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OPINION
October 9, 2012
Re "A sea change in ocean chemistry," Oct. 7 Secretary of Energy Steven Chu said in a 2009 interview with a Times reporter about climate change: "I don't think the American public has gripped in its gut what could happen. " But we will indeed feel the consequences of global warming in our gut. We've become accustomed to the surplus from the seas and an abundance of food in general, so when our preferred food sources succumb to acidification of the oceans, drought and fire on land and loss of farmland from unprecedented flooding, we'll start to sense climate change in our guts.
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WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Julie Makinen
BEIJING - An Australian ship hunting for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has picked up two more transmissions similar to those of the jet's "black boxes," and the coordinator of the search said Wednesday the "pings" were helping to narrow the search area significantly. The vessel Ocean Shield, towing an acoustic detection device lent by the U.S. Navy, recorded pings of five and seven minutes' duration Tuesday afternoon and evening, said Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston, who is coordinating the search efforts from Perth, Australia.
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OPINION
April 5, 2013
Re "'Unusual mortality event,'" April 2 After reading the heartbreaking article about the demise of so many sea lion pups, I'd like to state what to me is an obvious cause of this "baffling" event. We are turning our oceans into toxic septic tanks filled with human waste and industrial pollutants, also known as poison. In a futile effort to feed an unsustainable global population growth, we are stripping the oceans of life, leaving dwindling fish populations that can't sustain the basic needs of the seals.
WORLD
March 31, 2014 | By Barbara Demick, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
BEIJING - The search and rescue teams working off the west coast of Australia seeking the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 discovered what oceanographers have been warning: Even the most far-flung stretches of ocean are full of garbage. For the first time since the search focused on the southern Indian Ocean 10 days ago, the skies were clear enough and the waves calm, allowing ships to retrieve the "suspicious items" spotted by planes and on satellite imagery. But examined on board, none of it proved to be debris from the missing plane, just the ordinary garbage swirling around in the ocean.
OPINION
November 4, 2013 | By Mark Gold and Cara Horowitz
You've probably seen the images of dolphins caught in abandoned monofilament fishing nets, or of vast areas of plastic trash floating in remote waters of the Pacific, or of sea turtles consuming plastic bags that look remarkably like one of their favorite foods: jellyfish. Or perhaps, after a rainstorm, you've walked on a beach that resembled a landfill. Some 20 million tons of plastic pollution enters the oceans each year, and it's devastating the marine environment. Plastic litter is also costly.
SCIENCE
September 19, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Scientists have done the math, and according to their calculations, life on Earth has 1.75 to 3.25 billion years left to thrive. And that's if a giant asteroid or a nuclear war doesn't finish us off first. Yes, there is a big difference between 1.75 billion and 3.25 billion years, but predicting the end of life on our planet is not an exact science, at least not yet. To arrive at that 1.5-billion-year doomsday spread, graduate student Andrew Rushby of the University of East Anglia in Britain created two slightly different equations that estimate the length of time Earth will remain in the "habitable zone" around the sun.  A planet is considered to be in the habitable zone when liquid water can exist on its surface.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
First "Microcosmos" examined the insect universe, then "Winged Migration" flew with birds and "Planet Earth" took us to the remotest corners of the world. So it is no shock that the visual splendors of "Oceans" are up next, reaching theaters, not by coincidence, on the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. But if the existence of a documentary that records the vastness and diversity of the ocean is hardly unexpected, what French filmmakers and "Winged Migration" veterans Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzard have achieved is more surprising and more difficult than might be immediately apparent.
TRAVEL
February 19, 1995
The Atlantic and Indian oceans do not meet at Cape Town, South Africa, as stated by Christopher Reynolds, repeating a common error ("South Africa Calmly Awaits Acceptance by U.S. Travelers," Jan. 29). Instead, they meet about 120 miles southeast of the Cape of Good Hope at Cape Agulhas, the southernmost point of Africa and hence of the Old World landmass. In contrast to the spectacular False Cape and Cape of Good Hope (when not fogbound as usual), Cape Agulhas is rather flat, with many rocks extending far south into the ocean, or oceans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1992
I don't want to complain, but thousands of people are dumping sewage in our ocean. It hurts the Earth and kills the animals. Ninety-five percent of the water on Earth is polluted. Just 5% left is freshwater. At least we can try to save that tiny 5%. Just put the sewage somewhere else. KIRSTEN HUBBARD Oxnard Editor's note: These Letters to the Editor come from E.L.M. Street School in Oxnard. E.L.M.--Educational Learning Magnet Intersession--is a new school in the Oxnard School District that offers 10-day sessions for students who are between terms in the all-year school system.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2009 | Jessica Guynn and John Johnson Jr.
Google finally put the world's oceans on the map. During a splashy presentation Monday at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, the Internet giant unveiled a feature in its Google Earth program that will allow users to swim through undersea canyons as deep as the Mariana Trench and encounter creatures like a critically endangered, prehistoric fish called the coelacanth.
WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan
The U.S. Navy dispatched its most technologically advanced search aircraft to an empty quarter of the Indian Ocean on Thursday to look for two large pieces of debris that may provide the first physical evidence in the investigation of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Experts were hopeful that the debris would not turn out to be another of the false leads and misinterpreted data that have dogged the investigation into why the Boeing 777 carrying 239...
WORLD
March 13, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - The search for elusive Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 shifted to waters around India based on suggestions the aircraft may have flown longer and farther than previously thought. After six days of fruitless searches in the Gulf of Thailand, near the original flight path from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, investigators are exploring theories that the plane flew as long as four hours after it lost contact with civilian radar at 1:30 a.m. Saturday. "An additional search area may be opened in the Indian Ocean, and we are consulting with international partners about the appropriate assets to deploy," White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Richie Duchon
The magnitude 6.9 earthquake that rattled Northern California on Sunday was the state's largest temblor in nearly a decade. But it caused no damage or injuries. That's because the quake was centered 50 miles off the coast of Eureka and occurred at a depth of "10 miles beneath the Pacific seabed," according to the U.S. Geological Survey. By the time the seismic energy reached the shore, it had dissipated significantly. The USGS said the North Coast felt only moderate to light shaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
What do you get when you combine Frank Ocean, Diplo and two former members of the Clash? A nifty new song -- and some Internet hype for a youth-attuned shoemaker. Released Monday as a free download , "Hero" is the latest installment in Converse's "Three Artists. One Song" promotion, which previously teamed Julian Casablancas, Pharrell Williams and Santigold, as well as Best Coast, Kid Cudi and Vampire Weekend's Rostam Batmanglij, among others. (Evidently this time the company is counting Mick Jones and Paul Simonon -- each of whom has built his own career since his days in the Clash -- as one artist.)
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Despite a wealth of technology, crews trying to find the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner must cover a large swath of the South China Sea that varies widely in depth and is subject to fast-moving currents that could carry debris more than 50 miles a day, experts say. The search for the missing Boeing 777 off the southern coast of Vietnam had yielded nothing by early Tuesday. Malaysian and Vietnamese authorities said they had yet to find anything linked to the airliner that carried 239 passengers and crew, and that the search area was being expanded and the operation "intensified.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
  A pregnant South Carolina woman who drove her three young children into the surf in a locked minivan said she wanted to take them to a better place, said authorities, who charged her Friday with three counts of attempted first-degree murder and three counts of child abuse. Ebony Wilkerson, 32, was arrested Friday and was being held without bond in the county jail , according to the Volusia County Sheriff's Office in Florida . She has been in the Halifax Health Medical Center undergoing a mental health evaluation for several days, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1995
Wind and water--two of nature's most elemental forces--combine to produce one of Orange County's best-known attractions, the waves that reach its beaches. Three recent storms in widely separated locations have helped end a summer-long run of flat surf. Here's how, whence and why swells reach the beaches of Orange County. Storms That Send Us Swells Storms driving waves to Orange County beaches normally take place at three distant points.
SCIENCE
December 20, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tropical ocean waters have become dramatically saltier over the last 40 years, while oceans closer to Earth's poles have become fresher, scientists reported in the current issue of Nature. Earth's warming surface may be intensifying evaporation over oceans in the low latitudes -- raising salinity concentrations there -- and transporting more fresh-water vapor via the atmosphere toward Earth's poles, they said.
SCIENCE
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The ocean doesn't just moderate temperatures and influence weather in some of the world's biggest cities; it also has the power to cleanse the air, new research suggests. At night, the sea surface can absorb and remove up to 15% of smog-forming nitrogen oxides that build up in polluted air in coastal cities like Los Angeles, according to a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Researchers at UC San Diego came to that conclusion after deploying scientific instruments at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier last year to measure the exchange of trace gases between the air and the sea. The conditions were just right one night in February when winds blew a polluted air mass from the Los Angeles Basin along the coast and toward the sea, allowing the researchers to track what happened to the nitrogen oxide gases as they swept across the surface of the sea. Tim Bertram, an atmospheric chemist at UCSD who conducted the research with graduate student Michelle Kim, said the measurements taken that night provided one of the first real-world answers to a long-standing question: To what extent does the ocean surface remove the ingredients of smog?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
U.S. government forecasters say odds are increasing that El Niño, an ocean-warming pattern that alters weather across the globe, will develop later this year. Conditions in the eastern tropical Pacific have shifted enough that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday activated its alert system to issue an official El Niño watch. The alert means that meteorologists now believe El Niño, a natural cycle that occurs every two to seven years, has a more than a 50% chance of forming by the summer or fall.
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