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Oakland Symphony Orchestra

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Garcia, an arranger, composer and conductor who was an influential figure in the West Coast music scene during the 1950s and '60s and whose work in Hollywood included writing the score for the 1960 science-fiction classic "The Time Machine," has died. He was 95. Garcia, who walked away from his career in Hollywood in the mid-'60s, died of cancer Sunday at his home in Kerikeri, New Zealand, said his wife, Gina. During his eight-decade career in music, Garcia recorded more than 60 albums under his own name, including the otherworldly sounding "Fantastica: Music From Outer Space" and the avant-garde jazz album "Wigville" in the 1950s.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Russell Garcia, an arranger, composer and conductor who was an influential figure in the West Coast music scene during the 1950s and '60s and whose work in Hollywood included writing the score for the 1960 science-fiction classic "The Time Machine," has died. He was 95. Garcia, who walked away from his career in Hollywood in the mid-'60s, died of cancer Sunday at his home in Kerikeri, New Zealand, said his wife, Gina. During his eight-decade career in music, Garcia recorded more than 60 albums under his own name, including the otherworldly sounding "Fantastica: Music From Outer Space" and the avant-garde jazz album "Wigville" in the 1950s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
When the Oakland Symphony abruptly filed for bankruptcy in September, 1986, Joyce Anderson took it personally. "It should not have happened," she insists. "It's our orchestra. It fills a function that nothing else does. We miss it and we want it back." At the time, orchestral life in Oakland seemed dead beyond hope of resurrection, buried with the stake of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy in its heart and $3.7 million in debts.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
When the Oakland Symphony abruptly filed for bankruptcy in September, 1986, Joyce Anderson took it personally. "It should not have happened," she insists. "It's our orchestra. It fills a function that nothing else does. We miss it and we want it back." At the time, orchestral life in Oakland seemed dead beyond hope of resurrection, buried with the stake of a Chapter 7 bankruptcy in its heart and $3.7 million in debts.
NEWS
March 2, 1987
The bankrupt Oakland Symphony can be resurrected if the city will provide about $100,000 in "seed money," says an 11-member task force appointed by Mayor Lionel Wilson. "We have found out this community wants an orchestra," said task force member Roy Eisenhardt, president of the Oakland A's baseball team. "We have found they want a full orchestra--not half a loaf." The symphony was dissolved in federal bankruptcy court last September.
NEWS
February 3, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eugene Trefethen Jr., who oversaw the building of Hoover Dam and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge for Henry J. Kaiser, and later owned a world-class winery estate, has died. He was 86. The philanthropist, who also helped create the Walter A. Haas School of Business at UC Berkeley, died Wednesday at his home after a brief illness. Trefethen began his career in 1926, working during school vacations as a sand-and-gravel laborer with the Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Charles Brown has been around longer than Charlie Brown. The senior Brown, a smooth piano player, had his first hit, "Driftin' Blues" right after World War II. Now, at 72, Brown has just released a new album, "Just a Lucky So and So," his third since his re-emergence in 1990. He and his tight band will be at SOhO--that place in Santa Barbara still searching for a capital H--on Saturday night. Brown has plenty of stories to tell.
NEWS
April 24, 1995 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 1,000 or so men and women, elegant in their tuxedos and gowns, could tell this was no rubber-chicken political affair when they were ushered to the dining room through a tunnel of palm fronds, as pumped-in mist swirled around their feet. The mist vapor allowed each guest at this black-tie affair to make a grand entrance. On stage, the Oakland Symphony Orchestra, complete down to the harp, provided music. Later, the symphony would play backup for headliner Ray Charles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
The much-bruited recent demise of a few orchestras does not mean the other 1,400 American orchestras are dying, according to speakers at the national conference of the American Symphony Orchestra League here. "It's been blown out of proportion," said Henry Fogel, executive director of the host Chicago Symphony. Catherine French, chief executive officer of the league, agreed. "Basically, orchestras in this country refuse to die."
NEWS
May 2, 1986 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
It is perhaps a sign of these topsy-turvy times that the major speakers at a recent music educators' conference included: --A tennis expert who has still not fully recovered from being kicked out of his third-grade glee club. --A bassist who demonstrated how endearingly he could play "Greensleeves" off key. --A neurologist who's written a book titled "Tone Deaf and All Thumbs? An Invitation to Music-Making for Late Bloomers and Non-Prodigies."
NEWS
March 2, 1987
The bankrupt Oakland Symphony can be resurrected if the city will provide about $100,000 in "seed money," says an 11-member task force appointed by Mayor Lionel Wilson. "We have found out this community wants an orchestra," said task force member Roy Eisenhardt, president of the Oakland A's baseball team. "We have found they want a full orchestra--not half a loaf." The symphony was dissolved in federal bankruptcy court last September.
NEWS
August 11, 1987 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
Christopher Dunworth remembers it as a sublime moment in cultural history. The plush seats of Denver's staid concert hall were afidget with 2,600 football fans lured in by the promise of a Super Bowl pep rally. Naturally, it came as a bit of a shock when the Denver Symphony Orchestra filed out and started playing Dvorak's Slavonic Rhapsody No. 3 in A-flat Major. Even more surprising was what happened after intermission.
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