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OPINION
April 5, 2013
Re "'Unusual mortality event,'" April 2 After reading the heartbreaking article about the demise of so many sea lion pups, I'd like to state what to me is an obvious cause of this "baffling" event. We are turning our oceans into toxic septic tanks filled with human waste and industrial pollutants, also known as poison. In a futile effort to feed an unsustainable global population growth, we are stripping the oceans of life, leaving dwindling fish populations that can't sustain the basic needs of the seals.
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TRAVEL
April 20, 2014 | By Christopher Reynolds
Kauai's Na Pali Coast is too rugged for roads, but it can be admired by land, sea and air. For some travelers, it is the most compelling part of the North Shore. Land options: The Kalalau Trail begins in Haena State Park, next to Kee Beach, at the end of Kuhio Highway. It's 11 miles each way, muddy and steep. The path, full of rocks and wayward roots, climbs slopes, dips to the beach and crosses five valleys. If you want to hike six or more miles of it, you'll need enough food and gear to camp at least one night, perhaps two or three.
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OPINION
October 9, 2012
Re "A sea change in ocean chemistry," Oct. 7 Secretary of Energy Steven Chu said in a 2009 interview with a Times reporter about climate change: "I don't think the American public has gripped in its gut what could happen. " But we will indeed feel the consequences of global warming in our gut. We've become accustomed to the surplus from the seas and an abundance of food in general, so when our preferred food sources succumb to acidification of the oceans, drought and fire on land and loss of farmland from unprecedented flooding, we'll start to sense climate change in our guts.
WORLD
April 19, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Authorities using a robotic submarine to look for wreckage of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 said Saturday they expect to complete the search of the “focused underwater area” in five to seven days. Shortly after officials decided Monday to deploy the U.S. Navy's Bluefin-21 robotic sub in the Indian Ocean, Navy representatives said the mission could take six weeks to two months as the unmanned vehicle crawled over the seabed, using sonar to map an area about as big as the city of Los Angeles.
OPINION
November 4, 2013 | By Mark Gold and Cara Horowitz
You've probably seen the images of dolphins caught in abandoned monofilament fishing nets, or of vast areas of plastic trash floating in remote waters of the Pacific, or of sea turtles consuming plastic bags that look remarkably like one of their favorite foods: jellyfish. Or perhaps, after a rainstorm, you've walked on a beach that resembled a landfill. Some 20 million tons of plastic pollution enters the oceans each year, and it's devastating the marine environment. Plastic litter is also costly.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
First "Microcosmos" examined the insect universe, then "Winged Migration" flew with birds and "Planet Earth" took us to the remotest corners of the world. So it is no shock that the visual splendors of "Oceans" are up next, reaching theaters, not by coincidence, on the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. But if the existence of a documentary that records the vastness and diversity of the ocean is hardly unexpected, what French filmmakers and "Winged Migration" veterans Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzard have achieved is more surprising and more difficult than might be immediately apparent.
TRAVEL
February 19, 1995
The Atlantic and Indian oceans do not meet at Cape Town, South Africa, as stated by Christopher Reynolds, repeating a common error ("South Africa Calmly Awaits Acceptance by U.S. Travelers," Jan. 29). Instead, they meet about 120 miles southeast of the Cape of Good Hope at Cape Agulhas, the southernmost point of Africa and hence of the Old World landmass. In contrast to the spectacular False Cape and Cape of Good Hope (when not fogbound as usual), Cape Agulhas is rather flat, with many rocks extending far south into the ocean, or oceans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1992
I don't want to complain, but thousands of people are dumping sewage in our ocean. It hurts the Earth and kills the animals. Ninety-five percent of the water on Earth is polluted. Just 5% left is freshwater. At least we can try to save that tiny 5%. Just put the sewage somewhere else. KIRSTEN HUBBARD Oxnard Editor's note: These Letters to the Editor come from E.L.M. Street School in Oxnard. E.L.M.--Educational Learning Magnet Intersession--is a new school in the Oxnard School District that offers 10-day sessions for students who are between terms in the all-year school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995
Wind and water--two of nature's most elemental forces--combine to produce one of Orange County's best-known attractions, the waves that reach its beaches. Three recent storms in widely separated locations have helped end a summer-long run of flat surf. Here's how, whence and why swells reach the beaches of Orange County. Storms That Send Us Swells Storms driving waves to Orange County beaches normally take place at three distant points.
SCIENCE
December 20, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tropical ocean waters have become dramatically saltier over the last 40 years, while oceans closer to Earth's poles have become fresher, scientists reported in the current issue of Nature. Earth's warming surface may be intensifying evaporation over oceans in the low latitudes -- raising salinity concentrations there -- and transporting more fresh-water vapor via the atmosphere toward Earth's poles, they said.
IMAGE
April 19, 2014 | By Janet Kinosian, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Documentary filmmaker Susan Rockefeller's eponymous ocean-inspired jewelry line is filled with treasures inspired by an overworked sea. Sea creatures carefully crafted in gold, silver and precious gems are the tools she uses to spotlight the plight of our world's oceans. Married to fellow sea-lover and philanthropist David Rockefeller Jr. in 2008, she launched the jewelry line on World Ocean Day in 2012. Her pieces ($190 to $16,600) use natural-colored cultured freshwater Honora Ming pearls and recycled metals.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By David Ng
John Luther Adams won the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for music for his composition "Become Ocean," an orchestral work that premiered last year with the Seattle Symphony, which commissioned the piece. "Become Ocean" is a sonic work that is intended to evoke the landscapes and waters of the Pacific Northwest. The piece will be performed at Carnegie Hall in New York next month with the Seattle Symphony, conducted by Ludovic Morlot. Adams, who is a resident of Alaska, studied at CalArts in the '70s and has had his music performed around the world.
WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - An Australian ship hunting for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has picked up two more transmissions similar to those of the jet's "black boxes," and the coordinator of the search said Wednesday the "pings" were helping to narrow the search area significantly. The vessel Ocean Shield, towing an acoustic detection device lent by the U.S. Navy, recorded pings of five and seven minutes' duration Tuesday afternoon and evening, said Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, who is coordinating the search efforts from Perth, Australia.
WORLD
April 5, 2014 | By Julie Makinen, This post has been updated with the latest developments.
BEIJING - With nearly a month of searching having turned up no definitive sign of missing Flight 370, Malaysia said Saturday it was overhauling the organization of its investigation and vowed to press on with efforts to find the jet. Meanwhile, China's state-run Xinhua news agency said a Chinese vessel in the Indian Ocean, the Haixun 01, had picked up a "pulse signal with a frequency of 37.5 kHz” - the same frequency as emitted by a plane's...
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Barbara Demick, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIJING - The search and rescue teams working off the west coast of Australia seeking the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 discovered what oceanographers have been warning: Even the most far-flung stretches of ocean are full of garbage. For the first time since the search focused on the southern Indian Ocean 10 days ago, the skies were clear enough and the waves calm, allowing ships to retrieve the "suspicious items" spotted by planes and on satellite imagery. But examined on board, none of it proved to be debris from the missing plane, just the ordinary garbage swirling around in the ocean.
WORLD
March 30, 2014 | By Barbara Demick, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
BEIJING -- The search and rescue teams working off the west coast of Australia seeking the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 discovered what oceanographers have been warning: Even the most far-flung stretches of ocean are full of garbage. For the first time since the search focused on the south Indian Ocean 10 days ago, the skies were clear enough and the waves calm, allowing ships to retrieve the “suspicious items” spotted by planes and on satellite imagery. But examined on board, none of it proved to be debris from the missing plane, just the ordinary garbage swirling around the ocean.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The world's oceans contain many more types of microorganisms than had been thought, scientists report. The study, reported in Monday's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found more than 20,000 species in a liter of seawater. "Microbiologists have formally described 5,000 microbial species. This study shows we have barely scratched the surface," said Mitchell Sogin of the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss, Los Angeles Times
Peering into the microscope, Alan Barton thought the baby oysters looked normal, except for one thing: They were dead. Slide after slide, the results were the same. The entire batch of 100 million larvae at the Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery had perished. It took several years for the Oregon oyster breeder and a team of scientists to find the culprit: a radical change in ocean acidity. The acid levels rose so high that the larvae could not form their protective shells, according to a study published this year.
SCIENCE
March 27, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have found a 20-foot whale that can dive an astonishing 1.8 miles beneath the ocean - a record for a mammal. The record was reported this week in the journal Plos One. The miraculous, extreme-diving whale is known as Cuvier's beaked whale ( Ziphius cavirostris) . Members of this species can be found in most oceans throughout the world, except for in the coldest arctic regions. To survive the immense pressure changes it faces as it moves down the water column, Cuvier's beaked whales have evolved lungs and a trachea that collapse completely in the depths of the ocean and then pop back open as the whale moves to the surface to breathe.
WORLD
March 21, 2014 | By Don Lee
KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia -- Despite better weather conditions Friday and the use of some of the world's most advanced surveillance aircraft, an Australian-led search operation came up empty on its second day of scouring the south Indian Ocean for possible debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Several military aircraft, a commercial jet and two merchant ships combed a large area about 1,500 miles off the coast of Perth, Australia, where two objects...
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