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Ocean Water

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1994 | FRANK MESSINA
County health officials are advising beach visitors to stay out of the ocean, particularly near storm drains and creek outlets, for up to three days. Following a rainstorm, bacteria levels increase significantly in coastal waters, said Robert E. Merryman, county environmental health director. Large amounts of debris flow into the ocean from storm drains and rivers after a heavy rainfall, Merryman said. The discharge often holds large amounts of bacteria that can be harmful to people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1994
I am very upset about the fact that Aliso Beach has had so many closures this summer because of sewage spills! Peripheral development, by dumping into the Aliso Creek basin, is destroying the pristine beauty of our shoreline. Even more devastating to our beaches would be the proposed San Joaquin Hills toll road. The accumulation of runoff from the storm drains of that superhighway would inundate Aliso Beach after each rain. As a taxpayer of Laguna Beach, I am opposed to supporting outside developers who continue using our shoreline as a dumping ground.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1994 | RUSS LOAR
Hundreds of Orange County residents on Saturday are expected to take part--both above and below the water line--in Coastal Cleanup Day, a statewide day of beach cleaning and environmental awareness that begins at 8 a.m. on most county beaches. In Laguna Beach, scuba divers will be scouring local reefs and kelp forests for underwater garbage. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. at seven local beaches, and organizers say it will be the largest coastline and underwater cleanup in city history.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Turning salty ocean water into drinkable, even tasty commercial beverages may transform two Newport Beach entrepreneurs into successful business owners. The founders of fledgling Seaborn Beverages Co. say their company will be the nation's first to make clear, carbonated and flavored water from seawater. The water is gathered near Santa Catalina Island, purified in Long Beach, then packaged in dark blue glass bottles under the "Seaborn" name.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | LEO SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You won't find Delia Gorey surfing off the Ventura County coast right after a storm. She prefers to wait at least 48 hours. Gorey's husband won't hit the waves for 72 hours after the rains. As far as the couple are concerned, these are strictly precautionary measures. "I've gotten sick from being out in storm water," said Delia Gorey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1993 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ritual begins in the parking lot. After the waves are sized up, and the last drop of hot coffee is gone, anticipation turns to dread as warm clothes are traded for the cold neoprene of a wet suit. Full wet suit. Booties. Gloves. Hood. It is a winter exercise played out hundreds of times by surfers in beach parking lots all over Southern California. It's almost like taking a page out of California philosophy. For where there are waves, there will be surfers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1992 | LOU CANNON, THE WASHINGTON POST
In this torrid desert playground where tourists pursue jackpots in shaded, cool casinos, Patricia Mulroy dreams about using the Pacific Ocean to water local lawns. Mulroy is general manager of the Las Vegas Valley Water District, which serves most of the metropolitan area's 850,000 permanent residents and the 20 million tourists who flock annually to this gambling center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1991 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rest assured, Isaac. Your 300-year-old law of gravity still holds water. Scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have confirmed Isaac Newton's formula for determining the effects of gravity, despite some theoretical physicists who argue that a mysterious "fifth force" of nature somehow counteracts or diminishes gravity. "We still haven't found a kink in Newton's law, even after hundreds of years of trying to," remarked Mark A. Zumberge, who, with John A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Officially, the purpose of the state Regional Water Quality Control Board's daylong public hearing Thursday was to hear testimony about whether San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station violates its federal pollutant discharge permit. But, in hours of testimony from Southern California Edison, the plant's operator, California Coastal Commission officials and several environmental groups, much of the debate seemed to focus narrowly on a single word: "significant."
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