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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2010 | By Alan Abrahamson
Juan Antonio Samaranch, the longtime president of the International Olympic Committee who led the Olympic movement out of turmoil to unprecedented influence and prosperity, only to see his legacy tarnished by the specter of doping in sports and a corruption scandal, has died. He was 89. Samaranch, a Spaniard who served as IOC president from 1980 to 2001, died Wednesday, hospital authorities in Barcelona told the Associated Press. He had been in failing health since he collapsed one day after the last of his four terms ended, in July 2001.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2009
A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Dec. 19 for Avery Clayton, who established a library and museum to showcase his mother's major collection of African American artifacts. The service will be at Agape International Spiritual Center, 5700 Buckingham Parkway, Culver City. Clayton died Thanksgiving Day at age 62. Instead of flowers, the family has asked that donations be made to the Mayme A. Clayton Library and Museum, 4130 Overland Ave., Culver City, CA 90230.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2010
John Warhola Brother raised artist Andy Warhol John Warhola, 85, the older brother who helped raise Pop Art icon Andy Warhol and later helped establish the Andy Warhol Museum in their native Pittsburgh, died Christmas Eve after battling pneumonia at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, according to his son, Donald Warhola. Warhola was one of three founding members of the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and was its vice president for 20 years. The foundation established the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh in 1994, seven years after the artist ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2010
Dov Shilansky He began recitations of Holocaust victims' names Dov Shilansky, 86, a former Israeli Parliament speaker and advocate for memorializing victims of the Holocaust, died Thursday at a Tel Aviv hospital. The cause was not given. Shilansky served as speaker of the Parliament from 1988 to 1992. But possibly his longest-lasting legacy is a ceremony that has become part of Israel's observance of an annual memorial day for the 6 million Jewish victims of the Holocaust.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2011
Johnny Preston Singer had No. 1 hit with 'Running Bear' Johnny Preston, 71, who had a No. 1 pop single in 1960 with "Running Bear," died Friday at a hospital in Beaumont, Texas, his son Scott told the Associated Press. The elder Preston had bypass surgery last year. "Running Bear," a love song about an "Indian brave" named Running Bear and his "Indian maid," Little White Dove, reached No. 1 on Billboard magazine's charts in 1960. The song was written by disc jockey and singer J.P. "The Big Bopper" Richardson, who died in the 1959 plane crash in which Ritchie Valens and Buddy Holly also were killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan
Robert B. Parker, the best-selling author whose long-running "Spenser" private-eye novels updated the genre of hard-boiled detective fiction in the 1970s, has died. He was 77. Parker died Monday of a heart attack at his home in Cambridge, Mass., said his longtime literary agent, Helen Brann. "He was at his desk, working on a new book -- a new Spenser," Brann said. Once dubbed "the doyen of old-school, hard-boiled American pulp," the former English professor at Northeastern University in Boston wrote 60 novels -- 37 of them featuring his tough but literate private eye, Spenser, who debuted in "The Godwulf Manuscript" in 1973.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2010
George 'Bo' Strickland Shortstop in '54 Series George "Bo" Strickland, 84, a shortstop who played 10 years in the major leagues and started for the Cleveland Indians in the 1954 World Series, died Sunday in his hometown of New Orleans, according to the Greenwood Funeral Home. Strickland played for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1950 to '52 and the Indians from '52 to '57, and again from '59 to '60. In 1954, the Indians won 111 games during the regular season but were swept by the New York Giants, led by Willie Mays, in the World Series.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Elwood Jensen, a medical researcher whose ground-breaking work in the field of endocrinology and breast cancer led to revolutionary and life-saving treatments, died of complications from pneumonia on Dec. 16 in suburban Cincinnati, the University of Cincinnati announced. He was 92. He was repeatedly nominated for the Nobel Prize for his discovery of hormone receptors while at the University of Chicago in the 1950s and 1960s. At Chicago, Jensen focused on the impact that breast tissue had on estrogen while most other researchers analyzed how the hormone influenced tissue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2010
Herbert Zeitlin , a longtime educational administrator who was president of West Los Angeles College in the 1970s, died March 2 of colon cancer at his home in Woodland Hills, said his daughter, Joyce Zeitlin Harris. He was 91. -- times staff and wire reports news.obits@latimes.com
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2009
A celebration of the life of award-winning comedy writer Larry Gelbart, who died Sept. 11 at age 81, will be held at 7 p.m. Dec. 10 at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, 8949 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills.
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