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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2014
Christopher Chataway British track star helped break 4-minute mile Christopher Chataway, 82, a British track star and world record-holder who helped Roger Bannister break the four-minute mile, died of cancer Sunday in London, his son Mark said. Chataway, who later became a newscaster and then a British cabinet minister, was one of two runners who trained for months with Bannister, a 25-year-old British medical student, as he prepared to make his bid to run the fastest mile then ever recorded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014
Robert A. Pastor, an influential scholar and policymaker who spent decades working for better inter-American relations and democracy and free elections in the Western Hemisphere, died Wednesday at his home in Washington, D.C., after a three-year battle with cancer. He was 66. His death was announced by American University, where Pastor was a professor in the School of International Service. Pastor had been President Carter's national security adviser for Latin America and the Caribbean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2014 | Times wire services
Longtime Northwestern University professor Dale T. Mortensen, who shared the 2010 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with two other Americans for their work explaining how unemployment can remain high despite a large number of job openings, has died. He was 74. Mortensen died Thursday at his home in Wilmette, Ill., said his personal assistant and close family friend, Sue Triforo. Northwestern President Morton Schapiro paid tribute to Mortensen, saying "his groundbreaking work is especially relevant to policymakers attempting to address unemployment today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian
When Thomas V. Jones took control of Northrop Corp. in 1960, it was a secondary aerospace company whose future was uncertain, but the legendary gambles Jones made over the next 30 years swept the company to the top ranks of the defense industry during the Cold War. Jones came from an era when the chiefs of U.S. aerospace companies laid huge bets on future projects, and over an extraordinary three-decade tenure as Northrop's chief executive he...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Donald Forst, a veteran newsman who led New York Newsday and the Village Voice as they won Pulitzer Prizes and also helped resuscitate the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, died Saturday in Albany, N.Y. He was 81. He had colon cancer, said his companion, Val Haynes. Forst's journalism career started in the mid-1950s and included stints as cultural editor of the New York Times, assistant city editor of the New York Post and editor in chief of the Boston Herald. He also worked at more than a dozen other publications, including the Houston Press, Boston magazine and the New York Herald Tribune.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2014
Larry D. Mann Canadian character actor, TV announcer Larry D. Mann, 91, a veteran actor who voiced Yukon Cornelius in the animated Christmas favorite "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," died of age-related causes Monday in Los Angeles, said his son, Richard Mann. Mann, a Canadian-born actor and TV announcer, played the role of the hearty prospector in the Christmas TV special first broadcast in 1964. Since the 1950s, Mann did voice work for other animated shows, had small roles in movies, including "The Sting" and "In the Heat of the Night," and appeared in dozens of TV series including "Gunsmoke," "Bewitched" and "Hill Street Blues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Susan Rasky, an award-winning congressional correspondent who mentored a generation of young political journalists as a senior lecturer at UC Berkeley, died Sunday at her home in El Cerrito, Calif. She was 61 and had breast cancer. A graduate of Los Angeles' Fairfax High School and an alumna of Berkeley, Rasky was a familiar sight at California political events, wrestling an armload of papers and trailing a gaggle of students, whom she nudged to join in news conferences and panel discussions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2013 | Times wire services
Dallas billionaire and heavyweight GOP political donor Harold Simmons, who gave tens of millions of dollars to Republican candidates, including Texas Gov. Rick Perry and former presidential nominee Mitt Romney, has died. He was 82. Simmons, born to two school teachers in East Texas, became one of the richest men in the country with interests ranging from energy to chemicals. His spokesman Chuck McDonald said Simmons died Saturday in Dallas but did not disclose the cause. Simmons made his fortune as a Texas corporate raider nicknamed the "Ice Man" after structuring leveraged takeover bids using junk bonds in the 1970s and '80s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2013 | By Times staff and wire services
Andrew Jacobs Jr., a former longtime Indiana congressman known for turning down pay raises and PAC donations as well as for being an early opponent of the Vietnam War, died Saturday at his Indianapolis home. He was 81. He had been in declining health for some time, said Gary Taylor, a family friend and former campaign manager. A Democrat, Jacobs served in the U.S. House of Represenatives from 1965 until a reelection defeat in 1973. He succeeded in another House election and served again from 1975 until his retirement in 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2013 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The difference between a glove for the left hand and one for the right is obvious to the human eye, even though the two are mirror images of each other. It is an easy task to distinguish between them and separate them from each other. Most biological molecules have similar mirror images, but it can be difficult to distinguish between them and even harder to separate them. Hardest of all is synthesizing only the desired form, because only this form will interact with other biological molecules in the correct fashion.
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