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Oakland Ca Athletics

NEWS
March 21, 1990 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Oakland City Council narrowly ratified approval of a $660-million deal to bring the Los Angeles Raiders back to town, despite growing community opposition and a petition drive to put the plan to voters. Meeting before several hundred spectators in a downtown theater, the council voted 5 to 3, with one member absent, to proceed with the most lucrative package ever given a sports team to relocate.
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SPORTS
July 12, 1990 | Associated Press
The World Series champion Athletics are considering a plan to leave Oakland if the city succeeds in wooing the Raiders back to the San Francisco Bay area. The A's want the right to leave after the 1995 season if the city gets the Raiders back, according to city officials. The A's also requested a package of rent concessions and loan deferrals that would cost the city and Alameda County about $1.5 million per year if Oakland's latest return-the-Raiders plan works.
SPORTS
June 9, 1995 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hold on Los Angeles, it's not over yet. On a day when rumors were rampant in Oakland that the long-lost Raiders were headed home, club owner Al Davis met for two hours at his El Segundo headquarters with R.D. Hubbard, chief executive officer of Hollywood Park, the proposed site of a $200-million football stadium. While neither would reveal details of the meeting, Hubbard appeared optimistic that a deal can still be struck with Davis to keep the Raiders in Los Angeles.
NEWS
August 14, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
Ironically, the very legal decision loudly applauded in Los Angeles because it enabled the Raiders to move south seven years ago from Oakland has opened the way for the team to seek yet another new home. By limiting the power of National Football League owners to block team moves from city to city, the decision left all teams much freer to relocate.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Olivier doing Hamlet, or Picasso painting Guernica, this has been genius on parade before our eyes. Pavarotti sings. Al Davis leaves. Whoever said, "What goes around, comes around," must have been a Raider fan. Are we surprised? If we are, we must be waking from a coma. Check his track record: Lie down with Al Davis, wake up alone. With Monday's announcement, Davis prepares to return his franchise to Oakland, insisting all the while he didn't want to do it.
SPORTS
June 23, 1995 | Mike Downey
Wednesday began with a report from Oakland that the Raiders were coming home. John Madden, the loud hardware salesman, did a radio interview that got everybody up there all tingly with excitement, and the rumor was off and running faster than Rocket Ismail. By high noon, the Associated Press was quoting somebody with the magnificent name of Ricky Ricardo Jr., who owns a bar just south of Oakland, as saying, "Welcome home, baby. All is forgiven."
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opponents of Oakland's $486-million offer to entice the Raiders back to the Bay Area filed 33,189 petition signatures Wednesday calling for a referendum on the proposed deal. Although the number of raw signatures easily exceeded the 19,716 required, Oakland officials have five weeks to ascertain whether they are valid. Regardless, officials who back the Raider offer have already indicated they are likely to reject the referendum on technicalities.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Davis strongly suggested Monday that Los Angeles politicians were to blame for his deciding to move the Raiders back to Oakland in 1992. "(NFL Commissioner Paul) Tagliabue tried to send a message at the Super Bowl (two months ago) that the Coliseum has been found wanting," Davis, a Raider owner since 1963, said a few minutes after telephoning the Oakland negotiators from his hotel.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Sacramento commits $122 million in public funds to attract the Los Angeles Raiders, and Oakland promises at least $127 million in city and county-guaranteed bonds to lure them back, Los Angeles has yet to offer a single dollar of public money to keep the team.
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