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Obama S Plan

NEWS
September 1, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey, This post has been updated, as noted below.
URBANDALE, Iowa - President Obama ripped the GOP's recently wrapped convention as a “rerun” and a throwback to an earlier time, as he kicked off a campaign tour Saturday leading up to his nomination next week. “We'd seen it before,” Obama told a crowd estimated by local officials at 10,000 people. “You might as well have watched it on a black-and-white TV.” The president has repeatedly sought to cast GOP nominee Mitt Romney as out of touch and the Republican Party as trying to revive old policies.
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NEWS
August 23, 2011 | By Kim Geiger and Maeve Reston
After taking months of heat from both political parties for its decision to assist in a NATO-led mission in Libya, the Obama administration was not only pleased with the results but also eager to tout the strategy, crediting it with weakening Moammar Kadafi's forces over time while giving rebel forces time to regroup. And the administration offered a response to criticism that Obama's plan lacked an endgame in Libya: “Six months is not a long time to bring down a 42-year dictatorship,” said Ben Rhodes, Obama's deputy national security advisor for strategic communications, in a telephone interview.    “Over time, all the pressure on Kadafi built up because we were destroying his forces on the ground while denying him ability to replenish them, so he was getting steadily weaker and at the same time the opposition was getting better organized,” Rhodes said.
NEWS
September 14, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
President Obama continued to stump for his jobs plan Wednesday, traveling to the battleground state of North Carolina and again suggesting that he will blame a failure by Congress to pass the package squarely on Republicans. The president told a crowd of about 8,000 at North Carolina State University in Raleigh that the GOP was resisting the plan, in part, because Republicans don't want to “give me a win” in advance of the 2012 elections. “Give me a win? Give me a break!
NEWS
July 10, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - A proposal to extend lower interest rates for some federal student loans failed for the second time in the Senate on Wednesday, putting new pressure on Democrats to reach a compromise on the issue. A unanimous bloc of Republicans, joined by West Virginia Democrat Joe Manchin and independent Angus King of Maine, voted against a procedural step that would have allowed the approach favored by Senate Democratic leaders to move forward. Their bill would reinstate for one year the 3.4% interest rate for subsidized Stafford loans that expired June 30. With no action in Congress so far, the rate has doubled to 6.8%.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama said Wednesday that he would reject any Republican effort to tie a long-term budget deal to a vote to increase the debt ceiling, saying such a strategy would be a threat to the recovering economy. “That is a bad strategy for America, it's a bad strategy for your businesses, and it is not a game that I will play,” Obama told a group of business leaders gathered for a meeting of the Business Roundtable. The president was reacting to reports that Republicans on the Hill are considering a new way out of their standoff with the president over a massive set of tax rates and spending cuts set to take effect in the new year.
NEWS
January 4, 2012 | By Seema Mehta
Mitt Romney and John McCain have a history of tense relations dating back to their vicious battle for the 2008 GOP presidential nomination, but any hard feelings appear to have been put aside as McCain endorsed Romney on Wednesday to be the party's nominee to take on President Obama. “It's with some nostalgia that I return to this place that I love so well,” said McCain, a popular figure in New Hampshire who twice won GOP presidential primaries here. “I'm really here for one reason and one reason only and that is to make sure we make Mitt Romney the next president of the United States of America.
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By David S. Cloud, This post has been corrected. See note at bottom for details.
WASHINGTON - Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and House Republicans raised doubts Sunday about President Obama's plan to restrict the federal government's ability to collect data on domestic telephone calls, saying that private phone companies do not want the responsibility and would not be subject to oversight. "The whole purpose of this program is to provide instantaneous information to be able to disrupt any plot that may be taking place," Feinstein said on NBC's "Meet the Press.
NEWS
August 17, 2012 | By David Lauter
Before the presidential campaign hurtles off to the next skirmish, take a moment to notice what happened this week: Mitt Romney vowed to increase the national debt by $716 billion, and no one so much as blinked. Romney's handling of the $716 billion in Medicare cost cuts comes close to being a perfect example of why federal spending so seldom gets cut - everyone favors restraining government spending in theory, but voters seldom love it in practice. To recap: As part of the Obama health reform law, Congress voted to reduce payments to certain hospitals, insurance companies and other healthcare providers by about $716 billion over the next 10 years.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- President Obama's proposed mix of tax hikes and spending cuts would reduce future budget deficits more quickly than under current laws, according to a report issued Friday that could rekindle the dormant budget wars in Washington. The outlook from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office comes as the government is set to reach its debt limit on Saturday, forcing the White House and Congress back to the negotiating table to work out a long-term budget plan that raises taxes, cuts spending -- or some combination of the two. Already, Washington is on track to have a substantially lower deficit -- $642 billion -- this fiscal year than experts had expected, the budget office reported earlier this week.
WORLD
September 10, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - By providing a way to avert a U.S. military strike, Russia's proposal that Syria surrender its chemical weapons has offered a host of world leaders an exit from an increasingly damaging political crisis. The plan, which is expected to be hashed out in the United Nations over the next week or longer, has quickly gained supporters in Europe, the Middle East and the U.S. Congress. Despite numerous complications and likely setbacks ahead, the idea has gained momentum because it offers major advantages for each of those parties.
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