Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsObese People
IN THE NEWS

Obese People

SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | Mary MacVean
Are the millions of dollars spent to try to reverse childhood obesity a good investment? One answer might be found in the cost if the condition goes unchecked: about $19,000 per obese child in lifetime medical costs, researchers reported Monday. That's $14 billion just for the obese 10-year-olds in the United States, according to researchers at the Duke Global Health Institute and the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore. They reported their results in the journal Pediatrics.
Advertisement
HEALTH
August 1, 2005 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
It's familiar news by now that America's obesity epidemic is both dangerous and costly. Obesity significantly increases the risk of many diseases, including heart disease and diabetes, and is associated with at least 112,000 deaths a year. The economic impact is equally startling: Obese patients add an estimated $75 billion a year to the nation's medical bill.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By David Zucchino and Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Here's another health risk associated with carrying extra pounds: People who are obese get less protection from the annual flu shot, according to a study released Tuesday. But the authors said that people who are overweight or obese should get a seasonal flu shot anyway. The study involved 461 patients who were vaccinated in 2009 at a clinic in Chapel Hill, N.C. By several measures, the vaccine appeared to wear off faster in people who were overweight or obese than it did in people of healthy weight.  For instance, 11 months after getting a flu shot, the level of flu antibodies in the blood had dropped by a factor of four in 25% of the healthy-weight subjects.
SCIENCE
July 16, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
This week through July 24, about 40,000 Boy Scouts and their leaders are descending on a vast encampment in the hills of southern West Virginia to engage in traditional Boy Scout pastimes - hiking, shooting, repelling, orienteering, swimming, canoeing and fishing - and in a slate of more extreme physical activities such as mountain biking, skateboarding and rock climbing. Fat Scouts, however, need not apply. Citing the physical demands of the quadrennial Jamboree and the organization's ideals of physical fitness, the Boy Scouts this year announced that Scouts or Scout leaders with a body mass index, or BMI, above 40 - the point at which one is medically labeled “severely obese” - may not attend.
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Overweight and obese young adults may be known by the company they keep--other overweight and obese people. But if those friends and family members are trying to lose weight, they could be a good influence. How social groups influence our health was the subject of a 2007 New England Journal of Medicine study that found that people who had close friends who were fat might triple their risk of becoming obese as well. A similar connection was found in a study from the June issue of the journal Obesity . But researchers found that connection may also help people lose weight.
NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Weight-loss surgery has been reserved for people who are morbidly obese, with a body mass index of 40 or greater. However, both gastric bypass surgery and adjustable gastric banding surgery is increasingly performed on less-obese people. That may be a good thing, according to a new study. Researchers at Stanford University looked at the outcomes of 981 people who had gastric bypass surgery. The patient's BMIs ranged from below 35 to greater than 50. The lower-BMI patients had better outcomes than the higher-BMI patients.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Moderately obese people who ate the Mediterranean diet lost more weight than groups of people who followed either a low-fat or a low-carbohydrate diet, researchers reported. The Mediterranean group weighed almost seven pounds less than they weighed six years earlier. In the low-carb group, the total was 3.7 pounds, and the low-fat group was 1.3 pounds. The Mediterranean diet is one based on the eating habits of people who live in that part of the world -- high in produce, and including olive oil and fish.
NEWS
October 10, 2010
News from the Obesity Society annual meeting in San Diego: -- Doctors have tried inserting a balloon into the stomach to make a person feel full so he won't eat as much and will lose weight. Now scientists are turning to a similar strategy that involves swallowing a capsule. -- Researchers in Calgary reported Sunday that they had devised fake food, or pseudofood, to make people feel fuller. The method involved filling a gelatin capsule made of biocompatible and biodegradable materials with expandable, absorbent fiber and polymer granules.
NEWS
September 27, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Exercise relieved symptoms of arthritis in obese mice, even though they lost no weight from their efforts, a study finds. Excessive weight has long been considered one of the culprits of osteoarthritis, since it puts additional strain on joints. While exercise has been shown in some studies to ease arthritis symptoms, others have found that for overweight and obese people, a fitness regimen can exacerbate the condition. This study, published online Tuesday in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism , found that although weight may heighten the risk of osteoarthritis, regular exercise could diminish joint problems by slowing its progression.
HEALTH
August 9, 2010 | By Elena Conis, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the so-called fat-controlling hormone leptin was first discovered, scientists predicted it would be the basis for a bonanza of new obesity-fighting drugs. That was 15 years ago. Today, scientists are still trying to develop leptin-based weight-loss therapies, but progress has been slower than anticipated. That's because leptin appears to affect several biochemical pathways in the body, and scientists still can't agree on how, precisely, the hormone works. Researchers do, however, know one thing about leptin: "It's way more complicated than we first thought," says Susan Fried, a professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|