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Oakwood Beautification Committee

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NEWS
May 22, 1990 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush visited one of Los Angeles' grittiest neighborhoods Monday to praise a 72-year-old semi-retired janitor and the residents he has led in a months-long crusade to clean up the drug and gang plagued Oakwood neighborhood of Venice. The President, who touched down in Los Angeles for less than four hours Monday on a quick trip through the West, bestowed one of his "Point of Light" awards on Foster Webster, founder of the Oakwood Beautification Committee.
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NEWS
March 5, 1992 | SHAWN DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When federal officials recently balked at a proposal to hire the Nation of Islam to rid 14 federally subsidized apartment buildings in Venice's Oakwood section of drug dealers and gangbangers, residents knew why. "They won't let the brothers in because they want to keep us oppressed," said Regina Hyman, a tenant organizer. "They want blacks to keep getting shot up." Some residents of Oakwood have long suspected that developers, real estate speculators and police have allowed crime to fester at the buildings because they want an excuse to tear them down.
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NEWS
March 5, 1992 | SHAWN DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When federal officials recently balked at a proposal to hire the Nation of Islam to rid 14 federally subsidized apartment buildings in Venice's Oakwood section of drug dealers and gangbangers, residents knew why. "They won't let the brothers in because they want to keep us oppressed," said Regina Hyman, a tenant organizer. "They want blacks to keep getting shot up." Some residents of Oakwood have long suspected that developers, real estate speculators and police have allowed crime to fester at the buildings because they want an excuse to tear them down.
NEWS
May 22, 1990 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush visited one of Los Angeles' grittiest neighborhoods Monday to praise a 72-year-old semi-retired janitor and the residents he has led in a months-long crusade to clean up the drug and gang plagued Oakwood neighborhood of Venice. The President, who touched down in Los Angeles for less than four hours Monday on a quick trip through the West, bestowed one of his "Point of Light" awards on Foster Webster, founder of the Oakwood Beautification Committee.
NEWS
April 19, 1990
Residents of the Oakwood section of Venice are planning a candlelight march through their neighborhood Friday night to protest neighborhood crime and violence. Grant Hudson of the Oakwood Beautification Committee said the group is trying to unite residents to arise and reclaim the streets from drug dealers and gang members, though the march will not be confrontational. Hudson said residents were reluctant to parade the streets because of fear they might be subject to violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1990
President Bush on Monday will visit the Venice home of Foster Webster to present the 72-year-old janitor and war veteran with a "Point of Light" award. Webster is being honored for helping organize a grass-roots group to help clean up crime-ridden streets in the Oakwood area of Venice. The Oakwood Beautification Committee was formed about a year ago at the behest of the Los Angeles Police Department as part of an all-out effort to attack crime in the area and improve police community relations.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foster Webster, clad in his trademark coveralls, calmly swept up freshly mowed grass at the curb of his California bungalow in Oakwood, as if this were any other day. The activity swirling around him suggested otherwise, particularly the sight of Secret Service types in shirt sleeves and ties peering over fences and checking out the neighbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA and NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For one brief, shining moment this week, Oakwood shed its battered image. A visit by President Bush to the troubled Venice neighborhood to honor a community activist for his fight against gangs and drugs gave some residents a rare opportunity to cheer. It gave recognition to community leaders who have waged a near-Sisyphean struggle to rid the neighborhood of an intractable foe. And it gave the President a national forum to promote his volunteer program and express his vision of hope.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | SHAWN DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Somebody tossed Robert Pollard a message last week. He came home to find that a military-style smoke grenade had broken his window and rebounded, landing in the yard near his goldfish pond. The attack was just the latest incident in an escalating spate of violence against Pollard and his business partner, Brian Collier, both of whom are known in Venice's Oakwood neighborhood for cooperating with police efforts to stem the neighborhood's intense drug-related violence.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half an hour before Reginald Denny drove his truck into the now-famous intersection of Florence and Normandie avenues, Mark Rosenberg pedaled his bicycle along a residential street in Venice--and into a chillingly similar reign of terror. Much as Denny was pulled from his truck, the 33-year-old Rosenberg was pulled off his bike, then beaten unconscious by a group of young black men.
NEWS
May 5, 1992 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
One of the underreported stories of last week's catastrophic unrest was what took place in the seaside neighborhood of Oakwood, an area of about 9,200 residents in the middle of Venice. Unlike other parts of the city where businesses were the primary targets, in Oakwood, dozens of homes were attacked. One of the worst episodes occurred Wednesday night, when a mob of about 25 people came crashing through the gates of Alan and Caren Smith's rented two-story home on Indiana Avenue.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | SHAWN DOHERTY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A proposal to hire security guards affiliated with the Nation of Islam, the organization headed by the Rev. Louis Farrakhan, to patrol 15 federally subsidized apartment buildings in Venice's Oakwood section has thrown the crime-embattled neighborhood into the middle of controversy.
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