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NEWS
December 1, 1992 | Associated Press
The discovery Monday of a slain kidnap victim pushed to 167 the number of murders in a city that only hours earlier eclipsed the previous single-year homicide record, set last year. Eric Dorrough, 22, was found shot to death near a junior high school, said homicide Lt. Mike Sims. The victim had been taken from his home at gunpoint Sunday night. "We got a call from his wife that the husband was kidnaped but there were no ransom demands," said Sims.
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NEWS
October 23, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were a firefighter shielding a woman from a falling power line; a nurse who supervised reviews of patient care; an architectural writer; a police patrol officer. Several were neighbors or belonged to the same family. The people who died in the devastating fire that ravaged the hills above Oakland and Berkeley apparently fell victim to the brutally, unexpectedly swift speed of the flames.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | DAN MORAIN and JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a weary sigh of relief, authorities declared the most catastrophic brush fire in California history officially out on Wednesday, but the death toll surged to 24 as grim-faced volunteers, assisted by dogs, prowled for missing victims in the torched hills above Oakland. Fire officials also revealed that the blaze--which has caused an estimated $5 billion in damage--has been classified as "suspicious in nature," noting that they have ruled out most natural causes.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once again, fire officials say wood-shingle roofs made a hellish inferno worse, sending it roaring from housetop to housetop through yet another California neighborhood. And once again, the disaster has ignited political fires as well, prompting state and local officials either to recommend banning wood shingles on future construction, or at least making them safer. A somber Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The estranged husband of a San Jose Mercury News photographer was convicted Thursday of second-degree murder. Raymond Houston, 41, of Oakland had been jailed since his arrest nearly two years ago after the body of his wife, Luci Houston, 43, was found in the backseat of her car on Nov. 25, 2001. She had been shot in the head and stomach. Houston faces a maximum of 40 years to life in prison when he's sentenced Dec. 12.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The driver of a van that crashed into a Bay Bridge toll plaza building -- killing himself and a friend -- stabbed his parents to death in 1989, authorities said. Artists Ronald Wade McClave, 39, of Oakland and Mildred Harris, 71, of Emeryville died Saturday in the accident. They were on their way to an art exhibition in San Francisco, where they were to have displayed paintings. McClave was found not guilty by reason of insanity in the stabbing deaths of his parents in San Luis Obispo.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Earth First! activists accused of transporting a bomb that blew up in their car were carrying nails that were identical to those in the explosive, according to the San Francisco Examiner. Police statements filed in Oakland Municipal Court said officers found the sack of nails during a search of the car after the May 24 blast in Oakland, the paper said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A historic boathouse near the Oakland Estuary used for decades by the UC Berkeley men's rowing teams has been given a new lease on life. The boathouse, built in 1924, was slated for destruction to make room for a condominium development, but the developer has responded to a public outcry by agreeing to move the building. The boathouse will be incorporated into a new training facility to be used by men's and women's teams at Berkeley. The women's teams have been training at a separate facility.
NEWS
May 19, 1997 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Twenty years ago, when his promise burned bright and the future seemed boundless, Jerry Brown preached lowered expectations to a captivated California and famously forecast an era of limits. For Brown, at least, that prophesy may have finally come to pass.
MAGAZINE
July 6, 2003 | Scott Duke Harris, Scott Duke Harris last wrote for the magazine about Marin County's hot tub legacy.
Fated to live in the sunset shadows of San Francisco, Oakland has often been called an underdog town, but it's an underdog with a growl. People with money live in its hills, but Oakland, at heart, is a tough waterfront place, an unflinching antihero of a city that has earned its scars and the right to be suspicious. Maybe this put-upon feeling is a black thing. Thirty-five percent of Oakland's residents, a slight plurality, are African American, and the political stew boils.
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