Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOakland Ca Contracts
IN THE NEWS

Oakland Ca Contracts

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
October 24, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The twice-delayed World Series might be headed for more difficulties because Mayor Art Agnos of San Francisco and baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent did not consult Oakland officials when deciding to resume the championships. Games 6 and 7, scheduled for next Tuesday and Wednesday, if needed, could cause a conflict with Rolling Stones concerts Nov. 4-5 at the Oakland Coliseum, according to a report in today's San Francisco Chronicle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oakland has extended by 30 days its deadline for Raider acceptance or rejection of the city's offer to return the football team to the Bay Area, authorities there announced Thursday. The original 45-day period had been scheduled to expire today. The disclosure by both Oakland and Alameda County officials discredits reports that the Raiders might seek an immediate termination of their contract to play in the Los Angeles Coliseum through 1991 so they could return to Oakland this season.
Advertisement
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Olivier doing Hamlet, or Picasso painting Guernica, this has been genius on parade before our eyes. Pavarotti sings. Al Davis leaves. Whoever said, "What goes around, comes around," must have been a Raider fan. Are we surprised? If we are, we must be waking from a coma. Check his track record: Lie down with Al Davis, wake up alone. With Monday's announcement, Davis prepares to return his franchise to Oakland, insisting all the while he didn't want to do it.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dismissing the law as "invalid on its face," a federal judge Friday struck down Oakland's toughest-in-the-nation nuclear-free ordinance in the first federal government challenge of a local nuclear-weapons ban. U.S District Judge John P. Vukasin Jr. concurred with a Justice Department argument that the Oakland law unconstitutionally restricted federal officials' ability to provide for national defense and regulate nuclear energy.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | KENNETH REICH, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles Coliseum Commission gave its private managers the go-ahead Wednesday to negotiate a deal that would keep the Los Angeles Raiders in the Coliseum in exchange for approximately a $125-million reconstruction of the facility and a $30-million cash payment to the team.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Davis strongly suggested Monday that Los Angeles politicians were to blame for his deciding to move the Raiders back to Oakland in 1992. "(NFL Commissioner Paul) Tagliabue tried to send a message at the Super Bowl (two months ago) that the Coliseum has been found wanting," Davis, a Raider owner since 1963, said a few minutes after telephoning the Oakland negotiators from his hotel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oakland has extended by 30 days its deadline for Raider acceptance or rejection of the city's offer to return the football team to the Bay Area, authorities there announced Thursday. The original 45-day period had been scheduled to expire today. The disclosure by both Oakland and Alameda County officials discredits reports that the Raiders might seek an immediate termination of their contract to play in the Los Angeles Coliseum through 1991 so they could return to Oakland this season.
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | KENNETH REICH and JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Oakland officials, buffeted by a storm of public criticism over their $660-million deal to return the Raiders to the city, announced Friday afternoon that team owner Al Davis has agreed to accept $174 million less. The total price of the revised deal would be about $486 million in guaranteed revenue and stadium expansion funds.
SPORTS
March 14, 1990 | MELVIN DURSLAG
The search by Los Angeles for a professional football team to replace the Rams, who fled to Anaheim for big stakes, begins in 1979 with a telephone call from Max Winter, then owner of the Minnesota Vikings, to your beloved correspondent, then a columnist at the Herald Examiner. "I am seriously interested in moving to L.A.," says Winter. "Who is the guy I talk to?" He is directed to labor leader Bill Robertson, at the time a Coliseum commissioner in charge of the football search committee.
SPORTS
March 14, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
From now on, any L.A. Coliseum games played by the Raiders belong on "America's Funniest Home Videos." The inside of the stadium is going to be as empty as the inside of a football. Tickets will be scalped for 50 cents. The Lakers will out-draw the Raiders. The Lazers will out-draw the Raiders. Attendance won't just be announced, it will be identified by name. "The Raiders would like to thank our fans for coming today--both of them."
NEWS
March 31, 1990 | KENNETH REICH and JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Oakland officials, buffeted by a storm of public criticism over their $660-million deal to return the Raiders to the city, announced Friday afternoon that team owner Al Davis has agreed to accept $174 million less. The total price of the revised deal would be about $486 million in guaranteed revenue and stadium expansion funds.
SPORTS
March 14, 1990 | MELVIN DURSLAG
The search by Los Angeles for a professional football team to replace the Rams, who fled to Anaheim for big stakes, begins in 1979 with a telephone call from Max Winter, then owner of the Minnesota Vikings, to your beloved correspondent, then a columnist at the Herald Examiner. "I am seriously interested in moving to L.A.," says Winter. "Who is the guy I talk to?" He is directed to labor leader Bill Robertson, at the time a Coliseum commissioner in charge of the football search committee.
SPORTS
March 14, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
From now on, any L.A. Coliseum games played by the Raiders belong on "America's Funniest Home Videos." The inside of the stadium is going to be as empty as the inside of a football. Tickets will be scalped for 50 cents. The Lakers will out-draw the Raiders. The Lazers will out-draw the Raiders. Attendance won't just be announced, it will be identified by name. "The Raiders would like to thank our fans for coming today--both of them."
SPORTS
March 14, 1990 | JIM COLONNA
Raider season-ticket holders have until May 4 to request in writing a refund on their deposits for the 1990 season, a staff member in the club's ticket office said Tuesday. Those who plan to renew their season tickets must send in a 25% deposit by March 23 and full payment must be received by April 27 to guarantee renewal of seating. According to the season-ticket form, a full refund must be requested, in writing, no later than seven days after the deadline for final payment.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | MARK HEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like Olivier doing Hamlet, or Picasso painting Guernica, this has been genius on parade before our eyes. Pavarotti sings. Al Davis leaves. Whoever said, "What goes around, comes around," must have been a Raider fan. Are we surprised? If we are, we must be waking from a coma. Check his track record: Lie down with Al Davis, wake up alone. With Monday's announcement, Davis prepares to return his franchise to Oakland, insisting all the while he didn't want to do it.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | BOB OATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Davis strongly suggested Monday that Los Angeles politicians were to blame for his deciding to move the Raiders back to Oakland in 1992. "(NFL Commissioner Paul) Tagliabue tried to send a message at the Super Bowl (two months ago) that the Coliseum has been found wanting," Davis, a Raider owner since 1963, said a few minutes after telephoning the Oakland negotiators from his hotel.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raider fans in Oakland cheered the announcement that the team is coming home. "Tell those L.A. fans we're sorry they left, but the Raiders belong here in Oakland," said Stuart Sturges of Los Altos. "We won't have to call them the 'Traitors' anymore." Wearing an Oakland Raider jacket, Mayor Lionel J. Wilson made the announcement in his City Hall office shortly after noon on Monday. As soon as the announcement was made, he was handed a T-shirt bearing the slogan: The Silver and Black are back.
SPORTS
March 14, 1990 | JIM COLONNA
Raider season-ticket holders have until May 4 to request in writing a refund on their deposits for the 1990 season, a staff member in the club's ticket office said Tuesday. Those who plan to renew their season tickets must send in a 25% deposit by March 23 and full payment must be received by April 27 to guarantee renewal of seating. According to the season-ticket form, a full refund must be requested, in writing, no later than seven days after the deadline for final payment.
SPORTS
March 13, 1990 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raider fans in Oakland cheered the announcement that the team is coming home. "Tell those L.A. fans we're sorry they left, but the Raiders belong here in Oakland," said Stuart Sturges of Los Altos. "We won't have to call them the 'Traitors' anymore." Wearing an Oakland Raider jacket, Mayor Lionel J. Wilson made the announcement in his City Hall office shortly after noon on Monday. As soon as the announcement was made, he was handed a T-shirt bearing the slogan: The Silver and Black are back.
SPORTS
October 24, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The twice-delayed World Series might be headed for more difficulties because Mayor Art Agnos of San Francisco and baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent did not consult Oakland officials when deciding to resume the championships. Games 6 and 7, scheduled for next Tuesday and Wednesday, if needed, could cause a conflict with Rolling Stones concerts Nov. 4-5 at the Oakland Coliseum, according to a report in today's San Francisco Chronicle.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|