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Obligations

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NEWS
March 10, 1988
There are a great many obligations that elected officials must meet in serving the people. Perhaps the most important, and the most elementary, is to listen and learn exactly what people want from their government, and then make every effort to provide it. No man or woman should ever be allowed to hold such a position of trust for the purpose of self-gain. To find satisfaction in a job well done and to receive the recognition that accompanies having served well is all that should be expected by a public servant.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our board is very lax when it comes to financials. We don't get timely information, and the information we do get from management and our treasurer is so sparse that owners and the board alike don't have any idea where our association stands. Is there some kind of format that financial statements must follow? Answer: Civil Code section 5305 pertains to standards used for preparation of review of the association's financial statement. It states that unless the governing documents impose more stringent standards, a review of the association's financial statement shall be prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles by a licensee of the California Board of Accountancy for any fiscal year in which the gross income to the association exceeds $75,000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1993 | Compiled For The Times by Jim Blair
JOHN BROESAMLE, Professor of American political history, Cal State Northridge The framers of the Constitution had a strong sense of civic (duty); (but) especially over the past 50 years, a sense of entitlement has displaced obligation. In fact, the Bill of Rights is an overwhelmingly negative document--a set of "shall nots" and the main institution that "shall not" is government. That reflects our national view of democracy. Over time, Americans have tended to think of freedom as freedom from responsibility.
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By Lorie Graham
"Does it stay on all the time or does it come off?" Ahmed asked from his hospital bed, frowning at the thought of a prosthetic leg. "I want one that doesn't come off. " These are the words of a 12-year-old boy, an innocent victim of a brutal regime and an international system that has in too many ways failed the people of Syria. My own 13-year-old, reading these words in the newspaper, asks whether there is something that can be done to help. I begin my usual "It's complicated" - there are legal constraints, there is the lack of political will - but seeing the look in my son's eyes, I say instead, "Yes there is. " The U.N. Security Council, and its permanent members in particular, could take bolder action, working in good faith toward delivering on the promise of the U.N. Charter: "To save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, and to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, [and]
BUSINESS
March 19, 1986
Victoria Station of Larkspur, Calif., said its negotiations with lessors, lenders and other parties to restructure certain obligations are taking longer than hoped and probably won't be wrapped up in the near term. Victoria Station, which has posted losses during the last three years, said that revenue has continued to decline. The restaurant company said it might have to consider "other alternatives" if progress isn't made on the restructuring and if revenue doesn't improve.
OPINION
March 26, 2004
Re "State Seeks to Reopen Done Deals," March 22: It is the height of irresponsibility for the state Legislature's chief attorney to cast doubts upon the enforceability of multiyear pacts with labor unions. If California lacks the authority to enter into multiyear obligations to pay its workers, then it also lacks the authority to enter into multiyear obligations to repay bonds -- and presto, we're back in the most desperate fiscal crisis in this state's history. Michael W. Boggs Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1985
Re the article (Nov. 25), "Lottery Can 'Pay Off' With a Bad Feeling, Too": The article said, "Several $1,000 and $5,000 winners have lost every dime" to the controller's office. It seems to me the winners lose nothing. Instead, they won the ability to repay student loans, past state income taxes, child support and other unpaid obligations--obligations each has consciously made. They won their money in the form of debt relief and their creditors received past due payments in the bargain.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2005
Regarding "United Airlines Cleared to Shed Pension Plans" (May 11): After tightening bankruptcy laws for ordinary citizens, our government apparently is going to aid a major company's mugging of its personnel. By defaulting on its pension system, United Airlines suddenly has a huge advantage over airlines that are trying to meet their obligations to their workers. Meanwhile the U.S. government will pick up the tab -- in the billions -- to pay pennies on the dollar to United's employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2000
Once again the annual jury summons has appeared in my mailbox. Each time, larger, longer, more complicated and with less flexibility. Financial hardship is no longer a viable reason to be excused. If financial hardship is to be given consideration, you must supply annual income and monthly expenses. I'm not applying for a credit card here! It appears I'm begging to maintain my existence and fulfill my financial obligations. I'm not looking for an excuse not to serve, I am asking our government to find a solution to this "fleecing" of American citizens.
OPINION
May 19, 2005
Re "Faithful Are Carving Niche in the Workplace," May 15: Corporate America is making a huge mistake by making concessions to evangelicals who, like all of their fundamentalist soul mates (including the Taliban in Afghanistan and the Saudi Wahhabi Muslims who perpetrated 9/11) will stop at nothing to spread their intolerant vision of how society should function. Anyone who thinks these fanatics will be content with the current workplace accommodations is mistaken. They don't want to be part of the mainstream; they want to take over.
OPINION
January 2, 2014 | By Robert Zaretsky
For food, fashion and fast trains, few labels are more sought after, and rightly so, than "Made in France. " But when it comes to the making and unmaking of empires, not so much. Take the case of the Central African Republic. Three weeks ago, as bloody mayhem engulfed the CAR, Fran├žois Hollande did what French presidents do best: He sent in the paratroops. With the blessing, and precious little else, of his European neighbors, Hollande declared his intention to protect 100 or so French nationals in Bangui, the capital, and to disarm both the outlawed Seleka fighters, overwhelmingly Muslim, and the vigilante anti-balaka (or "machete")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Even in deep blue California, where Democrats dominate, organized labor is losing public popularity. That's a general statement, based on nonpartisan polling. Specifically, public employee unions are tarnishing all labor, according to the pollster. He pinpoints pension envy: public employees pulling down generous retirement benefits that private sector taxpayers began losing years ago. That's the long-term public gripe. And recently in the traditional labor stronghold of the San Francisco Bay Area, voters have especially soured on unions because of two very annoying public transit strikes.
OPINION
December 4, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A judge's ruling Tuesday that the city of Detroit's bankruptcy case may go forward - and that its pension obligations are not entitled to special protection but can be reduced, along with other debts - sends a chilly message to workers in California, where Stockton and San Bernardino are moving through the Chapter 9 bankruptcy process and other cities are struggling with their costs and revenues. The decision makes it clear, if it wasn't previously, that the promise of full retirement pay for municipal employees is directly dependent on the continuing solvency and sound financial planning and management of cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
Dwarfed by the looming seal of a troubled city, a group of nearly a dozen candidates crowded on the City Council dais, shoulder to shoulder, taking turns explaining why they should be the next mayor of San Bernardino. There was the retired coach who said he could whip the city into shape like the boys on his wrestling team. The developer who wanted to make it easier to build. The real estate broker running on a platform of prayer, transparency in government and turning a languishing shopping mall into the world's largest skate park.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON - A plan to regulate the British press as a result of the country's phone-hacking scandal was signed by Queen Elizabeth II on Wednesday despite the objections of publishers who sought a court order to block such a measure. The royal charter approved by the queen and the nation's major political parties calls for the creation of a watchdog group designed to curb the type of abuses revealed by the scandal. The practices include listening to the voicemails of crime victims, celebrities, royal family members and others, such as employees or relatives of people in the news.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger
The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected an appeal by Argentina in a long-running sovereign debt dispute, but the closely watched case is far from over. The high court's decision, handed down Monday, upholds a 2012 ruling by a lower court obliging the South American republic to pay all its bondholders at once - including those that have refused offers to renegotiate the value of their holdings and instead brought suit seeking repayment. Creditors who sued the nation, including two large hedge funds, hailed the decision as a victory.
OPINION
December 4, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
A judge's ruling Tuesday that the city of Detroit's bankruptcy case may go forward - and that its pension obligations are not entitled to special protection but can be reduced, along with other debts - sends a chilly message to workers in California, where Stockton and San Bernardino are moving through the Chapter 9 bankruptcy process and other cities are struggling with their costs and revenues. The decision makes it clear, if it wasn't previously, that the promise of full retirement pay for municipal employees is directly dependent on the continuing solvency and sound financial planning and management of cities.
OPINION
September 10, 2004
Re "Documents Say Bush Got Breaks in Military," Sept. 9, on President Bush's National Guard service: It isn't so much trying to avoid going to Vietnam, or even using his father's connections to avoid what my own friends couldn't avoid. It isn't even losing interest in his obligation as a young man to serve his country in a time of war, or disobeying a direct order, which would have landed any other man in the brig and in the jungles of Vietnam. It is the moral cowardice he displays by not owning up to it for these many years.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
As every legislative craftsman knows, the trick in giving your bill a name is, first, come up with a title that yields a catchy acronym. Second, make sure the title doesn't explain what the bill does. Hence, the Inform Act. The name certainly is alluring. It sounds like a measure to make government more transparent to its citizens, which is exactly what its promoters say it is. But it may be more accurate to think of it as the Misinform or even Disinform Act. You may be hearing a lot about the Inform Act in a few weeks.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Bank of America Corp. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. say they have satisfied their obligations to help troubled borrowers under last year's landmark mortgage settlement with state and federal officials. Another bank that signed the settlement, Wells Fargo & Co. said it is "90% of the way" to meeting its obligations, while Citigroup Inc. said it "remains committed to fulfilling the terms" while declining to characterize its progress. The self-reported information will not be credited officially until Joseph J. Smith Jr., the national monitor for the settlement, reviews the data.
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