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Obstruction Of Justice

BUSINESS
April 25, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Sanjay Kumar, the former chief executive of Computer Associates International Inc., and another former executive pleaded guilty Monday to obstruction of justice and securities fraud charges in a massive accounting scandal at the business software company. Kumar and Stephen Richards, former head of worldwide sales, had been accused in a 2004 indictment of engaging in a widespread scheme to falsely inflate the company's quarterly earnings by backdating contracts.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 2006 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court threw out the criminal conviction of Silicon Valley financier Frank Quattrone on Monday, ruling that the judge gave faulty jury instructions at Quattrone's 2004 obstruction-of-justice trial. The three-judge panel sent the case back to district court for retrial but, in a rare step, removed U.S. District Judge Richard Owen from the case. Quattrone's lawyers had complained that the judge favored the prosecution. "Justice has finally been done, and hopefully the U.S.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2005 | David G. Savage and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
Sometimes, a witness says he just can't remember. It may well be a convenient memory lapse, but it is hard to prove such forgetfulness is a crime. I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, however, is accused of something far more elaborate. Special Prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald alleges that Libby made up a false story to deceive investigators and then told the lie under oath to the grand jury.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2005 | E. Scott Reckard
A former Southern California business consultant received a four-month prison sentence for conspiring to obstruct a Securities and Exchange Commission investigation of financial advisor Reed E. Slatkin's $593-million investment scam, federal prosecutors said Tuesday. Daniel W. Jacobs helped stall the SEC for more than a year by pretending to represent a Swiss brokerage holding hundreds of millions of dollars in funds from Slatkin investors, according to his plea agreement with the government.
NATIONAL
October 6, 2005 | Faye Fiore, Times Staff Writer
A former top federal procurement official in the Bush administration was indicted Wednesday on five counts of lying and obstructing justice in connection with an investigation into a lavish golf junket to Scotland arranged by Republican lobbyist Jack Abramoff. David H.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
A former vice president of LendingTree Inc., an Internet-based loan matchmaker, pleaded guilty to obstruction of justice for lying to the Securities and Exchange Commission, according to the U.S. attorney's office in North Carolina. Brian Paquette faces as many as five years in prison and a $250,000 fine, according to the plea agreement with the federal prosecutor.
NATIONAL
September 20, 2005 | Walter F. Roche Jr. and Chuck Neubauer, Times Staff Writers
A top federal procurement appointee of President Bush was arrested Monday on charges that he made false statements and obstructed a federal probe when he was questioned about a Scotland golfing junket arranged by lobbyist Jack Abramoff. In a three-count criminal complaint made public Monday, David H. Safavian was accused of lying to an ethics officer in the General Services Administration regarding his dealings with the lobbyist, who flew him to Scotland in August 2002.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Thursday trimmed a year from former Rite Aid Corp. Chief Executive Martin L. Grass' eight-year sentence for conspiring to obstruct justice and to defraud the nation's third-largest drugstore chain and its shareholders. U.S. District Judge Sylvia H. Rambo said she acted to reduce a disparity between Grass and other defendants sentenced for similar crimes. Grass, 51, smiled and blew a kiss to family members as federal marshals led him from the courtroom.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2005 | Walter Hamilton, Times Staff Writer
Former Silicon Valley investment banker Frank Quattrone's conviction on obstruction of justice should be overturned because of insufficient evidence, improper jury instructions and a trial that was "rife with error," his lawyer told a federal appeals court Tuesday. Quattrone's case is being watched closely by other white-collar defendants and their lawyers. Legal experts believe that the ex-banker's odds of winning his appeal was improved by the U.S.
NATIONAL
June 1, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court overturned the criminal conviction of the Arthur Andersen accounting firm Tuesday, ruling unanimously that its shredding of two tons of Enron-related documents did not prove its intent to obstruct justice. The ruling comes too late to save Andersen, which employed 28,000 people until it was driven out of business because of the 2002 conviction.
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