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Oakland Unified School District

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2003 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
State legislators are expected to put the finishing touches today on a bill to provide an emergency $100-million state loan for the insolvent Oakland Unified School District, a step that would lead to a state takeover of the 48,000-student school system. Backers were hoping to push an amended version of the bill through the state Senate to provide the largest financial bailout of a school district in California history. The Assembly already approved the measure and a spokesman said Gov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2003 | From Associated Press
The largest school bailout in state history was approved by the Assembly Friday, moving an Oakland school district closer to financial solvency and oversight by a state administrator. The Assembly voted 54-9 to approve a $100-million emergency loan to the Oakland Unified School District. Sen. Don Perata (D-Oakland) said the district had run up debts because of an antiquated accounting system, declining enrollment and rising expenses, including higher salaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2003 | Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writer
The California Senate voted reluctantly Thursday to rescue the financially ailing Oakland Unified School District with a record $100-million state loan. The action provided a fresh example of the persistent demands on the state treasury for funds, even as state government itself sinks deeper into the quicksand of its own budget shortage. The Oakland school district appealed to Gov.
NEWS
November 14, 1999 | SAM BRUCHEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In this Bay Area city, where 25% of all middle school students were suspended last year, sending children home for behavioral problems in the classroom has become the rule, not the exception. But the Oakland Unified School District, which forfeits state funding for each student it suspends, is considering a new approach to deal with disciplinary problems in-house and keep troubled children in school.
NEWS
January 24, 1997 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the Oakland school district defended their Ebonics policy before a U.S. Senate panel Thursday, insisting that federal money is not going to be used to instruct students in black English. But the delegation of school officials, accompanied by an Oakland student and the linguist who coined the term Ebonics, were subjected to pointed questions from skeptical senators, who noted that they control $10 billion in federal education funding.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having retracted the most controversial portions of their policy on Ebonics, Oakland school officials said Thursday that they hope to finally shed the distraction of national attention and concentrate on improving the poor test scores of African American students.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After enduring a month of blistering criticism for its resolution calling Ebonics a language distinct from English, the Oakland Board of Education on Wednesday retracted the two points that most enraged its critics. In a unanimous vote, the seven-member board dropped a reference to African American speech as a "genetically based" language and eliminated a proposal that students be taught in Ebonics, a word coined from "ebony" and "phonics."
NEWS
January 4, 1997 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest society of linguistic scholars on Friday strongly supported the Oakland School Board's recognition of Ebonics, as an African American speech pattern is becoming known. The Linguistic Society of America commended Oakland's plan, adopted Dec. 18, to use Ebonics to teach some black students standard English, calling the action "linguistically and pedagogically sound."
NEWS
December 31, 1996 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Less than two weeks after their embrace of Ebonics as a distinct black language brought them international derision, Oakland school officials tried Monday to redefine the issue by arguing that they had been misinterpreted.
NEWS
December 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
After many telephone conversations with Oakland school officials, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Thursday that he is softening his position on the district's plan to incorporate black English into its curriculum. "Reaching out to find our youth where they are and to building a bridge is the thing to do," Jackson said in a telephone interview from his home in Chicago.
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