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Oakland Harbor

NEWS
September 17, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate negotiators have agreed to spend more than $180 million next year on construction of key California water projects, including $16.2 million to complete a flood-control project along the San Luis Rey River in Oceanside. The accord on a $22-billion appropriations bill for energy and water projects also calls for spending more than $35 million for work on the federally owned Central Valley Project, much of it for environmental improvements.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1996 | KRISTIN HOHENADEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dressed in all black, 32-year-old Japanese artist Kazue Mizushima moved across a sweeping lawn, between trees connected by taut silk strings that wire the landscape into something resembling a giant outdoor harp. With gloved hands, she plucked an acoustic "Bolero," part of her original composition called "Eve of the Future." The sound plinked into the air, aided, in theory at least, by paper cup amplification, as in the string-and-cup game of telephone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Truck traffic at the normally bustling ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach plummeted Wednesday as thousands of truckers stayed off the job as part of an increasingly tense labor feud. Cargo carriers reported that operations were slowed to 20% of their normal pace in some cases. At Hyundai America Shipping Agency, officials rerouted a 4,400-container vessel, the Hyundai Federal, to deliver inland-bound cargo to Seattle instead of Long Beach, where those containers are usually unloaded.
NEWS
September 17, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House and Senate negotiators have agreed to spend more than $90 million next year to continue work on the massive Santa Ana River flood-control project in Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties. The allocation represents half the $180 million in construction money that the House-Senate conference committee set aside for California water projects in the 1993 fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Hugh Livingston seems an unlikely subterranean. Though at 35 he has lived all over the world -- childhood in Tennessee, a teenage year in Rome, early 20s at CalArts, late 20s in China -- he's adopted the uniform of a generic Middle American: khakis, tucked-in gray T-shirt and broad, open smile.
NEWS
May 8, 1996 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long-festering labor ruckus that has hampered steamship lines and trucking companies around the nation's busiest harbor complex for more than a week is on the verge of reaching a boiling point, with the future of the Southern California shipping industry in doubt and the reputations of the Los Angeles and Long Beach ports on the line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2003 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
In his native Lakota Sioux tongue, Richard Iron Cloud knows the word for the gamble he is about to take -- braving the treacherous currents of the San Francisco Bay off Alcatraz Island for a frigid 1 1/2-mile swim to the mainland. "Zuya," he says -- a phrase that once meant to "go on a war party." But its modern usage, "to look for adventure," better defines the hulking Iron Cloud, a health official at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in the Badlands of South Dakota.
NEWS
February 4, 1985 | United Press International
President Reagan sends to Congress today a $2.3-billion budget for developing the nation's water programs that authorizes $157 million for 75 projects in California, including five new ones. The 1986 Army Corps of Engineers' spending plan includes $3.9 million in non-federal money that local areas must contribute toward construction of seven projects, and $525,000 in matching funds for surveys and design. The budget calls for an increase over the $145.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Burlington Northern train from Chicago rumbles to a stop on Seattle's waterfront and unloads grain headed for Asia. Nearby, Nissans roll onto the dock from a notch in a massive steel box of a ship. A Chinese vessel weighed down by thousands of steel boxes filled with everything from toys to electronics moves toward a row of orange steel cranes perched along the waterfront like birds at a pond.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | DAN MORAIN and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From his home base in San Francisco and his seat of power in the Capitol, Assembly Speaker Willie Brown repeatedly has entangled his public duties with the private interests of his law clients, interviews and public records show. In the decade since he became Speaker, the Democratic leader has moonlighted as a private lawyer collecting more than $1.4 million from clients that include some of the world's richest corporations.
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