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BUSINESS
August 26, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newport Beach businessman Robert Dupre has been convicted of fraud in connection with a three-year federal investigation into the 1991 failure of Oak Tree Savings Bank, Louisiana's largest thrift. Dupre and Houston lawyer W. Harold Sellers were found guilty on 14 counts of conspiracy, bank fraud and money laundering on Aug. 19 in U.S. District Court in New Orleans.
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BUSINESS
March 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Dupre Sentenced to Prison: The former Newport Beach developer was sentenced in federal court in New Orleans to 70 months in prison and fined $500,000 for fraud and conspiracy convictions stemming from a scheme to obtain $85 million in bogus loans from Louisiana's once-largest thrift. U.S. Atty. Eddie J. Jordan said Houston developer W. Harold Sellers was sentenced to more than six years in prison and fined $2 million for his role in the scheme.
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BUSINESS
August 26, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Dupre Convicted of Fraud: The Newport Beach businessman was found guilty of charges resulting from a three-year federal investigation into the 1991 failure of Oak Tree Savings Bank, Louisiana's largest thrift. Dupre and Houston lawyer W. Harold Sellers were convicted on 14 counts of conspiracy, bank fraud and money laundering on Aug. 19 in federal court in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Dupre Sentenced to Prison: The former Newport Beach developer was sentenced in federal court in New Orleans to 70 months in prison and fined $500,000 for fraud and conspiracy convictions stemming from a scheme to obtain $85 million in bogus loans from Louisiana's once-largest thrift. U.S. Atty. Eddie J. Jordan said Houston developer W. Harold Sellers was sentenced to more than six years in prison and fined $2 million for his role in the scheme.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Robert Dupre Convicted of Fraud: The Newport Beach businessman was found guilty of charges resulting from a three-year federal investigation into the 1991 failure of Oak Tree Savings Bank, Louisiana's largest thrift. Dupre and Houston lawyer W. Harold Sellers were convicted on 14 counts of conspiracy, bank fraud and money laundering on Aug. 19 in federal court in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Hills developer Barry G. Hon said Wednesday that he has ended his $275-million bid to buy a Riverside County parcel from Landmark Land Co., whose prize golf courses, resorts and residential acreage he also once coveted. Hon, who only two months ago had agreed to buy most of Landmark's real estate holdings for $967 million, said it would be "too risky" to buy a 6,700-acre parcel called Oak Valley from Landmark's thrift subsidiary, Oak Tree Savings Bank in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three land developers, two of whom are from Orange County, were indicted Friday on charges of defrauding Louisiana's now-failed Oak Tree Savings Bank. U.S. Atty. Robert Boitmann in New Orleans said that Robert Dupre of Newport Beach and Michael Barrack of San Juan Capistrano were charged with conspiracy to commit bank fraud, conspiracy to commit bank bribery and filing false statements to a financial institution. Also indicted on the same charges was W. Harold Sellers of Houston.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1991 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landmark Land Co., which owns some of Southern California's premier golf courses, said Wednesday that it has agreed to sell its prime real estate for as much as $937 million to private interests, including its senior management and investors from Japan. If the sale goes through, it would mark yet another major Japanese investment in prime golf courses in the United States.
BUSINESS
August 26, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Newport Beach businessman Robert Dupre has been convicted of fraud in connection with a three-year federal investigation into the 1991 failure of Oak Tree Savings Bank, Louisiana's largest thrift. Dupre and Houston lawyer W. Harold Sellers were found guilty on 14 counts of conspiracy, bank fraud and money laundering on Aug. 19 in U.S. District Court in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Three land developers, two of whom are from Orange County, were indicted Friday on charges of defrauding Louisiana's now-failed Oak Tree Savings Bank. U.S. Atty. Robert Boitmann in New Orleans said that Robert Dupre of Newport Beach and Michael Barrack of San Juan Capistrano were charged with conspiracy to commit bank fraud, conspiracy to commit bank bribery and filing false statements to a financial institution. Also indicted on the same charges was W. Harold Sellers of Houston.
BUSINESS
January 3, 1991 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Landmark Land Co., which owns some of Southern California's premier golf courses, said Wednesday that it has agreed to sell its prime real estate for as much as $937 million to private interests, including its senior management and investors from Japan. If the sale goes through, it would mark yet another major Japanese investment in prime golf courses in the United States.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Hills developer Barry G. Hon said Wednesday that he has ended his $275-million bid to buy a Riverside County parcel from Landmark Land Co., whose prize golf courses, resorts and residential acreage he also once coveted. Hon, who only two months ago had agreed to buy most of Landmark's real estate holdings for $967 million, said it would be "too risky" to buy a 6,700-acre parcel called Oak Valley from Landmark's thrift subsidiary, Oak Tree Savings Bank in New Orleans.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, developer Barry G. Hon quit as chairman of Tustin-based Eldorado Bank and decided to try to build a bigger pile of gold in real estate. Hon has found riches. He also found fulfillment, frustration and foes as his Hon Development Corp. in Laguna Hills took on increasingly larger and more complex projects from Foothill Ranch in southern Orange County to the controversial plans for a resort hotel and residential community in Rancho Palos Verdes.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1990 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The objection of federal savings and loan regulators Monday to Orange County developer Barry G. Hon's $967-million purchase of Landmark Land Co.'s major resort properties shows their growing clout under the new thrift bailout law. How and when S&L regulators now exercise their new-found muscle have left thrift operators and real estate developers guessing how to comply and cope with strict new industry regulations enacted last August to rescue the S&L deposit insurance system.
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