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FOOD
June 14, 2006 | Leslie Brenner, Times Staff Writer
THE grasshoppers aren't on the menu, but they're fabulous -- tiny, crunchy and flavorful, garnished with wedges of lime. With a Bohemia or Negra Modelo, the frosty mug rimmed with a salty spice mix (secret ingredient: crushed, dried mescal worms), it's an auspicious start to lunch or dinner. Perhaps you don't get a kick out of munching on grasshoppers, or chapulines.
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NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
Recently, I was invited to a friend's house in Patzcuaro (Michoacan), Mexico , and we spent the week madly cooking. The market there was so fantastic --  fat yellow chickens, fresh chayote, baby jicama, a rainbow of fresh and dried chiles, heaps of garlic and herbs. Indian women sat with produce from their gardens on blankets in front of them. They always had the freshest ingredients, including hand-patted corn tortillas, and when things were slow, they'd trim the thorns from nopales (cactus paddles)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Rolando Zaragoza, 21, was 15 years old when he came to the United States, enrolled in an Oxnard school and first heard the term " Oaxaquita. " Little Oaxacan, it means - and it was not used kindly. "Sometimes I didn't want to go to school," he said. "Sometimes I stayed to fight. " "It kind of seemed that being from Oaxaca was something bad," said Israel Vasquez, 23, who shared the same mocking, "just the way people use ' Oaxaquita ' to refer to anyone who is short and has dark skin.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Chinese on Sunset: A Chinese restaurant for the Sunset Boulevard set is expected to open this spring from Innovative Dining Group , the name behind Sushi Roku, BOA and Katana. Chi-Lin will open in April next to IDG's latest, RivaBella (a collaboration with Gino Angelini that debuted in January). IDG says it has partnered with Cecile Tang of Joss, and Studio Collective is designing the space. How to get into Koreatown speakeasy Lock & Key New drinks at Freddy's: Pico Boulevard gastropub Freddy Smalls in West L.A. has a new bar director, Johan Stein, who formerly worked at Red Medicine and Sotto.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | Betty Hallock
Call it the summer of Bricia Lopez. There she was at the L.A. Street Food Fest serving up her mom's Oaxacan tamales and mini- cemitas . There she was at Guelaguetza during the World Cup, pouring shots of mezcal and passing 'round the micheladas . After last weekend's Korean BBQ Cook-Off in Koreatown, she plied a crowd with arroz con leche and cinnamon-tinged coffee. You're bound to bump into her at an underground dinner, the latest restaurant, or at any of the bars where she has inspired bartenders to name cocktails after her, from the "Sweet Bricia" at 320 Main in Seal Beach to the "Brisa de Oaxaca" at La Descarga in Hollywood.
NEWS
March 4, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Chinese on Sunset: A Chinese restaurant for the Sunset Boulevard set is expected to open this spring from Innovative Dining Group , the name behind Sushi Roku, BOA and Katana. Chi-Lin will open in April next to IDG's latest, RivaBella (a collaboration with Gino Angelini that debuted in January). IDG says it has partnered with Cecile Tang of Joss, and Studio Collective is designing the space. How to get into Koreatown speakeasy Lock & Key New drinks at Freddy's: Pico Boulevard gastropub Freddy Smalls in West L.A. has a new bar director, Johan Stein, who formerly worked at Red Medicine and Sotto.
FOOD
December 16, 2001 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When friends ask what I'm cooking for Christmas, the answer will be almendrado de pollo, not roast turkey. Mexican Christmas dinners are a tradition in my house. It's fun to hunt out interesting new recipes and to shop for ingredients and decorations while traveling. This year's itinerary took me to from Mexico City to Puebla, then out to the gulf coast of Veracruz and over to Oaxaca--areas so rich in cuisine that I came back overloaded with ideas for dinner.
FOOD
April 29, 1998 | BARBARA HANSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steven Ravago stocks the kitchen of his San Diego home with worms. Not ordinary garden worms but dried, smoked gusanos de maguey from Oaxaca that are the secret to his terrific, smoky salsa. "Everyone says that's the weirdest ingredient I have," says Ravago, head chef at Sweet Lew's Barbeque in La Jolla. He doesn't use the worms for his restaurant cooking, of course. At Sweet Lew's, he confines himself to Southern dishes--catfish fritters, black-eyed peas, sweet potato pie and lots of barbecue.
FOOD
May 28, 2012 | By Bill Esparza, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rocio Camacho was catapulted into mole fame when she started cooking at Moles La Tia in East Los Angeles, where her moles ran the gamut from traditional Pueblan and Oaxacan varieties to unconventional riffs on the genre — say, passion fruit, beets with hibiscus flower, or coffee. Now she has opened Mole de los Dioses ("mole from the gods") in two locations, dashing between the pair of restaurants daily to turn out her devotional cuisine. It's no surprise that Camacho facilely commands the most baroque of the mole genre: a 27-ingredient mole poblano with dark chiles, nuts, seeds and a little sweetness from raisins.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA
Spiritual. Mysterious. Cosmic. And, si, mucho color. That's how Mexican-born artist Laura Hernandez--a Frida Kahlo look-alike--describes her work on exhibit at the newly inaugurated main gallery at the Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach. Nearly 850 of the artist's fans attended the exhibit's opening night earlier this month to ooh and aah over the show, called "Omnia: A Trip Into the Realm of Myth and Dreams," which explores the ancient Mayan culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
SANTA ANA DEL VALLE, Mexico - Isaias Garcia had labored for decades to raise a family in Torrance when in 2009, the Zapotec Indian faced a life-changing decision. The authorities of his family village of Santa Ana del Valle in the state of Oaxaca had called him home to serve without pay as a councilman for three years. If he refused, they could confiscate his property - a house and nine acres - under a centuries-old system of local Indian governance known as usos y costumbres (uses and customs)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
Long isolated and discriminated against in their native Mexico, L.A.'s Oaxacan Indian community is trying to reach out to America. The group is moving its annual festival, known as the Guelaguetza , from Pico-Union near downtown to Lincoln Park on the Eastside. It's a small change — a matter of just a few miles — but one that the festival's Oaxacan organizers say shows their eagerness to break out of their insular world. "It's not an area [Oaxacan] people know. In East L.A., it's Hispanic, but not Oaxacan," said Arturo Aguilar, a baker who has participated in the festival for the last 10 years.
FOOD
May 28, 2012 | By Bill Esparza, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Rocio Camacho was catapulted into mole fame when she started cooking at Moles La Tia in East Los Angeles, where her moles ran the gamut from traditional Pueblan and Oaxacan varieties to unconventional riffs on the genre — say, passion fruit, beets with hibiscus flower, or coffee. Now she has opened Mole de los Dioses ("mole from the gods") in two locations, dashing between the pair of restaurants daily to turn out her devotional cuisine. It's no surprise that Camacho facilely commands the most baroque of the mole genre: a 27-ingredient mole poblano with dark chiles, nuts, seeds and a little sweetness from raisins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel, Los Angeles Times
Rolando Zaragoza, 21, was 15 years old when he came to the United States, enrolled in an Oxnard school and first heard the term " Oaxaquita. " Little Oaxacan, it means - and it was not used kindly. "Sometimes I didn't want to go to school," he said. "Sometimes I stayed to fight. " "It kind of seemed that being from Oaxaca was something bad," said Israel Vasquez, 23, who shared the same mocking, "just the way people use ' Oaxaquita ' to refer to anyone who is short and has dark skin.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | Betty Hallock
Call it the summer of Bricia Lopez. There she was at the L.A. Street Food Fest serving up her mom's Oaxacan tamales and mini- cemitas . There she was at Guelaguetza during the World Cup, pouring shots of mezcal and passing 'round the micheladas . After last weekend's Korean BBQ Cook-Off in Koreatown, she plied a crowd with arroz con leche and cinnamon-tinged coffee. You're bound to bump into her at an underground dinner, the latest restaurant, or at any of the bars where she has inspired bartenders to name cocktails after her, from the "Sweet Bricia" at 320 Main in Seal Beach to the "Brisa de Oaxaca" at La Descarga in Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2010 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
The Santa Monica strip dotted with record studios and upscale condos looks nothing like the home they left behind. No fields abundant with agave. No central plaza. No prehistoric ruins. Still, on a recent weekend Oaxacans traveled here from as far away as Washington and Utah to celebrate. They marched down Colorado Boulevard, blew their trumpets, balanced giant baskets of chrysanthemums on their heads and danced in gold brocade and velvet. "We're supposed to have fireworks, too, but the city's safety code won't allow it," said Cindy Cruz, 26, as she followed the small procession.
MAGAZINE
November 9, 1997 | S. Irene Virbila
On late sunday mornings, I sometimes like to breakfast at Guelaguetza, a wonderful authentic Oaxacan restaurant on 8th Street in Koreatown. It's companionable, sitting at one end of a communal table, enjoying Soledad Lopez's superlative huevos rancheros or eggs scrambled with chorizo or tomato and jalapenos. Families stop in after Mass for pan de yema, an eggy sweet bread that's dipped in big cups of cinnamon-laced Mexican chocolate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The Mixtecs and Zapotecs were among the great peoples of pre-Columbian Mexico. They lived in what is today the state of Oaxaca, where Mexico's Pacific Coast curves to face south. Today, despite conquistadors, colonialism and revolution, Mixtecs, Zapotecs and a melange of now-related groups survive in their homeland. They still practice customs and crafts that date back to at least 1500 BC. They are living history.
FOOD
March 4, 2010 | By C. Thi Nguyen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A lot of folks will probably compare the newly minted Slaw Dogs with the year-old Fab Dogs, the anointed champion of the Southern California hot dog scene. After all, they're both trying to kick an old American street-food classic up to the next level. But where Fab Dogs takes the cultural anthropologists' approach, meticulously re-creating New Jersey rippers and Coney Island dogs down to the last detail, the Slaw Dogs is the shock of the new. Fab Dogs mostly expresses its seriousness with a reverence for tradition; Slaw Dogs subjects America's humblest food to the free play of the imagination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2009 | Hector Becerra
For years, relatives of Zeferino Garcia in Mexico's Oaxaca state routinely sent him a cargo of quesillo cheese by airplane. From Tijuana, the bulk of unpasteurized cheese would be brought to his restaurant and two stores in Los Angeles. Life was good, he thought, and tasty. "If you don't have quesillo from Oaxaca, you practically can't have a Oaxacan restaurant," said Garcia, 43. Then three months ago, a health inspector first came to his store and told him he was breaking the law by selling unlicensed, unpasteurized cheese.
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