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Oasis Organization

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1991 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Space may be the final frontier, but for the members of OASIS, it's the next best place to live. The group of aerospace engineers, scientists and technicians not only want to boldly go where few people have gone before, they fully hope to move there. The Redondo Beach-based organization, a chapter of the National Space Society, has its eyes set specifically on the moon. Members see it as a vast, untapped resource waiting to be claimed, waiting to be homesteaded and waiting to be developed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Friday night in Hollywood, and teenagers in droves flock to the Oasis, a haven for poor urban kids who have no place to hang out. The attraction is the teen club at the Oasis, a faith-based nonprofit group that has been reaching out to needy youngsters in Hollywood for more than two decades. Jackie Rodriguez, a high school senior, likens the Oasis to her second home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | K. CONNIE KANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's Friday night in Hollywood, and teenagers in droves flock to the Oasis, a haven for poor urban kids who have no place to hang out. The attraction is the teen club at the Oasis, a faith-based nonprofit group that has been reaching out to needy youngsters in Hollywood for more than two decades. Jackie Rodriguez, a high school senior, likens the Oasis to her second home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1991 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Space may be the final frontier, but for the members of OASIS, it's the next best place to live. The group of aerospace engineers, scientists and technicians not only want to boldly go where few people have gone before, they fully hope to move there. The Redondo Beach-based organization, a chapter of the National Space Society, has its eyes set specifically on the moon. Members see it as a vast, untapped resource waiting to be claimed, waiting to be homesteaded and waiting to be developed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1998 | SUE FOX
Waving a cigarette in the air as she preached Zionism, the woman in the somber suit and sensible shoes recalled the tumultuous day she signed the declaration of independence that created the state of Israel. "That's Golda Meir up there," one man said appreciatively. Well, not quite. Beneath the gray-streaked wig, this Golda was a 44-year-old man from Whittier. A former history teacher, Peter M.
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