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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010 | By Randy Lewis
Teddy Pendergrass, the soul singer who combined hyper-romantic love songs with a virile, sexy stage presence to become the quintessential R&B boudoir crooner before a 1982 car accident left him paralyzed, died Wednesday in his native Philadelphia. He was 59. Pendergrass, best known for the sandpaper voice behind the 1972 hit "If You Don't Know Me By Now" while he was with Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, had undergone colon cancer surgery last year and had been in declining health ever since, his son, Teddy Pendergrass II, said in a statement.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2009 | By Valerie J. Nelson
Hoyt S. Pardee, who with his two brothers transformed a family construction company into a leading Southern California home builder, died of pancreatic cancer Monday at his home in Los Angeles, his family announced. He was 91. The brothers and their company, Pardee Construction, had built more than 30,000 homes by 1985, when they were among the first builders inducted into a statewide hall of fame sponsored by the California Building Industry Assn. Formed in 1946 in Los Angeles, the company became one of the more prolific home builders in the region after World War II, constructing housing tracts around Los Angeles, San Diego and Las Vegas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
Rabbi Bernard King, a pioneer in interfaith work in Orange County, died Monday of liver cancer at his home in Lake Forest, surrounded by his wife and family. He was 72. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article incorrectly said that King had died of lung cancer. King was the founding rabbi at Congregation Shir Ha-Ma'alot in Irvine, which started in Newport Beach as Harbor Reform Temple. He led the congregation for 32 years, increasing the temple from 50 families to about 650 before he retired in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Ron Fletcher, a former dancer and choreographer who helped popularize the Pilates exercise system when he opened the first West Coast studio in 1972, died Tuesday at his home in Stonewall, Texas. He was 90. The cause was congestive heart failure, said Kyria Sabin, director of Fletcher Pilates, which trains instructors in the exercise methods Fletcher developed based on the teachings of Joseph and Clara Pilates. Forty years ago, few people outside of New York, where the Pilates method was first taught, had heard of the unusual fitness regimen, which involved strange-looking machines and movements similar to yoga and calisthenics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Tonino Guerra, an internationally renowned Italian screenwriter who collaborated with Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni and other greats of Italian and world cinema on films such as Fellini's "Amarcord" and Antonioni's "L'Avventura" and "Blow-Up," has died. He was 92. Guerra died Wednesday at his home in Santarcangelo di Romagna, in northern Italy, according to an announcement on the Tonino Guerra Cultural Assn. website. A poet, novelist and former schoolteacher, Guerra began his screenwriting career in Rome in the mid-1950s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2010
Barbara L. Packer, 63, a retired UCLA English professor who specialized in 19th century American literature and was recognized as an authority on Ralph Waldo Emerson, died Dec. 16 at her Los Angeles home, according to the university's English department. She had cancer. Packer, who wrote extensively on Emerson and the Transcendentalists, received wide praise for her 1982 scholarly work "Emerson's Fall: A New Interpretation of the Major Essays. " Richard Poirier, a noted literary scholar, critic and publisher, in reviewing the book for the New York Times, called it "brilliant" and noted that Packer "listens to Emerson and catches his modulations of voice better than anyone ever has. " Packer also was the author of "The Transcendentalists," a 2007 account of the 19th century literary and philosophical movement in New England led by Emerson, Henry David Thoreau and Margaret Fuller, among others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2011 | By Richard Cromelin, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When a record label's female vocal groups include the Supremes and Martha and the Vandellas, it's easy to see why the Marvelettes are often relegated to footnote status. But the Detroit group has a unique distinction in the saga of Motown Records ? the label's first No. 1 pop single, "Please Mr. Postman. " The 1961 record showcased a gritty, pleading vocal by 15-year-old Gladys Horton, who would remain with the group until the late '60s, when she left to care for her disabled son. Horton died Wednesday in Sherman Oaks at age 65, said her other son, Vaughn Thornton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Fayrene "Faye" Treadwell, the former manager of the Drifters who won a longtime legal battle to stop promoters from infringing on the classic rhythm-and-blues vocal group's trademark name, has died. She was 84. Treadwell, one of the first female African American entertainment managers, died of complications of breast cancer May 22 at her home in Burbank, said her daughter, Tina Treadwell. The Arkansas-born Treadwell was the widow of George Treadwell, a veteran music manager whose clients included Sarah Vaughan, Dinah Washington, Billie Holiday and Sammy Davis Jr. He also was the original manager of the Drifters, which was formed in 1953 and recorded the hits "This Magic Moment," "Up on the Roof" and "Under the Boardwalk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
When Jason Weaver of Anaheim was 15, he told his mother he wanted to join the military. She told him to think about it. Two years later, Patricia Weaver came home to find her son meeting with a recruiter. She told the man to leave. "I said, 'I got one more year with my baby,'" she said. "It was my only child. " But her son persisted. After he graduated from El Dorado High School in Placentia in 2007, he decided to get in shape to join the Army. He lost 60 pounds, quit his job at a local grocery store and enlisted in January 2008.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2011
Loren Miller Jr. Longtime Superior Court judge Retired Superior Court Judge Loren Miller Jr., 74, the second of three generations of his family to serve on the bench in California, died Dec. 5 of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Kaiser Permanente West Los Angeles Medical Center, his family said. Miller was appointed to the Los Angeles Municipal Court by Gov. Jerry Brown in 1975 and elevated to the Superior Court in 1977. Until his retirement in 1997, he handled a number of assignments, including supervising judge in Pomona.
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