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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1995 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The only medical program in the Antelope Valley that allows poor women to have their babies in a hospital setting, whether they have health insurance or not, will be a casualty of budget cuts, Los Angeles County health officials said Monday. The 6-year-old joint obstetrics program between county-owned High Desert Hospital , and private Antelope Valley Hospital will end Oct. 1 and is one in a series of cuts in the county's health care system to bridge the department's $655-million deficit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
June 10, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - For much of her life, Aqilah Hikmat had beaten the odds. In a country where women struggle to get educations and find good jobs, she was an accomplished physician, the head of the obstetrics ward at a major provincial hospital, beloved by her patients. And it was a source of enormous pride to the 49-year-old doctor that two of her four children, including a daughter, were medical students, poised to follow in her career footsteps. The day she was shot to death by a U.S. soldier along the road to Kabul, she and her husband were on their way from their restive home province of Ghazni - a dangerous trip, but one they made weekly.
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OPINION
August 19, 2005
Re "Supervisors Move to Close Some King/Drew Wards," Aug. 17 Hospitals in Third World countries do not have transplant teams or cardiac surgery, but they certainly have obstetrics and pediatrics. While the country is besieged with teen pregnancy, childhood obesity and other preventable pediatric ailments, the three white males sitting on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors prepare to cut essential services at King/Drew for underserved African Americans and Latinos without in-depth analysis of their actions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dr. William J. Dignam, 86, a founding member of UCLA's department of obstetrics and gynecology and a former senior associate dean for academic affairs at what is now the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, died Dec. 5 at UCLA Medical Center. The cause of death was not announced. "Dr. Dignam was an outstanding and gifted teacher and clinician who was a role model to many," said Dr. Gautam Chaudhuri, executive chairman of the obstetrics department. Born in Manchester, N.H.
NEWS
February 20, 1990 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For thousands of expectant mothers in Los Angeles, technicolor visions of their sons' and daughters' glorious entrance into the world can be quickly shattered upon their arrival in Ward 5L, the labor and delivery section at Women's Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1990 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cradling her baby in her arms, 31-year-old Celia Barrera waited in the parking lot to see the pediatrician. On a gray December day, she and a dozen other low-income parents were bringing their children to a St. Jude Hospital and Rehabilitation Center pediatric health-mobile that comes here once a week. Motioning to her swelling girth, Barrera said she too could use a checkup. More than three months' pregnant, she had not yet seen a doctor. "Si, problemas, " Barrera sighed.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a novel program, Los Angeles County health officials have joined forces with the private sector in a plan to divert thousands of pregnant women to private hospitals to ease the tremendous overcrowding of the county's obstetrical system. In exchange, the county has offered to cut Medi-Cal red tape for private hospitals and doctors by paying them directly for their services, then claiming reimbursement from the state under Medi-Cal guidelines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1989 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that obstetric services at Los Angeles County hospitals are "critically overloaded," county health department chief Robert C. Gates told a state medical commission Tuesday that women in labor might be turned away from county hospitals unless an immediate solution to the overcrowding problem is found.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal and state governments must take "immediate steps" to curb the flight of physicians and other health professionals from the practice of obstetrics and to ensure access to care for all women who need it, especially the poor, an Institute of Medicine panel recommended Wednesday. The specter of malpractice litigation represents "a serious threat to the delivery of obstetrical care in this nation," according to the committee, which conducted a two-year study for the institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County health officials Friday abandoned their proposal to close the obstetric, pediatric and neonatal wards at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center after belatedly discovering that the move would have cost them $29 million in government aid. The county Department of Health Services made the announcement just three days after releasing plans for an Oct. 18 public hearing on the controversial recommendations -- the final step in a two-month process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2006 | Rong-Gong Lin II, Times Staff Writer
The obstetrics ward at Centinela Freeman Regional Medical Center Memorial Campus in Inglewood will close Monday as its owners consolidate obstetrical services at a sister hospital a mile away. The closure will cut costs for the locally owned hospital system, which was bought by an investment firm, physicians and community members from Tenet Healthcare Corp. in 2004, said Cyndee Woelfle, director of business development for the hospital system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County health officials Friday abandoned their proposal to close the obstetric, pediatric and neonatal wards at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center after belatedly discovering that the move would have cost them $29 million in government aid. The county Department of Health Services made the announcement just three days after releasing plans for an Oct. 18 public hearing on the controversial recommendations -- the final step in a two-month process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2005 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Several elected officials on Friday condemned a proposal by a Los Angeles County agency to close obstetrics and children's wards at troubled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, vowing at a community meeting that the public hospital would not be downsized without a fight. "This edifice, this center, must go forward.... It's like death by a thousand cuts," U.S. Rep. Diane Watson (D-Los Angeles) told the gathering of more than 100 people.
OPINION
August 19, 2005
Re "Supervisors Move to Close Some King/Drew Wards," Aug. 17 Hospitals in Third World countries do not have transplant teams or cardiac surgery, but they certainly have obstetrics and pediatrics. While the country is besieged with teen pregnancy, childhood obesity and other preventable pediatric ailments, the three white males sitting on the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors prepare to cut essential services at King/Drew for underserved African Americans and Latinos without in-depth analysis of their actions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2005 | Charles Ornstein and Tracy Weber, Times Staff Writers
A bitterly divided Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors took the first step Tuesday toward closing pediatric, obstetric and neonatology wards at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, saying it might be the last chance to save the troubled public hospital. By a 3-2 vote, the board decided to hold a state-mandated public hearing Oct. 18 to formally consider the cuts recommended by the county health department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2005 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
With a key vote scheduled for today, opposition is building to a proposal by Los Angeles County health officials to close pediatric and obstetric wards at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center in an attempt to stabilize the troubled public hospital. A hospital advisory board formed by the county Board of Supervisors is lobbying against the cuts. Two of the five supervisors want to delay the vote on the plan by six weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1998 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An angry Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina scorched county health officials Tuesday for the number of malpractice cases arising from obstetrical care at county hospitals, saying that the problems have continued long after the Health Services Department pledged to correct them.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan to relieve overcrowding in the county obstetrical system has received a significant financial boost from state health officials as well as encouraging response from private hospitals and doctors willing to take greater responsibility for the poor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2005 | Tracy Weber and Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County health officials Thursday recommended dramatically scaling back the services offered by Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center, including closure of patient care wards devoted to pediatrics, obstetrics and neonatology, in their latest attempt to rescue the ailing public hospital. In briefings with the county Board of Supervisors, health director Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2003 | Amanda Covarrubias, Times Staff Writer
Financially struggling Santa Paula Memorial Hospital will stop offering maternity care next month because a nursing shortage is making it difficult to keep the obstetrics unit open, a hospital trustee said Friday. The decision reached this week by the hospital's board of directors is the latest setback to hit the 42-year-old hospital, which is operating with a $3.5-million debt.
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