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NEWS
October 19, 1988 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
The moon, just out, hung over the Ozarks like a pale opal. Soon families would be saying grace over Sunday dinner; children would be clamoring to turn on the Christmas lights. It was time to go home. But in the darkening woods, four teen-agers lingered, enjoying the rush they always felt when they killed something. A kitten lay crumpled nearby. Sharing some unspoken secret, the boys exchanged furtive glances in the fading light. They were growing edgy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2008 | Steffie Nelson, Special to The Times
Last Sunday evening at the Silent Movie Theater, a clip from the 1938 astrological murder mystery "When Were You Born?" was shown as part of an "Occult L.A." program curated by the author Erik Davis. In the clip, legendary occult scholar Manly P. Hall, who had also written the movie's script, appeared on screen to introduce the concept of astrology.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN, Terry Pristin is a Times staff writer. and
Wearing feathers in her hair, spike heels and a strapless evening gown, Marianne Williamson, New Age guru of the hour, is seated on a hotel ballroom stage in Marina del Rey, shoulder to shoulder with unmarried soap opera actors and other eligible and glamorous singles. Amid much banter and giggling, they will be "auctioned off" by talk-show host Cyndy Garvey and producer-director Garry Marshall.
WORLD
September 5, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Skulking in the dead of night in the remote and overgrown Las Pavas section of the Southern Municipal Cemetery, robbers armed with crowbars and sledgehammers first shattered the tomb's concrete vault and the granite marker that read, "To our dear wife and mother in heaven, Maria de la Cruz Aguero." Then they lifted the coffin lid and stole leg bones and the skull of the woman, who had died Sept. 9, 1993.
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
The "action"--as student body president Jim Hardy now calls the bludgeoning death of Steven Newberry--began to unfold with a casual conversation among seven classmates one September afternoon. Jim and his best friends, Pete Roland and Ron Clements, were there, and the talk, as usual, was about killing. But this time, it wasn't just the twisted fantasies of tough teen-agers fixated on drugs, acid rock and violence. This time, it would be self-fulfilling prophesy.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992 | BARRY SIEGEL, Barry Siegel is a Times national correspondent. "Shades of Gray," a collection of his articles, was published by Bantam Books in March. and
AT FIRST, THOSE FEW WHO PASSED BY were not even certain what they were seeing. A trapper, checking his lines in the remote sand dunes just south of the Minidoka County Landfill, not far from the rural southeast Idaho hamlet of Rupert, thought he glimpsed a burned monkey when he peered inside the round metal cylinder. Days later, a group of teen-agers out four-wheeling dismissed it as junk--a washing machine tub--blown over from the landfill.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2008 | Steffie Nelson, Special to The Times
Last Sunday evening at the Silent Movie Theater, a clip from the 1938 astrological murder mystery "When Were You Born?" was shown as part of an "Occult L.A." program curated by the author Erik Davis. In the clip, legendary occult scholar Manly P. Hall, who had also written the movie's script, appeared on screen to introduce the concept of astrology.
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | DEIRDRE WILSON, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Dudleytown, Conn., is a cursed village in the northwest corner of Connecticut. It has been deserted since horror and misfortune struck its early settlers in the 1700s. People went mad, were struck by lightning or fell ill. The Penobscot Indian reservation in Maine is haunted by an evil white man who married and intimidated a small Indian woman a century ago as he tried to govern the area. In Warren, Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An 11-year-old girl told a Superior Court jury Thursday that she was sexually abused by her grandmother and made to drink human blood during satanic rituals in a secret cave. Dressed in a pink flowered jumpsuit, the blond, cherubic girl testified that at the age of 2 she was taken in a limousine with both her grandparents while her grandfather, now deceased, picked up prostitutes. When she was about 4 years old, she said, "I was forced to drink blood out of a glass and eat human flesh."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2003 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Fortuneteller Sabrina Mitchell looks into her crystal ball and sees trouble ahead. Supervisors here passed a controversial new law last week to license a much-maligned industry that offers psychic solutions and cosmic guidance to customers, from lonely hearts to those obsessed with their futures. The ordinance applies to a broad range of practitioners, such as tarot card and palm readers and those who practice Chinese I-Ching and those who decipher Turkish coffee grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2006 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
It's often said of academics, but for J. Gordon Melton it's true: He really does have an encyclopedic mind. After all, Melton is the author of the Encyclopedia of American Religions, the Encyclopedia of Occultism and Parapsychology and the Encyclopedia of Religious Phenomena. Then, for fun, there's "The Vampire Book: The Encyclopedia of the Undead." "It's my little niche," Melton said. Actually, it's a big niche.
WORLD
April 30, 2004 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
In a small room, well away from the street so that no one hears the screams, Father Gabriele Amorth does battle with Satan. He is a busy man. As the Vatican's top exorcist, Amorth performs the mysterious, ancient ritual dozens of times a week. A confused world engulfed in tragedy and chaos is turning increasingly to black magic, the occult and fortune-telling, he said, proof that the devil and his handmaidens are having a field day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2003 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Fortuneteller Sabrina Mitchell looks into her crystal ball and sees trouble ahead. Supervisors here passed a controversial new law last week to license a much-maligned industry that offers psychic solutions and cosmic guidance to customers, from lonely hearts to those obsessed with their futures. The ordinance applies to a broad range of practitioners, such as tarot card and palm readers and those who practice Chinese I-Ching and those who decipher Turkish coffee grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2002 | From Associated Press
Prosecutors here have opened an investigation into whether the "Harry Potter" series of children's books incites religious hatred, an official said. The investigation was started at the request of a Moscow woman who was upset by the novels, said Svetlana Petrenko, a spokeswoman for the Moscow city prosecutor's office. Petrenko gave no further details on the complaint.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2000 | HUGH HART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Dracula is back. So is Count Orlock. And Lestat. Plus Nick the slacker and Queen Akasha and Jeri Ryan as a bloodsucking concubine. Call them what you will, dress them in jeans or tuxedos or gowns with plunging necklines, vampires are once again in the air, swarming their way to darkened cinemas this Christmas season and well into next year. Not that they've ever really gone away.
MAGAZINE
January 24, 1999 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, Paul Lieberman, a Times staff writer, last wrote on Doris Duke and her butler for the magazine. Times researcher Tere Petersen also contributed to this article
James Van Praagh promises us one hell of a heaven. It's a place with forests and flowers and lakes and boats, and beautiful mansions, too. It's a place where the aged return to their prime and where the young, struck down too soon, can grow into theirs. It's a place where amputees find their limbs restored and those blown to bits in a plane crash become whole again. OK, heavy smokers may still be battling their addiction and the mentally ill may need some counseling.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1988 | JAY SHARBUTT, Times Staff Writer
Long on efforts to shock but short on ads, Geraldo Rivera's NBC special on Satanism went to ratings heaven, national audience estimates from A.C. Nielsen Co. showed Wednesday. "Devil Worship: Exposing Satan's Underground" won its two-hour time period Tuesday night with a 21.9 rating and a 33 share of audience--meaning it was seen in about 19.8 million homes, one-third of the number that were watching TV between 8 and 10 p.m.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In testimony reminiscent of a horror novel, a woman and her 11-year-old daughter told a Superior Court jury Thursday that they had been tortured, sexually abused and forced to drink human blood during satanic rituals in secret caves. The woman, 48, who claims to have developed at least 10 personalities as a result of the abuse, and her 35-year-old sister, have filed a civil lawsuit in Superior Court in Orange County against their 76-year-old mother.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any day J. Gordon Melton reports for work, California's off-kilter image is in capable hands. People who know the state well could argue that Melton, a writer and editor for Gale publishing company, isn't inventing anything. He's just keeping track of what goes on all around him. Given his interests, that includes new religions, old cults and a fascination with vampires.
NEWS
October 30, 1998 | MICHAEL QUINTANILLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They're armed with otherworldly warrior-type gadgets and gizmos--magnetometers, infrared lights, computerized cameras and mega temperature gauges. Larry Montz and his high-tech team don't travel light. But hey, who else you gonna call when you hear things that go bump in the night? Your mommy? For nearly all his adult life, Montz--a modern-day ghost buster with a team of paranormal researchers, including psychics, channelers and clairvoyants--has been getting the goods on ghosts.
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