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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2010
Geoffrey Burgon, 69, the British composer whose soundtrack for the television production of "Brideshead Revisited" became a hit recording, died Tuesday after a short illness, according to an announcement from his London publisher, Chester Music. Burgon also contributed to the Monty Python movie "Life of Brian" and produced music for "Dr. Who," "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy," "The Chronicles of Narnia" and other TV productions. Burgon's score for the TV adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's novel "Brideshead Revisited" sold 100,000 copies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2010 | By Alan Abrahamson
Juan Antonio Samaranch, the longtime president of the International Olympic Committee who led the Olympic movement out of turmoil to unprecedented influence and prosperity, only to see his legacy tarnished by the specter of doping in sports and a corruption scandal, has died. He was 89. Samaranch, a Spaniard who served as IOC president from 1980 to 2001, died Wednesday, hospital authorities in Barcelona told the Associated Press. He had been in failing health since he collapsed one day after the last of his four terms ended, in July 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2011
ROBERT C. PIERPOINT CBS News correspondent covered six presidents Robert C. Pierpoint, 86, a CBS News correspondent who covered six presidents, the Korean War, the Kennedy assassination and the Iranian hostage crisis in a career that spanned more than four decades, died Saturday of complications from surgery at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, his family said. The Santa Barbara resident had broken his hip Oct. 12. After making his name covering the Korean War — a role he reprised when he provided his radio voice for the widely watched final episode of "MASH" in 1983 — Pierpoint became a White House correspondent during the Eisenhower administration, a position he would hold through the Carter administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 2012
Pierre Schoendoerffer, 83, an Oscar-winning French filmmaker who was held prisoner in Indochina and chronicled the pain of war on screen and on the page, died Wednesday, the French military health service said. France's Le Figaro newspaper said Schoendoerffer died in a hospital outside Paris after an operation. Born in central France on May 5, 1928, Schoendoerffer served as a cameraman in the French army in the 1950s and volunteered to be parachuted into the besieged fortress of Dien Bien Phu, where the decisive battle of the French war in Indochina was fought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009
Harold Bell Creator of Woodsy Owl Harold Bell, 90, a merchandising executive who designed the environmentally conscious character Woodsy Owl that urged people to "Give a Hoot, Don't Pollute," died Dec. 4 of renal failure and complications in West Los Angeles, his family said. Bell created Woodsy Owl in 1970, in time for the first Earth Day, according to Gerald R. Williams' book "The Forest Service: Fighting for Public Lands." The idea was to create a symbol that would "promote wise use of the environment and programs that foster maintenance and improvement of environmental quality," Williams wrote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2009
A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Dec. 19 for Avery Clayton, who established a library and museum to showcase his mother's major collection of African American artifacts. The service will be at Agape International Spiritual Center, 5700 Buckingham Parkway, Culver City. Clayton died Thanksgiving Day at age 62. Instead of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to the Mayme A. Clayton Library and Museum, 4130 Overland Ave., Culver City, CA 90230.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2010
John Warhola Brother raised artist Andy Warhol John Warhola, 85, the older brother who helped raise Pop Art icon Andy Warhol and later helped establish the Andy Warhol Museum in their native Pittsburgh, died Christmas Eve after battling pneumonia at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, according to his son, Donald Warhola. Warhola was one of three founding members of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and was its vice president for 20 years. The foundation established the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh in 1994, seven years after the artist ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2010
Dov Shilansky He began recitations of Holocaust victims' names Dov Shilansky, 86, a former Israeli Parliament speaker and advocate for memorializing victims of the Holocaust, died Thursday at a Tel Aviv hospital. The cause was not given. Shilansky served as speaker of the Parliament from 1988 to 1992. But possibly his longest-lasting legacy is a ceremony that has become part of Israel's observance of an annual memorial day for the 6 million Jewish victims of the Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2011
Johnny Preston Singer had No. 1 hit with 'Running Bear' Johnny Preston, 71, who had a No. 1 pop single in 1960 with "Running Bear," died Friday at a hospital in Beaumont, Texas, his son Scott told the Associated Press. The elder Preston had bypass surgery last year. "Running Bear," a love song about an "Indian brave" named Running Bear and his "Indian maid," Little White Dove, reached No. 1 on Billboard magazine's charts in 1960. The song was written by disc jockey and singer J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson, who died in the 1959 plane crash in which Ritchie Valens and Buddy Holly also were killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Robert B. Parker, the best-selling author whose long-running "Spenser" private-eye novels updated the genre of hard-boiled detective fiction in the 1970s, has died. He was 77. Parker died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Cambridge, Mass., said his longtime literary agent, Helen Brann. "He was at his desk, working on a new book -- a new Spenser," Brann said. Once dubbed "the doyen of old-school, hard-boiled American pulp," the former English professor at Northeastern University in Boston wrote 60 novels -- 37 of them featuring his tough but literate private eye, Spenser, who debuted in "The Godwulf Manuscript" in 1973.
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