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Occupations

NEWS
July 28, 1995 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a ghost visiting a ghost town, Joe Kovach has returned. On a cloudy morning, he rides up to the seventh floor of the old Daily News building in Manhattan and wanders through the abandoned city room of a newspaper he helped run for 25 years. The silence is painful. Once, the place rattled and hummed, a nerve center wired into the heartbeat of New York. Now it's just empty space--58,000 square feet of memories.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 1997 | JENNIFER OLDHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What do manicurists, amusement park attendants and computer engineers have in common? They are among occupations Bureau of Labor Statistics' economists project to grow the fastest between 1994 and 2005. These fields, together with occupations expected to see the largest numerical gain in jobs, are dominated by professional positions and those in service industries. As a share of total nonfarm employment, services sector jobs accounted for 21.4% in 1983, increasing to 27.2% in 1994.
NEWS
October 28, 2003 | J. Michael Kennedy
If you're looking to be around for a while, working outdoors may not be the ticket to longevity. The three most dangerous jobs in the U.S. are wilderness occupations. Ranking one, two and three on the list are lumberjacking, commercial fishing and bush piloting in Alaska. According to figures compiled by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 118 loggers were killed last year and 71 commercial fishermen died on the job.
REAL ESTATE
July 30, 2006
A Top 10 list of workers by occupation who can't afford California homes was compiled recently by the Rural Community Assistance Corp. Based on income figures from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and California Assn. of Realtors home prices, the nonprofit ranked occupations that have incomes that make it tough to qualify for the mortgage needed for a median-priced home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1998
Most educators and business leaders agree that merely graduation from high school today is not enough to ensure economic success. To get a good job, students need at least a two- or four-year college degree. The U.S. Department of Education says that a college education will help students get and keep a better job, especially in an era when even a factory worker may need to be computer-savvy. A college degree also translates into higher earnings.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1988
Boy, have times changed. The romance of the sea and the adventure of the rugged frontier are now just distant, faded memories. In fact, according to "The Jobs Rated Almanac," seaman and cowboy, occupations that were once the backbone of our nation, rank near the bottom of the list in terms of job satisfaction and desirability. ("Book Rates Actuary as No. 1 Job," May 19.) On the other hand, jobs such as actuary, computer programmer and statistician rank at or near the top of the list.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
You're 18 years old, ambitious and ready to prepare for a career. Or maybe you're 30ish, sick of your current job and looking for something new. In either case, lots of lines of work sound interesting, but slaving away in a dead-end industry just won't cut it. You want something that's going to be hot, where the job security or the chances for promotions and pay increases are good. So what it comes down to is this: What fields are about to boom?
BUSINESS
June 24, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You can build corporate home pages on the Internet or sling hash at the local deli. You can set strategy as a top corporate executive or clean the floors of the office building at night. These are the kinds of dramatically divergent career paths that lie ahead for graduates in today's split-level economy. Mom was right: If you want to make money, go to college.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1991 | ROSANNE KEYNAN, Rosanne Keynan is a writer and editor in Los Angeles.
Career satisfaction, like marital bliss, needs nurturing, according to top career counselors. If you want happiness for years to come, don't take your career for granted, any more than you would your mate. Even before the romance of an initial career choice dulls, they advise, prepare to work on the relationship. How can you keep your career from becoming boring--or slipping away altogether during hard times? Have realistic expectations, they say. Plan for continual growth and change.
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