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Oak Of Peace

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January 22, 2006 | Lynell George, Lynell George is a Times staff writer.
Many of us consider Greater Los Angeles so over-developed and so well traveled that the thrill of discovery seems long gone. The region, however, is long on charms and abundant with one-of-a-kind treasures that reward just a bit of effort. Here's a sampling of some of our favorite off-the-beaten-path places. And remember: They're secret, so keep it on the q.t. * Echo Mountain/Mt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1993 | MYRON LEVIN and JULIE SHEER, Los Angeles Times
Although California is better known for its moody beaches and redwood forests, oak-studded grasslands and hillsides are its most characteristic landscape. But over the last 150 years or so, enormous numbers of oaks, including many truly grand specimens, have been destroyed to make room for agriculture and residential tracts--which favor the same flat bottom lands and rolling hillsides. A 1988 study by the U.S.
NEWS
September 10, 1993 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Susan Vaughn writes regularly about architecture for Valley Life. and
Imagine the San Fernando Valley 200 years ago. It is a wilderness roamed by Mexican soldiers and Gabrieleno Indians. Spanish settlers are erecting pueblos. Franciscan monks are spreading the word of God. Jose Maria Verdugo, a retired Spanish soldier, has been granted 36,403 acres of San Fernando territory by Spanish Governor Pedro Fages. His land becomes the wilds later tamed as towns: Glendale, Burbank, Eagle Rock, Highland Park, Flintridge, Montrose, La Canada and west Pasadena.
REAL ESTATE
February 20, 1994 | LISA HALLETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES, Hallett is a free-lance writer who also lives among trees and squirrels. and
Doris McKently recalls the day in the late 1950s when she was in front of her Verdugo Woodlands home in northeast Glendale and a Buick crept around the corner, its occupants peering out in search of something. "Dad's a relative of the Verdugo family," the driver explained, "and he said there used to be an adobe around here."
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