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NEWS
February 13, 1986 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
At least three top associates of exiled Haitian President-for-Life Jean-Claude Duvalier have quietly entered the United States and are living in anonymous splendor in expensive hotels and hideaways, Haitian activists and other experts said Wednesday. The three, including Duvalier's father-in-law and his former interior and foreign ministers, arrived here shortly before the strongman known as "Baby Doc" flew to temporary asylum in France last Friday aboard a U.S. Air Force plane.
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WORLD
March 5, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - President Nicolas Maduro said Wednesday that  he is breaking diplomatic relations with Panama, a decision he announced amid commemorations of the first anniversary of predecessor Hugo Chavez's death and continuing protests against Maduro's administration. Maduro said he was taking action because Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli criticized police actions against Venezuelan protesters and because the Central American leader has urged that the Organization of American States debate Maduro's alleged repression of the demonstrators.
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NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The Organization of American States finishes up its annual meeting in Bolivia on Tuesday. The normally humdrum assembly of 35 nations is turning out to be one of the most controversial gatherings in years, thanks to an effort by a handful of countries to weaken one of the OAS' most important and autonomous bodies: the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Those efforts began early this year when Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, sought to prevent the commission's special rapporteur for freedom of expression from doing her job effectively.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - The Organization of American States said Friday that countries should consider decriminalizing drug use, a shift backed by several Latin American leaders but opposed by the United States. Decriminalization could be one of many “transitional methods” in a public health strategy that could include “drug courts, substantive reduction in sentences and rehabilitation,” according to a report released by the OAS on the possible liberalization of drug polices. The report, presented by OAS Secretary-General Jose Miguel Insulza in Bogota, was commissioned during the April 2012 Summit of the Americas in Cartagena, Colombia, in response to many leaders' complaints that U.S.-driven drug prohibition policies of recent decades had failed to stem the illicit drug business.
WORLD
May 17, 2013 | By Chris Kraul
BOGOTA, Colombia - The Organization of American States said Friday that countries should consider decriminalizing drug use, a shift backed by several Latin American leaders but opposed by the United States. Decriminalization could be one of many “transitional methods” in a public health strategy that could include “drug courts, substantive reduction in sentences and rehabilitation,” according to a report released by the OAS on the possible liberalization of drug polices. The report, presented by OAS Secretary-General Jose Miguel Insulza in Bogota, was commissioned during the April 2012 Summit of the Americas in Cartagena, Colombia, in response to many leaders' complaints that U.S.-driven drug prohibition policies of recent decades had failed to stem the illicit drug business.
NEWS
January 30, 1985 | United Press International
Chile's ambassador to the Organization of American States has resigned, shortly after published reports quoted her as criticizing policies of Gen. Augusto Pinochet's government, officials said Tuesday. Other sources said she was forced to resign.
OPINION
July 29, 2011
For much of the last decade, the United States has been relatively disengaged from Latin America, getting involved mostly to combat drugs or violence. Now, the House Foreign Affairs Committee has approved a measure that would further limit the U.S. role in the region. Under the proposal, which would have to be approved by both the House and the Senate, the U.S. would eliminate its $48.5-million contribution to the Organization of American States, the oldest and largest regional diplomatic group in the Western Hemisphere.
WORLD
August 27, 2009 | Reuters
Colombia filed a formal complaint Wednesday with the Organization of American States against Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, accusing the leftist leader of meddling in its domestic affairs. The OAS complaint came after Chavez attacked Colombia as a "narco-state," ordered investigations of Colombian companies in Venezuela and urged his socialist party supporters to reach out to left-leaning Colombians and politicians. Colombia's ambassador to the OAS, Luis Hoyos, denounced what his government saw as an "interventionist plan" by Chavez, a Cuba ally who promotes socialist revolution as the counterweight to U.S. influence in Latin America.
WORLD
July 2, 2009 | Ken Ellingwood and Alex Renderos
Ramping up pressure on Honduras' interim rulers, the Organization of American States threatened Wednesday to suspend the nation's membership if ousted President Manuel Zelaya was not returned to power within 72 hours. The move prompted Zelaya to announce he would delay plans to return to Honduras until the weekend. Zelaya, deposed by the Honduran army Sunday in a coup that has drawn broad international condemnation, had said earlier he would go back today, accompanied by other regional leaders.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | DON SHANNON and DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writers
The Organization of American States adopted a resolution Wednesday criticizing Panamanian strongman Manuel A. Noriega and calling for steps toward "a transfer of power" in Panama--but the action fell short of what the United States had wanted, an outright demand for Noriega's ouster. Secretary of State James A. Baker III lobbied discreetly for a stronger text, but the Latin traditions of consensus and noninterventionism stood in the way, diplomats at the 32-nation body said. The resolution was approved unanimously, although Panama and Nicaragua earlier opposed it in a 27-2 vote on the draft that emerged from hours of closed-door debate.
OPINION
April 5, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The campaign to succeed the late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez is underway, and as with past campaigns in that country, passions are running high. Vice President Nicolas Maduro and opposition candidate Henrique Capriles exchange near-daily attacks, each accusing the other of everything from plotting murder to planning coups. But unlike in previous elections, the National Election Council has not invited international monitors to observe the April 14 vote. Instead, it has asked a handful of individuals and the Union of South American Nations to "accompany" the process - a far more limited role that does not provide them full and free access to polling places and does not allow them to make public statements questioning or criticizing the process.
OPINION
June 12, 2012
To no one's surprise, Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa is upset with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, a watchdog group that has pushed to protect indigenous leaders, journalists and civil society organizations in the Western Hemisphere from abuses. And the feeling appears to be mutual. The commission has rightly denounced Correa's efforts to curb freedom of expression and jail critics of his administration. It also dared to weigh in on Venezuela's attempt to ban an opposition candidate from running for office against President Hugo Chavez.
NEWS
June 5, 2012 | By Sandra Hernandez
The Organization of American States finishes up its annual meeting in Bolivia on Tuesday. The normally humdrum assembly of 35 nations is turning out to be one of the most controversial gatherings in years, thanks to an effort by a handful of countries to weaken one of the OAS' most important and autonomous bodies: the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. Those efforts began early this year when Ecuador's president, Rafael Correa, sought to prevent the commission's special rapporteur for freedom of expression from doing her job effectively.
OPINION
January 23, 2012
Since taking office in 2007, Ecuador's President Rafael Correa has been in a war of words with the media in his country. He's used archaic libel laws to pursue criminal charges against the owners of El Universo and a columnist at the newspaper. His government has pushed through a law that severely restricts the media's ability to cover political campaigns and elections; indeed, it goes so far as to ban any media reports that can benefit or hurt a candidate. And now he's set his sights on international media observers.
OPINION
July 29, 2011
For much of the last decade, the United States has been relatively disengaged from Latin America, getting involved mostly to combat drugs or violence. Now, the House Foreign Affairs Committee has approved a measure that would further limit the U.S. role in the region. Under the proposal, which would have to be approved by both the House and the Senate, the U.S. would eliminate its $48.5-million contribution to the Organization of American States, the oldest and largest regional diplomatic group in the Western Hemisphere.
OPINION
June 7, 2011 | By Noah Feldman, David Landau and Brian Sheppard
Is Honduras ready for a return to the community of nations? It has been almost two years since the forced removal of then-President Manuel Zelaya at the hands of the Honduran military. On June 1, the Organization of American States said yes, when it lifted the suspension of Honduras from the organization by a vote of 32 countries in favor and one against. Still, the question on everyone's mind remains: Was there a coup d'état in 2009? Perhaps the better question to ask is: How can similar instability be avoided in the future in Honduras and elsewhere in the region?
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III pledged Monday that Western democracies will help Peru solve its severe economic problems if it restores constitutional government but that it faces international isolation and deepening poverty if it does not.
OPINION
June 11, 1989 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico
The life of the Organization of American States' mission to Panama has been prolonged for six weeks, which opens three possibilities in the ongoing regional crisis. First scenario: The four OAS diplomats fail to persuade Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega to relinquish power and leave his country, and the Bush Administration decides that the entire affair is not worth the effort, and simply forgets about Panama. This course may be the wisest; it is certainly not the most likely. Another possibility: The four-man team--the foreign ministers of Ecuador, Guatemala and Trinidad and Tobago, and the secretary general of the OAS--having won an extension of its mandate, drags things out indefinitely.
OPINION
June 1, 2011
Nearly two years after former Honduran President Manuel Zelaya was ousted in a military coup, he returned home Saturday. His arrival clears the way for the Organization of American States to reinstate Honduras, which had been expelled from the group, during a special session Wednesday. Zelaya's return and Wednesday's expected OAS vote mean Honduras will no longer be a pariah in the hemisphere, which rightfully condemned the coup. But it would be a mistake to conclude that the crisis in that country is over.
WORLD
February 3, 2011 | By Allyn Gaestel and Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Facing international pressure, Haiti's electoral council Thursday dropped the ruling party candidate from the presidential runoff, a move expected to ease tensions generated by the disputed first round of voting in November. Election officials said the March 20 runoff would place Mirlande Manigat, a former first lady who received the most votes in the first round, against Michel Martelly, a popular singer known as Sweet Micky who was left out of the runoff when preliminary results were announced in December.
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