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Obama Presidency

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September 11, 2009 | JAMES RAINEY
The cable TV channels fired their screeching engines hours in advance. A "Health Care Make or Break Moment" screamed a CNN headline. Countdown clocks at Fox and MSNBC ticked inexorably toward 00:00, the moment when President Obama would face down a joint session of Congress. This had to be really, really big, I learned all day Wednesday from the excitable people on cable TV -- a speech that likely would determine the fate of healthcare reform and, perhaps, the Obama presidency.
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WORLD
March 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - Planned as a springtime tour with a modest itinerary - affording time to chat with the pope, admire the Rembrandts and take in the Colosseum - President Obama's weeklong trip to Europe instead has become a high-stakes test of whether he can move the continent's leaders into a tougher response to Russia's annexation of Crimea. Obama will huddle Monday in Amsterdam with other members of the G-7, seeking a strategy against what many see as the most threatening European land grab since World War II. He will have to navigate disagreements among the European nations over how far to go, and the price they are willing to pay, to sanction Russia for seizing the peninsula from Ukraine.
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OPINION
February 3, 2008
Democrats preparing to vote in Tuesday's California primary can mark their ballots with confidence, knowing that either candidate would make a strong nominee and, if elected, a groundbreaking leader and capable president. But just because the ballot features two strong candidates does not mean that it is difficult to choose between them.
WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey, Paul Richter and Henry Chu
WASHINGTON - The U.S. and Russian presidents imposed sanctions on each other's top aides and other government officials Thursday as the dispute over Crimea intensified and the White House worried publicly that Moscow might be positioning its military to seize more of Ukraine. Denouncing Russia's annexation of Crimea, President Obama said the Treasury Department would freeze any U.S. assets of 20 prominent Russians - including several officials close to President Vladimir Putin, some of the country's wealthiest businessmen - and a Moscow bank that gives financial support to the Russian leadership.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2010 | By Tom Hamburger and Kim Geiger, Tribune Washington Bureau
When he ran for president, Barack Obama attacked the George W. Bush administration for putting political concerns ahead of science on such issues as climate change and public health. And during his first weeks in the White House, President Obama ordered his advisors to develop rules to "guarantee scientific integrity throughout the executive branch." Many government scientists hailed the president's pronouncement. But a year and a half later, no such rules have been issued. Now scientists charge that the Obama administration is not doing enough to reverse a culture that they contend allowed officials to interfere with their work and limit their ability to speak out. "We are getting complaints from government scientists now at the same rate we were during the Bush administration," said Jeffrey Ruch, an activist lawyer who heads an organization representing scientific whistle-blowers.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2008
Regarding Tom Petruno's column "Obama and the Fear Factor," Nov. 8: This column focuses on the conjecture and politically biased fears of Wall Street Republicans. But inexplicably buried in the commentary was this briefest of truths about how Wall Street may very well fare under Obama: "Whatever else Clinton did, he wasn't bad for stocks in the '90s." "Wasn't bad?" Obama's economic plans are similar to Clinton's, and this is how the Dow Jones industrials fared on an annualized basis under recent presidents: Reagan, 11.4% gain; George H.W. Bush, 11.8% gain, Clinton, 16.6% gain.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
What's a state dinner without the Big Dance? President Obama is scheduled to share one of his greatest passions with David Cameron during the British prime minister's visit to the United States next week: college hoops. Obama plans to travel with Cameron to Dayton, Ohio, on Tuesday night to take in an opening-round game in the men's NCAA basketball tournament, the White House confirmed. The NCAA tournament -- known as March Madness -- has become a fixture of the Obama presidency.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Since the start of the year, Steve Erickson has been blogging the presidential race at the American Prospect, and if you're not election-ed out, or so stressed that you can't read another word about the voting, his closing post, “The President as Metaphor,” is a profound and subtle look at why this matters so much. Erickson, of course, is an astute political observer, the author of two books of campaign reporting, “Leap Year” and “American Nomad,” in addition to his nine novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2009 | David L. Ulin
Writers are contrarians. Ask a group of them a simple question -- What might the presidency of Barack Obama mean for literature and culture? -- and you get a range of answers, from the high-minded to the tongue-in-cheek. You get essays, riffs, wishes for the future as well as reflections on the past and what it has meant.
NEWS
March 12, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- The House passed the first of a pair of bills aimed at reining in what Republicans call a pattern of overreach by the executive branch under President Obama . Democrats decried the base-pleasing measure as a political stunt. Immigration reform advocates said it threatens the administration's deferred action deportation program. The legislation is a response to what Republicans say has been an "imperial presidency" under Obama -- a term that one conservative lawmaker noted also fit the Nixon administration during the Watergate scandal.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - A year after his reelection triumph, President Obama is facing an awkward question from friends and foes alike: Why can't he run the government as well as he ran his campaign? What with the IRS targeting of tea party groups; the poor security at the U.S. mission in Benghazi, Libya; the eavesdropping on close allies; and the botched rollout of the landmark healthcare law, Obama increasingly seems to be battling top-level management failures as much as policy or political problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
TORONTO - Watching Steve McQueen's achingly brilliant "12 Years a Slave" at the Toronto International Film Festival, I was struck by many things. The film's artistry - script, performances, imagery - is significant. The movie is beautifully, painfully wrought at every turn. But in a larger sense, it stands as a striking testament to how much the texture and tenor of conversations about race have changed through the prism of film in the years since Barack Obama took office. Quite simply there are more movies that specifically address black-white friction in modern terms - the many shades of human interaction more starkly framed by the color of one's skin.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2013 | By David Horsey
At dinner a couple of days ago, my friend Janey Ireson said how disappointed she is that Barack Obama has been hemmed in by congressional Republicans and blocked from fulfilling the high expectations of those who supported his rise to the presidency. The next day at lunch, another friend, Colin Gray, expressed precisely the same sentiment. One would expect to find such feelings of frustration among the half of Americans who cast ballots for Obama in 2008 and 2012, but Janey and Colin are not U.S. voters.
OPINION
June 11, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
The contradictions at the heart of the Obama presidency are finally out in the open. As a result, a man who came into office hellbent on restoring faith in government is on the verge of inspiring a libertarian revival. There have always been (at least) two Barack Obamas. There is the man who claims to be a nonideological problem-solver, keen on working with anybody to fix things. And there is The One: the partisan, left-leaning progressive-redeemer. As E.J. Dionne, a columnist who can usually be counted on to make the case for Obama better than Obama can, recently wrote, the president "has been a master, as good politicians are, at presenting different sides of himself to different constituencies.
WORLD
June 8, 2013 | By Christi Parsons and Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
RANCHO MIRAGE, Calif. - President Obama and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, wrapped up a summit at this sweltering California desert resort Saturday after nearly eight hours of talks over two days and a candle-lit dinner aimed at shaping what both leaders called a "new model" of future relations. The meetings grew contentious Saturday morning when Obama pushed Xi to do more to curb Chinese cyber attacks on U.S. businesses and infrastructure. Obama argued the alleged hacking was "inconsistent with the kind of relationship we want to have with China," according to Tom Donilon, the president's national security advisor.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Kim Geiger and Seema Mehta
Mitt Romney drew criticism Monday after he failed to challenge a questioner who suggested at a campaign event that President Obama should be tried for treason. The woman, in posing a question to Romney, asserted, “We have a president right now that is operating outside the structure of our Constitution.” She was interrupted by applause from the crowd. “I want to know," she said before turning to another audience member and saying, “Yeah, I do agree he should be tried for treason.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Peter Nicholas, Washington Bureau
Since the release of Ron Suskind's new book, “Confidence Men,"  White House officials have sought to disparage his reporting and paint the book as an unfair depiction of the Obama presidency. And yet someone in Obama's orbit opened an important door for the author: Suskind landed an interview with the president. A White House advisor said Thursday the sit-down with Obama was an attempt to alter the “trajectory" of the book -- to let Obama provide a corrective to any misleading bits of information Suskind might have heard.
NATIONAL
March 12, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
First Lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck were among a high-powered roster of public figures whose personal and financial information was posted on the Internet. The data, which include purported home addresses, Social Security numbers, phone numbers and credit reports, appeared on a website that seemed to originate in Russia. The Secret Service and the FBI said Tuesday that they were opening investigations, and President Obama confirmed the apparent breach.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Since the start of the year, Steve Erickson has been blogging the presidential race at the American Prospect, and if you're not election-ed out, or so stressed that you can't read another word about the voting, his closing post, “The President as Metaphor,” is a profound and subtle look at why this matters so much. Erickson, of course, is an astute political observer, the author of two books of campaign reporting, “Leap Year” and “American Nomad,” in addition to his nine novels.
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