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NEWS
January 25, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an extraordinarily blunt report, the state auditor general charged Wednesday that the troubled Oakland Unified School District knowingly hired a convicted drug user, paid administrators for days they did not work or degrees they had not earned and granted an inflated contract to an underqualified consultant.
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NEWS
May 6, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Oakland schools task force that six months ago created an international furor by declaring the speech patterns of some African American students a separate "genetically based" language--one deserving of being preserved in classrooms--has issued a new, distinctly less controversial report that does not even use the term "ebonics."
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NEWS
December 21, 1996 | ELAINE WOO and SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Oakland school board President Lucella Harrison, it has brought a merciless barrage of barbs. For radio talk show host Larry Elder, it's been the broadcast equivalent of manna from heaven. Prominent rappers had their opinions, not surprisingly, but so did Arnold Schwarzenegger's former dialect coach--who recalled how the Austrian actor was mocked for his speech.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Oakland school district defended their Ebonics policy before a U.S. Senate panel Thursday, insisting that federal money is not going to be used to instruct students in black English. But the delegation of school officials, accompanied by an Oakland student and the linguist who coined the term Ebonics, were subjected to pointed questions from skeptical senators, who noted that they control $10 billion in federal education funding.
NEWS
May 7, 1995 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District may be viewed by some as a hopelessly fumbling albatross, but to Oakland officials concerned about their city's similarly troubled school system it instead represents hope. Top Oakland leaders visited Los Angeles last week to examine the secrets of the LEARN school reform program and came away with ideas they might be able to use. "Within California, (LEARN) is the broadest, most comprehensive educational initiative going on," said Oakland Mayor Elihu Harris.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | JOHN F. HARRIS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Clinton administration declared Tuesday that "Black English" is a form of slang that does not belong in the classroom, and ruled that school districts that recognize the idiom in their teaching cannot use federal funds targeted for bilingual education. The Oakland school board last week revived a long-brewing linguistic controversy with a unanimous vote declaring that Black English, also known as Ebonics, is not merely a dialect but a language, rooted in a distinct African American culture.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After enduring a month of blistering criticism for its resolution calling Ebonics a language distinct from English, the Oakland Board of Education on Wednesday retracted the two points that most enraged its critics. In a unanimous vote, the seven-member board dropped a reference to African American speech as a "genetically based" language and eliminated a proposal that students be taught in Ebonics, a word coined from "ebony" and "phonics."
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Poverty is on the rise and murders hit an all-time high in 1990. But through it all, Oakland's middle class, black and white, has remained to fight for a city they believe can still attain greatness. If the decay of rusting industrial cities can be reversed anywhere, it is here, they say.
NEWS
January 4, 1997 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest society of linguistic scholars on Friday strongly supported the Oakland School Board's recognition of Ebonics, as an African American speech pattern is becoming known. The Linguistic Society of America commended Oakland's plan, adopted Dec. 18, to use Ebonics to teach some black students standard English, calling the action "linguistically and pedagogically sound."
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
After many telephone conversations with Oakland school officials, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Thursday that he is softening his position on the district's plan to incorporate black English into its curriculum. "Reaching out to find our youth where they are and to building a bridge is the thing to do," Jackson said in a telephone interview from his home in Chicago.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having retracted the most controversial portions of their policy on Ebonics, Oakland school officials said Thursday that they hope to finally shed the distraction of national attention and concentrate on improving the poor test scores of African American students.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After enduring a month of blistering criticism for its resolution calling Ebonics a language distinct from English, the Oakland Board of Education on Wednesday retracted the two points that most enraged its critics. In a unanimous vote, the seven-member board dropped a reference to African American speech as a "genetically based" language and eliminated a proposal that students be taught in Ebonics, a word coined from "ebony" and "phonics."
NEWS
January 4, 1997 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest society of linguistic scholars on Friday strongly supported the Oakland School Board's recognition of Ebonics, as an African American speech pattern is becoming known. The Linguistic Society of America commended Oakland's plan, adopted Dec. 18, to use Ebonics to teach some black students standard English, calling the action "linguistically and pedagogically sound."
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
After many telephone conversations with Oakland school officials, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Thursday that he is softening his position on the district's plan to incorporate black English into its curriculum. "Reaching out to find our youth where they are and to building a bridge is the thing to do," Jackson said in a telephone interview from his home in Chicago.
NEWS
December 25, 1996 | JOHN F. HARRIS, THE WASHINGTON POST
The Clinton administration declared Tuesday that "Black English" is a form of slang that does not belong in the classroom, and ruled that school districts that recognize the idiom in their teaching cannot use federal funds targeted for bilingual education. The Oakland school board last week revived a long-brewing linguistic controversy with a unanimous vote declaring that Black English, also known as Ebonics, is not merely a dialect but a language, rooted in a distinct African American culture.
NEWS
December 21, 1996 | ELAINE WOO and SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Oakland school board President Lucella Harrison, it has brought a merciless barrage of barbs. For radio talk show host Larry Elder, it's been the broadcast equivalent of manna from heaven. Prominent rappers had their opinions, not surprisingly, but so did Arnold Schwarzenegger's former dialect coach--who recalled how the Austrian actor was mocked for his speech.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The Oakland schools task force that six months ago created an international furor by declaring the speech patterns of some African American students a separate "genetically based" language--one deserving of being preserved in classrooms--has issued a new, distinctly less controversial report that does not even use the term "ebonics."
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having retracted the most controversial portions of their policy on Ebonics, Oakland school officials said Thursday that they hope to finally shed the distraction of national attention and concentrate on improving the poor test scores of African American students.
NEWS
December 20, 1996 | ELAINE WOO and MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Saying it has failed to adequately educate African American youngsters, the Oakland Unified School District has declared black English a second language, making it the first district in the nation to give the controversial dialect official status in programs targeting bilingual students.
NEWS
May 7, 1995 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Los Angeles Unified School District may be viewed by some as a hopelessly fumbling albatross, but to Oakland officials concerned about their city's similarly troubled school system it instead represents hope. Top Oakland leaders visited Los Angeles last week to examine the secrets of the LEARN school reform program and came away with ideas they might be able to use. "Within California, (LEARN) is the broadest, most comprehensive educational initiative going on," said Oakland Mayor Elihu Harris.
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