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OPINION
June 3, 2009
Cuba was booted out of the Organization of American States in 1962 over Fidel Castro's embrace of Marxism-Leninism and his alignment with the Soviet Union. Today, as OAS foreign ministers meet in Honduras for their annual assembly, two countries are opposed to the island's return to the regional organization: the United States and, apparently, Cuba itself.
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OPINION
March 22, 2008
Re "Anxiety in the Andes," editorial, March 16 The editorial correctly calls on the Organization of American States to play a larger role in the recent crisis among the Andean nations. The U.S. is right to defer to the OAS and focus its efforts on promoting a free-trade agreement with Colombia. Only through open trade can such countries improve economic prosperity and enjoy continued declining support for leftist guerrillas and their drug-trading partners. A greater concern lies with poorer countries such as Bolivia and Ecuador, where poverty leads citizens to support populist leaders.
OPINION
March 16, 2008
For several anxious days this month, the prospect of war in South America was sharp and real. Colombia's bombing of a rebel camp in the jungles of Ecuador roiled tensions not seen for decades in the Andean region. Ecuador rushed troops to its border; Venezuela sent 10 battalions to its frontier; Nicaragua broke diplomatic relations with Colombia.
WORLD
January 6, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez's decision not to renew the license of his nation's largest and oldest television network, a frequent critic of his policies, drew a rebuke Friday from the Organization of American States. OAS Secretary-General Jose Miguel Insulza said in a statement that Chavez acted in an arbitrary manner in yanking the license of RCTV, which began operations in 1953 and has the largest viewership of any network in Venezuela.
WORLD
June 7, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
President Bush urged Western Hemisphere nations Monday to continue their progress toward democracy, even as his administration suffered a setback in its bid to get countries to set democratic standards in the region. Addressing a meeting of the Organization of American States, Bush said the hemisphere had undergone a "dramatic" democratic transformation.
WORLD
June 3, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Latin American leaders are quietly resisting a Bush administration proposal to strengthen democracy in the region, saying they fear it was crafted to target Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. U.S. officials have been trying to persuade the Organization of American States to adopt what they say are standards for democratic government. Diplomats from many countries fear that it is aimed at Chavez, viewed by some as an anti-U.S. leader, and that it also could amount to an invitation for the U.S.
WORLD
May 3, 2005 | From Associated Press
Chilean Interior Minister Jose Miguel Insulza was elected Monday to a five-year term as secretary-general of the Organization of American States. Insulza, 62, is a lawyer and former foreign minister who spent 10 years in exile in Mexico and Italy while Chile was ruled by a military government. Insulza received 31 votes, with Mexico and Bolivia abstaining and Peru casting a blank vote. He will be sworn in May 25.
WORLD
April 30, 2005 | Hector Tobar and Paul Richter, Times Staff Writers
Mexico's foreign minister on Friday withdrew his candidacy to head the Organization of American States, clearing the way for a Chilean backed by left-leaning South American presidents to become its next leader. The announcement by Luis Ernesto Derbez marked the second time in four weeks that a U.S.
WORLD
December 31, 2004 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The race to lead the Organization of American States has narrowed to three candidates, with Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Ernesto Derbez emerging as a somewhat puzzling belated entry. Just a month ago, Derbez was telling reporters that he would be a candidate in Mexico's 2006 presidential election. Then, in a surprising turnabout, President Vicente Fox announced Dec. 7 that he was putting Derbez's hat in the ring for OAS chief. Derbez's bid to be OAS secretary-general may stem as much from internal Mexican politics as from Fox's desire that Mexico play a more important international role.
WORLD
October 9, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The head of the Organization of American States resigned two weeks into his tenure, after allegations that he participated in a bribery scandal involving a French telephone company. Secretary-General Miguel Angel Rodriguez of Costa Rica denies wrongdoing. He will be succeeded by the second-ranking official in the OAS, Luigi Einaudi, an American and a former State Department official.
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