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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Anne Francis, who costarred in the 1950s science-fiction classic "Forbidden Planet" and later played the title role in "Honey West," the mid-1960s TV series about a sexy female private detective with a pet ocelot, died Sunday. She was 80. Francis, who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2007 and underwent surgery and chemotherapy, died of complications of pancreatic cancer at a retirement home in Santa Barbara, said Jane Uemura, her daughter. Friends and family members were with her, said a family spokeswoman, Melissa Fitch.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
Robert L. Brosio, a retired federal prosecutor who supervised high-profile cases that included those against bank swindler Charles Keating Jr. and Los Angeles police officers who were involved in the beating of Rodney King, has died. He was 77. Brosio, who for 28 years led the criminal division of the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles, had a massive pulmonary embolism in February, his daughter Serena Brosio said. He died Friday at a Pasadena hospital. While he seldom argued cases in court himself, Brosio was in charge of more than 100 prosecutors and set a standard of "ramrod integrity," said Nora Manella, an associate justice of the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Vonetta McGee, an actress whose big-screen heyday during the blaxploitation era of the 1970s included leading roles in "Blacula" and "Shaft in Africa," has died. She was 65. McGee died Friday at a hospital in Berkeley after experiencing cardiac arrest and being on life support for two days, said family spokeswoman Kelley Nayo. Although McGee had been diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma at age 17, Nayo said, her death was not related to the disease. McGee was described as "one of the busiest and most beautiful black actresses" by Times movie reviewer Kevin Thomas in 1972, the year she appeared opposite Fred Williamson in the black action movie "Hammer," and had starring roles in the crime-drama "Melinda" and the horror film "Blacula."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014
Kate O'Mara, 74, a British actress best known for her role as Caress Morrell, sister to Joan Collins' Alexis Colby, in the 1980s prime-time soap opera "Dynasty," died Sunday at a nursing home in southern England after a short illness, according to her agent, Phil Belfield. The actress, who began her television career in the 1960s, is remembered by many for her role in "Triangle" - a soap opera set aboard a North Sea ferry that is often cited as the worst piece of British television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By David Colker
As far back as 1968, rising star Christopher Jones - who seemed to have everything at 26, including sensitive good looks, adoring fans and a steady stream of film offers - said he wasn't much devoted to acting. "I think of acting as only a means to an end," Jones, who was often compared to James Dean, said in a Los Angeles Times interview. "Acting's just my work. " Later that year Jones starred in the youth rebellion film "Wild in the Streets" and had a major role as a British officer in David Lean's 1970 epic "Ryan's Daughter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Frank Bank, who as Clarence "Lumpy" Rutherford served as the dim-witted foil to "Beaver" Cleaver and brother Wally on the classic TV comedy "Leave It to Beaver," died Saturday. He was 71. A spokesman for Hillside Memorial Park in Los Angeles confirmed Bank's death but did not disclose where he died or the cause. Bank had a number of illnesses and was hospitalized recently in Rancho Mirage, said Jerry Mathers who played Beaver Cleaver in the popular series that ran from 1957 to 1963.
WORLD
October 20, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Scott Kraft, Los Angeles Times
In the modern pantheon of the world's dictators, Moammar Kadafi stood apart. Far apart. Erratic and mercurial, he fancied himself a political philosopher, practiced an unorthodox and deadly diplomacy, and cut a sometimes cartoonish figure in flowing robes and dark sunglasses, surrounded by heavily armed female bodyguards. He ruled Libya with an iron fist for 42 years, bestowing on himself an array of titles, including "king of culture," "king of kings of Africa" and, simply, "leader of the revolution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Donald P. Shiley, who was the co-inventor of an artificial valve that revolutionized heart surgery and who later used his fortune to support medical research, the arts and education, has died. He was 90. Shiley died July 31 in San Diego after several years of failing health, including the eye disorder macular degeneration. Shiley donated tens of millions of dollars to San Diego's blue-chip institutions: the Old Globe Theatre, UC San Diego, KPBS public radio and television, Scripps Clinic and the University of San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2010 | By Claudia Luther
John Forsythe, the suave actor with the silvery hair and mellifluous voice who was familiar to millions for his roles on the popular television series "Bachelor Father," "Charlie's Angels" and "Dynasty," died Thursday. He was 92. Forsythe, who had heart bypass surgery in 1979 and was hospitalized for colon cancer in 2006, died at his home in the Santa Barbara County town of Santa Ynez from complications of pneumonia, publicist Harlan Boll said. Skilled at both comedy and drama, the actor began his long career on Broadway, where he stepped in for Henry Fonda in "Mister Roberts" and later originated the lead role in the hit comedy "Teahouse of the August Moon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Ilene Woods, who provided the speaking and singing voice for the title character in Walt Disney's classic 1950 animated feature " Cinderella," has died. She was 81. Woods, a Calabasas resident, died of causes related to Alzheimer's disease Thursday at a nursing and rehabilitation center in Canoga Park, said her husband, Ed Shaughnessy, the former longtime drummer on Johnny Carson's "Tonight Show." Woods was a busy 18-year-old singer on radio in 1948 when, as a favor to two songwriter friends, Jerry Livingston and Mack David, she recorded a "demo" of a few songs they had written for Walt Disney's upcoming animated feature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014
Ola Lee Mize Medal of Honor recipient dies at 82 Ola Lee Mize, 82, a Medal of Honor recipient who fended off enemy assaults and rescued wounded soldiers during the Korean War, died Wednesday in Gadsden, Ala., after a long illness. His death was confirmed by the Congressional Medal of Honor Society. Mize was an Army master sergeant in June 1953 when his company was caught in a heavy attack near Surang-ni, South Korea. He endured an intense barrage to rescue a wounded soldier, then routed enemy soldiers who had penetrated the Americans' trenches, inflicting heavy casualties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Caked with sweat and the desert sand that had been lashing his face over hundreds of miles, Drino Miller rolled his hopped-up dune buggy to a stop. He was nine miles from the finish line of the 1970 Mexican 1000 - a grueling test for man and machine that he was achingly close to winning. It was the middle of the night. He was miles ahead of a field that included racing legend Parnelli Jones and actor James Garner. He had roared past dozens of battered racing vehicles stuck on the torturous dirt roads and non-roads of Baja California, their engines blown, suspensions shot and drivers exhausted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2014 | By David Ng
Norman Yonemoto, a Los Angeles artist who along with his younger brother, Bruce, created innovative video installations that often explored mass media, Hollywood and other forms of pop culture, has died. He was 67. Yonemoto died Friday at his home in Venice. He had been in ill health since suffering a number of strokes, the last of which was in October, said Carole Ann Klonarides, a family representative. Collaborating with his brother for nearly four decades, Yonemoto created video artwork that often appropriated the visual vernacular of Hollywood movies, television and advertising to challenge the viewer's assumptions about the media.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Steve Chawkins
After the founder of the International Surfing Museum dipped a toe in the beautiful, blue Pacific, she never bothered to hang the other nine. It was too cold, and the last thing a Canadian farm girl wanted in California was cold. Even so, Natalie Kotsch was intrigued by surfing culture, in love with the town that calls itself Surf City, and unrelenting in her drive to establish a museum devoted to the sport. Kotsch, an effervescent real estate broker who grew up more than 600 miles from the nearest ocean and never swam, much less surfed, in the Pacific, died Feb. 20 at her home in Huntington Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2014 | By Joe Mozingo
Wearing a nitrogen-powered jet pack, Dale Gardner stepped from the space shuttle, alone and untethered, 224 miles above Earth. Armed with a 5-foot probe called a stinger, Gardner drifted toward a wayward satellite, the Westar 6, which was spinning slowly, 35 feet away. When he got close enough Gardner inserted the stinger into the orbiter's spent rocket nozzle and brought it to a halt. "I got it," he exclaimed. The mission to salvage the Westar and another communications satellite, the Palapa B-2, in November 1984 marked a high point of the space shuttle program, feeding a growing sense of NASA's infallibility that would end just a year later, when the Challenger exploded just after launch over Florida.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014
Chokwe Lumumba, 66, a human rights activist and nationally prominent attorney who became mayor of Jackson, Miss., last year, died Tuesday at a Jackson hospital, city officials said. The cause wasn't immediately clear. As an attorney, Lumumba represented Tupac Shakur in cases including one in which the rapper was cleared of aggravated assault in the shootings of two off-duty police officers who were visiting Atlanta from another city when they were wounded. Shakur died in 1996. Lumumba also represented Lance Parker, one of the defendants in the attack on truck driver Reginald O. Denny at the beginning of the 1992 Los Angeles riots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Ralph Mooney, the influential steel guitarist whose crisp, melodically rich and rhythmically buoyant sound bolstered dozens of country music hits by artists including Buck Owens, Merle Haggard, Wynn Stewart and Wanda Jackson before he joined Waylon Jennings' band for a 20-year stint, has died. He was 82. Mooney died Sunday at his home in Kennedale, Texas, of complications from cancer, said his wife, Wanda. Although he had slowed down in recent years, he still played and recorded periodically until near the end of his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
In the end, professional baseball pitcher turned religion talk-show host Frank Pastore probably would have been philosophical about the motorcycle accident that claimed his life. Pastore, 55, died Monday from injuries suffered one month earlier when a car swerved into him on the 210 Freeway in Duarte as he was riding to his Upland home after finishing his daily show on KKLA-FM. His talk show, which aired from 4 to 7 p.m. on the Glendale station, was popular with conservative Christians and sometimes touched on his own baseball background as proof that divine intervention can change people forever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2014
Franny Beecher, 92, a guitarist for Bill Haley and the Comets, who helped kick off the rock 'n' roll era with the hit "Rock Around the Clock" in 1955, died in his sleep Monday night at a nursing home near Philadelphia, his daughter Pauline Grinstead said. The Comets, whose hits also included "See You Later, Alligator," are credited by some music historians with having recorded the first rock 'n' roll song in 1953 with "Crazy Man, Crazy," according to the group's biography on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame website.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2014
Garrick Utley, 74, a veteran TV journalist whose far-ranging career included anchoring duties as well as reporting from more than 70 countries, died of cancer Thursday in New York. NBC announced his death Friday morning. Utley began at NBC News in 1963, and for three decades handled a wide variety of assignments. Early on, he reported from Vietnam on the escalating conflict. In later years, he moderated "Meet the Press. " In between, Utley anchored "Weekend Today" and the Sunday "Nightly News," as well as two newsmagazines in different decades, under four titles.
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