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Oaxaca Mexico

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2006 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
If you are having trouble getting your hands on fresh spinach these days, you may be able to commiserate with the owners of Mexican restaurants serving cuisine from the state of Oaxaca. Political unrest in the southern Mexico region has translated into U.S. shortages of imported traditional staples, among them fried grasshoppers, spicy mole paste and crunchy tortillas known as tlayudas.
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TRAVEL
May 17, 1998 | MONA MOLARSKY, Molarsky is a New York-based writer on travel and the arts
Street lamps spread their light over the cobblestones as the sun sank into the Sierra Madre. It was our first evening in Oaxaca, and our family was headed for the Zocalo, the central plaza. Sweethearts strolled arm-in-arm down the avenue, the picture of contentment, but I was anxious. We'd been in Oaxaca just three hours, and I worried about whether my husband and daughter would like it. In the weeks leading up to our trip last August, it had been the subject of much debate.
WORLD
October 12, 2006 | From Reuters
Masked protesters hijacked buses and forced government workers from offices Wednesday, despite a tentative agreement this week to curb their actions while a federal Senate commission studies whether Oaxaca state Gov. Ulises Ruiz has lost control. The group of about 100 demonstrators was shot at as it roamed Oaxaca city, the capital, in the hijacked public buses, and protest leaders said one demonstrator was wounded.
WORLD
December 6, 2006 | Hector Tobar and Sam Enriquez, Times Staff Writers
Mexican federal police were holding Flavio Sosa, the self-styled rebel and leader of Oaxaca's protest movement, in a maximum-security prison Tuesday after detaining him hours before he was to meet with negotiators for another federal agency.
TRAVEL
August 28, 1994 | ROCKY BEHR, Behr leads crafts tours to Mexico and is the owner of The Folk Tree , a store specializing in Mexican crafts , in Pasadena
For me, Mexico's biggest lure is the ingenuity and inventiveness of its people, particularly its artisans. Over more than a quarter century of travels south of the border, I've amassed a large personal and professional collection of Mexican folk art. Most of my five or six visits a year have centered around small villages, some a quick detour from established tourist towns and others accessible only by long drives on unmarked, unpaved roads.
WORLD
October 29, 2006 | Sam Enriquez and Reed Johnson, Times Staff Writers
Federal riot police and soldiers toting shields and automatic weapons massed around this beleaguered colonial city Saturday in a bid to end a five-month standoff between striking teachers and supporters of state Gov. Ulises Ruiz, amid escalating violence that included the Friday shooting deaths of a U.S. journalist and two Mexican men.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2006 | John Muncie, Special to The Times
IT'S all about the worm. A scrum of tourists rushed the tasting bar of Mezcal Beneva's restaurant-distillery Rancho Zapata, just a few yards from the kilometer 42.5 marker on the Oaxaca-Istmo highway. Eighteen-year-old Marisol Reyes had just given us a guided tour of the distillery, called a palenque in Spanish. She told us about the agave plants and how they're harvested and cooked. We watched a donkey drag a huge stone wheel round and round a track crushing agave pulp.
WORLD
May 5, 2009 | Tracy Wilkinson
It was Easter weekend when people in Oaxaca noticed strange happenings at the state-run Dr. Aurelio Valdivieso General Hospital. Sections were suddenly off-limits. Security guards were added. The cop reporter at the local newspaper, El Diario Despertar, got a tip from a source at the hospital. Not above dressing its journalists up as paramedics, the paper sent two people to investigate. They quickly realized that the hospital was seized by alarm.
WORLD
July 24, 2007 | Rafael Bucio and Hector Tobar, Special to The Times
Angry protests, tight security and empty hotel rooms marked the celebration Monday of Guelaguetza, a folk festival that is traditionally the biggest tourist draw of the year in this city dependent on the money visitors spend here. A year ago, protests forced the cancellation of Guelaguetza. This month, a new round of violent demonstrations over the rule of Oaxaca state Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2006 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
When Oaxacan immigrants came to Los Angeles in the early 1970s, they settled in what's now known as Pico-Union and Koreatown. One of the few things they brought with them was a love of basketball that borders on obsession. This is especially true among Zapotec Indians from the Oaxacan mountain range known as the Sierra Juarez in southern Mexico. "Our fever," Otomi Dominguez, a highland Zapotec, calls the sport.
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