank. Dr. Dre, the brilliant record producer, and fellow N.W.A member Eazy-E were motoring through Torrance one afternoon in the late 1980s when Eazy started shooting people at bus stop benches with a paint gun. The rappers thought this was hilarious -- especially because the paint balls were red, which caused their victims to freak out.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
A second round of bidding for the parent of Northwest Airlines ended Friday with four groups submitting revised offers. Few details were available about bids for NWA Inc. from Pan Am Corp., oil billionaire Marvin Davis, Northwest's machinists union and Los Angeles financier Alfred A. Checchi. As in the past, NWA refused to comment on the offers. The Eagan, Minn.-based airline, the fourth-largest in the nation, invited bids in April after rejecting an unsolicited $2.7-billion offer from Davis, the former owner of 20th Century Fox. The company has said it is reviewing options to "enhance shareholder value," including a possible special dividend to shareholders, a corporate reorganization or a sale.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1989 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
KLM Royal Dutch Airlines said Thursday that it has joined with Los Angeles financier Alfred A. Checchi in his bid for NWA Inc., the parent of Northwest Airlines. KLM, which has been looking for a U.S. partner, issued a statement saying it had agreed to buy a "minority equity interest in a corporation formed by Alfred Checchi" to bid for NWA. KLM spokeswoman Odette Fodor said a confidentiality agreement between Checchi's group and NWA prohibited disclosures about the size of KLM's investment.
MAGAZINE
May 12, 2002
I have no fondness for rap, but I thought the article on N.W.A might be interesting reading nonetheless ("Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics," by Terry McDermott, April 14). Once I read it, the only thing that came to mind was a lyric from another song that was, as far as I know, very popular among rap fans: "Don't believe the hype." Tom Orr Huntington Beach Why do a cover story on N.W.A without showing how much damage it did? This misguided musical junta did the Ku Klux Klan's work with its genocidal ethos of black men killing black men, blacks abhorring their own women and hating themselves.
MAGAZINE
May 5, 2002
As a parent of two small children, I may wince and shake my head when I hear the thumping of outrageously loud rap music ("Parental Advisory: Explicit Lyrics," by Terry McDermott, April 14). But I cannot deny the monumental influence that rap music had on my peers and me when we were at UCLA in the '80s. We got a glimpse of Run-DMC at a run-down club near downtown L.A. one evening, and our relationship with rap music was cemented forever. We were mesmerized by performers such as SoulSonic Force, Egyptian Lover, Dr. Dre, the World Class Wreckin' Cru and many others who were at the forefront of the hip-hop explosion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|