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Obvious Solution

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000
Re "Let's Not Get Taken for a Ride," editorial, May 1: It's all very well to demand that taxi service from LAX to downtown, or anywhere, be cleaned up. But what about the obvious solution for getting out of LAX to where you need to go, a shuttle-bus system? San Francisco, New York and most other cities have efficient and reasonable buses that eliminate chaos and great expense. Why not L.A.? ROBIN FRIEDHEIM Playa del Rey
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BUSINESS
April 8, 2011 | David Lazarus
There are loony medical bills, and then there's the bill Robert Hsu was hit with after undergoing heart surgery at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in January. Hsu, 84, of Thousand Oaks had an aortic valve replaced on his ticker. He spent four nights in the hospital. The bill: $266,567.46. But is that how much his insurer, Medicare, was billed? No. As I recently reported, hospitals routinely inflate their charges — often by huge margins — so they can still make money after contractual discounts are imposed by insurers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1991
The obvious solution to the Burbank airport noise problem is to have all the pilots and the Friends of the Airport group and the mayor of Burbank and other airport commissioners and aficionados exchange residences with those who live under flight patterns and who complain about the noise. If the pro-airport people believe that neighborhood noise concerns should not dictate the departure routes, then let them bear the noise. JANICE K. MASLOW, North Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000
"State Barreling Ahead Toward a Fuel Shortage," news analysis (Oct. 15) will undoubtedly cause some to complain about government interference, since (according to the article) stricter environmental regulations will limit refinery output and therefore increase gasoline prices. I'd like to remind people--particularly those who haven't been here at least 30 years--of the greatly improved air quality that is the direct result of EPA, AQMD and ARB regulations. Although sometimes onerous and expensive, without these agencies' restrictions on stationary pollution sources, vehicles, barbecues and even lawn mowers, we'd still have the eye-searing, throat-choking smog that I grew up with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000
Make Jerusalem an international city. It seems the obvious solution to that fervently, stubbornly contested city. It has become more of a symbol than a place and should not be the capital or a part of any one nation but an interfaith center where worshipers of all faiths may come in peace and safety. Thus, while no contending nation or faith will win it, neither will any of them lose it. MARSHA HUNT Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1998
Re "Ventura Steps Up Citations on Homeless," Oct. 10, reporting the success of the city of Ventura's crackdown on the homeless population. Why didn't someone think of this before? The obvious solution to the various problems arising from being homeless is to make it against the law! Simple. Police issued 94 citations for illegal camping. So where are those people living today? Raids on Ventura River encampments is not the solution. Displacing the displaced does nothing to solve the problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995
Your Dec. 29 editorial, "Coping With the Great Flood," about the overburdened federal courts, gives three solutions, including the suggestion of increasing the number of judges from 846 to 4,000. You overlook the most obvious solution: Cut the caseload. Cut the caseload by the decriminalization of drugs, cut drug cases, i.e., sales and possession and drug-related cases, like burglaries, robberies, etc. We have spent $150 billion in a futile attempt to stop drugs and have more of them than ever.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000
"State Barreling Ahead Toward a Fuel Shortage," news analysis (Oct. 15) will undoubtedly cause some to complain about government interference, since (according to the article) stricter environmental regulations will limit refinery output and therefore increase gasoline prices. I'd like to remind people--particularly those who haven't been here at least 30 years--of the greatly improved air quality that is the direct result of EPA, AQMD and ARB regulations. Although sometimes onerous and expensive, without these agencies' restrictions on stationary pollution sources, vehicles, barbecues and even lawn mowers, we'd still have the eye-searing, throat-choking smog that I grew up with.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Street Smart: I have noticed a problem at the intersection of Los Angeles Avenue (California 118) and Santa Clara Avenue, just northwest of Camarillo. It was great when they put a traffic light at this intersection. However, to have a better flow of traffic, it should have been a three-way light. The problem occurs when cars are moving southwest from Los Angeles Avenue toward the Ventura Freeway, and a driver going northeast on Santa Clara Avenue wants to turn left toward Saticoy.
SPORTS
November 4, 1994 | LONNIE WHITE
It's no secret that in order for the Raiders to end their six-game losing streak at Kansas City on Sunday, they will have to stop Chief quarterback Joe Montana. Getting it done, however, will be a different story. "You have to keep constant pressure in order to throw him off rhythm," linebacker Winston Moss said. "(The Chiefs) try to give you all kind of looks and run the ball to keep you honest, but the main thing they try to do is pass the ball."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2000
Make Jerusalem an international city. It seems the obvious solution to that fervently, stubbornly contested city. It has become more of a symbol than a place and should not be the capital or a part of any one nation but an interfaith center where worshipers of all faiths may come in peace and safety. Thus, while no contending nation or faith will win it, neither will any of them lose it. MARSHA HUNT Sherman Oaks
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2000
Re "Let's Not Get Taken for a Ride," editorial, May 1: It's all very well to demand that taxi service from LAX to downtown, or anywhere, be cleaned up. But what about the obvious solution for getting out of LAX to where you need to go, a shuttle-bus system? San Francisco, New York and most other cities have efficient and reasonable buses that eliminate chaos and great expense. Why not L.A.? ROBIN FRIEDHEIM Playa del Rey
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1998
Re "Ventura Steps Up Citations on Homeless," Oct. 10, reporting the success of the city of Ventura's crackdown on the homeless population. Why didn't someone think of this before? The obvious solution to the various problems arising from being homeless is to make it against the law! Simple. Police issued 94 citations for illegal camping. So where are those people living today? Raids on Ventura River encampments is not the solution. Displacing the displaced does nothing to solve the problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1996
The plot thickens in the continuing saga of a controversial 1 1/2-mile section of Newport Coast Drive that is slated to relieve commuters of spare change as part of the San Joaquin Hills toll road. This month the Irvine City Council was caught in a squeeze play when the county threatened to withhold Measure M funds if the city did not approve county construction plans for an alternative free bypass road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1995
Your Dec. 29 editorial, "Coping With the Great Flood," about the overburdened federal courts, gives three solutions, including the suggestion of increasing the number of judges from 846 to 4,000. You overlook the most obvious solution: Cut the caseload. Cut the caseload by the decriminalization of drugs, cut drug cases, i.e., sales and possession and drug-related cases, like burglaries, robberies, etc. We have spent $150 billion in a futile attempt to stop drugs and have more of them than ever.
SPORTS
November 4, 1994 | LONNIE WHITE
It's no secret that in order for the Raiders to end their six-game losing streak at Kansas City on Sunday, they will have to stop Chief quarterback Joe Montana. Getting it done, however, will be a different story. "You have to keep constant pressure in order to throw him off rhythm," linebacker Winston Moss said. "(The Chiefs) try to give you all kind of looks and run the ball to keep you honest, but the main thing they try to do is pass the ball."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1996
The plot thickens in the continuing saga of a controversial 1 1/2-mile section of Newport Coast Drive that is slated to relieve commuters of spare change as part of the San Joaquin Hills toll road. This month the Irvine City Council was caught in a squeeze play when the county threatened to withhold Measure M funds if the city did not approve county construction plans for an alternative free bypass road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993 | SUZANNE GORDON, Suzanne Gordon, a journalist and the author of "Prisoners of Men's Dreams" (Little, Brown, 1991), is writing a book on cure versus care. and
We call it "health care," but in reality our U.S. medical system is about "disease repair," the more high-tech the better. And therein lies a flaw that, unless corrected, spells failure for attempts at reform. The flaw is, more specifically, embedded in the dramatic power imbalance between cure-oriented medicine and care-oriented nursing, and the appalling lack of systematic communication between America's 585,000 physicians and 2.1 million nurses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1993 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Street Smart: I have noticed a problem at the intersection of Los Angeles Avenue (California 118) and Santa Clara Avenue, just northwest of Camarillo. It was great when they put a traffic light at this intersection. However, to have a better flow of traffic, it should have been a three-way light. The problem occurs when cars are moving southwest from Los Angeles Avenue toward the Ventura Freeway, and a driver going northeast on Santa Clara Avenue wants to turn left toward Saticoy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993 | SUZANNE GORDON, Suzanne Gordon, a journalist and the author of "Prisoners of Men's Dreams" (Little, Brown, 1991), is writing a book on cure versus care. and
We call it "health care," but in reality our U.S. medical system is about "disease repair," the more high-tech the better. And therein lies a flaw that, unless corrected, spells failure for attempts at reform. The flaw is, more specifically, embedded in the dramatic power imbalance between cure-oriented medicine and care-oriented nursing, and the appalling lack of systematic communication between America's 585,000 physicians and 2.1 million nurses.
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