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BUSINESS
November 15, 2007 | Molly Selvin, Times Staff Writer
In what may be the first action of its kind, California workplace safety regulators have charged that the duties performed by housekeepers at a hotel -- scrubbing, bed making, vacuuming -- violate the state's repetitive-motion rules. A citation issued late last month by the Division of Occupational Safety and Health identified eight infractions at the Hilton Los Angeles Airport hotel.
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NEWS
December 6, 1985
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued revisions in the 7-year-old regulation that protects more than 170,000 workers in textile and other industries from the effects of cotton dust. The revisions, which stem largely from the Reagan Administration's commitment to deregulation, reduce some of the standard's worker-protection requirements. However, the changes in the regulation "guarantee the continuation of the necessary protections," Labor Secretary William E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2007 | Sara Lin and Jonathan Abrams, Times Staff Writers
The U.S. Forest Service failed to follow a series of safety protocols before five federal firefighters died in an arson-set wildfire near Palm Springs in October, according to a report released Thursday by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The federal labor agency found six "serious" health and safety violations that put the firefighters in peril by "exposing them to hazardous conditions of a burnover," the report says. The crew of Engine Co.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Labor Department proposed regulations designed to reduce tuberculosis cases among employees in such high-risk work sites as hospitals, prisons and homeless shelters. Respirators and routine medical testing for the highly contagious and sometimes fatal disease are among requirements the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is recommending for 5 million workers at 100,000 sites.
SPORTS
October 26, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The light tower that collapsed and killed a worker at the Olympic stadium in Atlanta last spring was carrying four times the weight it was designed to because an engineer miscalculated the weight of the lights. Investigators with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration reached that conclusion in their report on the March 20 death of a worker, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
OSHA, Accrediting Group in Pact: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration and a health-care accrediting organization, the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, have signed an agreement designed to make the health-care industry safer for workers. Workplace illness and injury rates are higher in hospitals and long-term-care facilities than in any other type of health-care organization, the commission's president said.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2001 | LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government has withdrawn a sweeping ban on workplace smoking that was proposed during the Clinton administration but languished in the face of tobacco industry opposition. Noting that nearly 70% of U.S. employees work in smoke-free environments, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration said the move had the support of major anti-smoking organizations, including the American Heart Assn., the American Cancer Society and the American Lung Assn.
NEWS
March 3, 2001 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accelerating their bid to wipe Clinton administration regulations off the books, Republicans are taking aim at a major target: new rules forcing employers to provide ergonomics programs that Democrats and labor unions say bolster workplace safety. If the GOP effort is successful, union officials say, it would mark the first time since the federal government created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in 1970 that Congress has nullified an existing job safety regulation.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2000 | Washington Post
The Clinton administration is expected to issue a final rule today requiring virtually all the nation's employers to create programs to protect workers from the repetitive stress strains and pain of the workplace. The sweeping new standard, eight years in the making, is the most costly ever to come out of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. It will cover 6 million workplaces and more than 100 million workers in nearly every line of business.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2000 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Amid outcries from business groups and conservatives fearing the government might start poking around workers' homes, U.S. Labor Secretary Alexis M. Herman on Wednesday withdrew a directive that employers are responsible for health and safety problems in home offices.
NEWS
November 23, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Labor Department proposed new regulations Monday to protect an estimated 27 million U.S. workers from repetitive stress injuries, but the suggested standards were relaxed in an effort to placate a hostile business community. Labor Secretary Alexis M.
NEWS
November 22, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Occupational Safety and Health Administration will take the first step to require many employers to provide work spaces and equipment to support the physical makeup of each individual doing his job, a proposal that could cover an estimated 27 million people who work at computers, on assembly lines or at other jobs that require either repetitive motions or heavy lifting.
NEWS
April 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court blocked enforcement of a government program aimed at improving safety at about 12,500 relatively dangerous workplaces. The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration failed to provide adequate notice and enough time for public comment before instituting its cooperative-compliance program in 1997, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with an aging work force prone to back strains, sore wrists and stiff necks, federal regulators Friday announced a new effort to require that employers help workers avoid injury from heavy lifting, repetitive motion and long hours at awkward workstations. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration said it is pressing ahead with ergonomics rules that had been blocked for three years by congressional Republicans and business groups.
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