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SCIENCE
April 22, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Much of what we know about past civilizations in Mexico comes from the writings of colonial Europeans -- Spanish conquerors and priests -- who arrived in the Americas in the 1500s. But archaeological evidence from recent excavations at a site called El Palenque in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, shows that temple precincts similar to the ones the Europeans encountered had existed in the region some 1,500 years earlier. Married archaeologists Elsa Redmond and Charles Spencer, both of the American Museum of Natural History in New York, reported the discoveries Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .  Redmond and Spencer have been studying the remains of ancient civilizations in Oaxaca since the 1970s, when both were undergraduates at Rice University.
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NEWS
February 4, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Ever heard of pechuga , the mezcal from Oaxaca made by suspending a chicken breast ( pechuga ) from the top of the still? Forget about the worm in the bottle. That's just folklore. But this, this is something wild and woolly from the back country. Ron Cooper, the Venice artist and adventurer who jump-started the whole mezcal craze in this country with Del Maguey Single Vineyard Mezcal almost two decades ago, was showing José André's creative director Ruben García the pechuga process at the village of Santa Catarina Minas.
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NEWS
June 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Residents of this southern state have the highest illiteracy rate in Mexico, Gov. Heladio Ramirez Lopez told the federal education secretary at a conference here. He said about 18% of the people in Oaxaca, one of the poorest and most heavily Indian states in Mexico, cannot read or write. The average level of education is just over four years, he said.
WORLD
December 14, 2013 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- Eleven people were found slain Saturday  in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, in a rural area riven by political and agrarian disputes, though the motive for the killings was not immediately clear. The bodies were discovered in the morning in the municipality of Santiago Juxtlahuaca, on the western side of the state, about a six-hour drive southeast of Mexico City. Ten burned bodies were found in a Chevrolet Suburban, and the 11th was found a few yards away with a gunshot wound in the head.
TRAVEL
June 18, 2006
JENNA DOSCH went on a photography class trip to Oaxaca, Mexico, in March and came back with this piece for her portfolio. Returning one afternoon from a nearby monastery, she was serenaded by the man with the guitar on the bus and took his picture with a Nikon D2X. "I like this one because it brought me back there," said Dosch, who just graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. "I can hear the guy playing the music."
WORLD
October 31, 2006 | Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writer
The state capital remained divided Monday, as thousands marched in defiance and others praised government forces that dislodged a protest encampment from the city center this weekend. The recovery of the plaza by federal police late Sunday marked a symbolic end to the five-month occupation by striking teachers and leftist supporters who are demanding that the state governor resign. But it remains unclear when the tourist capital will return to normal.
TRAVEL
November 8, 2009 | Amanda Jones
With news of drug-related violence and H1N1 flu in the headlines, tourism to Mexico has plummeted. But the truth is the violence is largely regional and the swine flu is no longer confined to here. Many places in Mexico are inexpensive, kid-friendly and sunny. Here are some of my family's recent favorites. Sayulita, Nayarit Once a fishing village, Sayulita has become a haunt for surfers, bohemians and vacationers who want to avoid the crowds. It's just an hour's drive from Puerto Vallarta on Mexico's west coast.
WORLD
May 1, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
By the time she reached the hospital, Adela Gutierrez was gasping for breath, the tips of her fingers blue. She had been sick for several days, had seen a couple of neighborhood doctors, but by the Thursday before Easter her condition was grave. Gutierrez was admitted into intensive care at Oaxaca's main state-run hospital, but four days later she died. She would eventually be identified as the first fatality in Mexico of the unique strain of swine flu now being found across the globe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
For Joseph Hall, the chance to participate in a teacher education program in the southwest Mexican city of Oaxaca was to be the highlight of his pursuit of a bilingual teaching credential. The Cal State Sacramento graduate student had given notice at his job in preparation for the five-month study abroad program that was to begin in July. But Hall and students from several other campuses may not get the chance after California State University system Chancellor Charles B. Reed declined to lift a ban on university-sponsored research and study in Mexico.
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Irma Lopez, a Mazatec Indian, waited to receive attention at a medical clinic in Oaxaca, but her labor pains became overwhelming. Spurned by the nurses, she retreated outdoors - and abruptly gave birth to a baby boy on the hospital lawn. A few days later, it was revealed that two other pregnant indigenous women had also been turned away from Oaxaca hospitals, one of whom also delivered on the lawn, and that a fourth woman had been forced to have her baby on the reception floor at a hospital in Puebla.
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - Irma Lopez, a Mazatec Indian, waited to receive attention at a medical clinic in Oaxaca, but her labor pains became overwhelming. Spurned by the nurses, she retreated outdoors - and abruptly gave birth to a baby boy on the hospital lawn. A few days later, it was revealed that two other pregnant indigenous women had also been turned away from Oaxaca hospitals, one of whom also delivered on the lawn, and that a fourth woman had been forced to have her baby on the reception floor at a hospital in Puebla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2013 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Returning to his native Mexican village after many years, the artist was startled by what he didn't see. "Where are my friends, my relatives?" Alejandro Santiago asked the remaining residents of the town, Teococuilco de Marcos Perez, in a remote mountain area of Oaxaca state. Upon learning that most of them migrated from southern Mexico to the United States in search of work, he vowed to honor the departed and "repopulate" his impoverished hometown. Around 2002, he began to sculpt the first of hundreds of strangely poignant, human-looking ceramic figures and planned to place them around the village.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Much of what we know about past civilizations in Mexico comes from the writings of colonial Europeans -- Spanish conquerors and priests -- who arrived in the Americas in the 1500s. But archaeological evidence from recent excavations at a site called El Palenque in the Valley of Oaxaca, Mexico, shows that temple precincts similar to the ones the Europeans encountered had existed in the region some 1,500 years earlier. Married archaeologists Elsa Redmond and Charles Spencer, both of the American Museum of Natural History in New York, reported the discoveries Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences .  Redmond and Spencer have been studying the remains of ancient civilizations in Oaxaca since the 1970s, when both were undergraduates at Rice University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
For Joseph Hall, the chance to participate in a teacher education program in the southwest Mexican city of Oaxaca was to be the highlight of his pursuit of a bilingual teaching credential. The Cal State Sacramento graduate student had given notice at his job in preparation for the five-month study abroad program that was to begin in July. But Hall and students from several other campuses may not get the chance after California State University system Chancellor Charles B. Reed declined to lift a ban on university-sponsored research and study in Mexico.
WORLD
December 23, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Mexican officials said Wednesday that they are investigating the reported mass kidnapping of 50 Central American migrants, a day after declaring that no such incident took place. The turnabout could head off possible diplomatic frictions. The National Institute of Migration said Commissioner Salvador Beltran del Rio was in touch with representatives of El Salvador and Honduras, which have drawn attention to the alleged Dec. 16 kidnapping in the southern state of Oaxaca. Mexico's human rights commission opened its own investigation, saying it had heard from 18 migrants who said they witnessed the abductions.
WORLD
September 28, 2010 | By Daniel Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
A landslide swept a village in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca while residents slept and engulfed at least 100 homes, trapping and possibly killing at least 400 people, state authorities said (link in Spanish). Some estimates put the number of victims much higher. The landslide hit the town of Santa Maria Tlahuitoltepec, in mountains to the east of Oaxaca City, at around 4 a.m. local time, Gov. Ulises Ruiz told the Televisa network. Rescuers and news media scrambling to get to the remote area were being hampered by spotty communications and poor roads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2013 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Returning to his native Mexican village after many years, the artist was startled by what he didn't see. "Where are my friends, my relatives?" Alejandro Santiago asked the remaining residents of the town, Teococuilco de Marcos Perez, in a remote mountain area of Oaxaca state. Upon learning that most of them migrated from southern Mexico to the United States in search of work, he vowed to honor the departed and "repopulate" his impoverished hometown. Around 2002, he began to sculpt the first of hundreds of strangely poignant, human-looking ceramic figures and planned to place them around the village.
TRAVEL
November 28, 2004
I was disturbed by "To Market, to Market in Oaxaca" [Nov. 14]. It was a primer in bad planning and having a poor disposition for traveling. Oaxaca, Mexico, is one of the most magical places I have visited, a beautiful colonial city with great historical and archeological sites. The Juarez Market, which writer Kevin Brass refers to as "Wal-Mart," is a treasure chest of food, crafts and everyday necessities. Each time I go there I am lost in the sights, sounds and aromas. He seemed to miss all this.
WORLD
July 6, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Political parties across the spectrum looked for ways to claim bragging rights Monday after gubernatorial elections in a dozen states yielded surprises but no clear overall victor. With results still being tallied, the outcome so far offered something of a boost to President Felipe Calderon, whose conservative party avoided an embarrassing sweep by joining with leftist parties in several key states. Those oil-and-water alliances stunned the surging Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, in two states it has long ruled: Oaxaca and Puebla.
TRAVEL
November 8, 2009 | By Amanda Jones
With news of drug-related violence and H1N1 flu in the headlines, tourism to Mexico has plummeted. But the truth is the violence is largely regional and the swine flu is no longer confined to here. Many places in Mexico are inexpensive, kid-friendly and sunny. Here are some of my family's recent favorites. Sayulita, Nayarit Once a fishing village, Sayulita has become a haunt for surfers, bohemians and vacationers who want to avoid the crowds. It's just an hour's drive from Puerto Vallarta on Mexico's west coast.
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