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Oakland Unified School District

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Oakland schools will regain some local control 2 1/2 years after the state stripped the board of power following near-bankruptcy, state officials said. The Oakland school board will be allowed to manage relationships with reporters and help operate school advisory councils but will have no say in academics, finances or campus operations, state Supt. Jack O'Connell said Tuesday.
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NEWS
January 16, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After enduring a month of blistering criticism for its resolution calling Ebonics a language distinct from English, the Oakland Board of Education on Wednesday retracted the two points that most enraged its critics. In a unanimous vote, the seven-member board dropped a reference to African American speech as a "genetically based" language and eliminated a proposal that students be taught in Ebonics, a word coined from "ebony" and "phonics."
NEWS
January 4, 1997 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest society of linguistic scholars on Friday strongly supported the Oakland School Board's recognition of Ebonics, as an African American speech pattern is becoming known. The Linguistic Society of America commended Oakland's plan, adopted Dec. 18, to use Ebonics to teach some black students standard English, calling the action "linguistically and pedagogically sound."
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
After many telephone conversations with Oakland school officials, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Thursday that he is softening his position on the district's plan to incorporate black English into its curriculum. "Reaching out to find our youth where they are and to building a bridge is the thing to do," Jackson said in a telephone interview from his home in Chicago.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having retracted the most controversial portions of their policy on Ebonics, Oakland school officials said Thursday that they hope to finally shed the distraction of national attention and concentrate on improving the poor test scores of African American students.
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Less than two weeks after their embrace of Ebonics as a distinct black language brought them international derision, Oakland school officials tried Monday to redefine the issue by arguing that they had been misinterpreted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Almost 7,000 school district employees will have to show up at district headquarters this week if they want to get paid. An audit two years ago found a small number of "ghost" employees were receiving paychecks without working in the school system. The district is performing a second audit to ensure that paychecks are going to the 6,943 verified employees and that all workers are being paid the correct amount. Oakland schools have recently spent millions upgrading payroll and personnel systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2009 | Seema Mehta
The Oakland Unified School District and state education officials are in a legal tussle over increased funding for the city's 32 charter schools. The district has been under state control since 2003 because of a fiscal meltdown. State Administrator Vincent Matthews this month ordered the district to give an additional $450,000, or $60 per student, to the charter schools. The move was made at the behest of California Supt. of Public Instruction Jack O'Connell and prompted by a parcel tax approved by voters last year that included additional funding for the district's 107 traditional schools, but not for charters.
NEWS
January 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a protest of impending war with Iraq, the Oakland Board of Education voted 7 to 0 to stop selling names, phone numbers and addresses of high school students to military recruiters. About 30 parents, students and anti-war activists spoke Wednesday night against recruiters' repeated phone calls and letters to high school students. The Oakland Unified School District, the state's sixth largest, had sold lists for $150 to the services in a practice that is common across the state.
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