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WORLD
March 20, 2014 | By Ralph Vartabedian and W.J. Hennigan
The U.S. Navy dispatched its most technologically advanced search aircraft to an empty quarter of the Indian Ocean on Thursday to look for two large pieces of debris that may provide the first physical evidence in the investigation of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Experts were hopeful that the debris would not turn out to be another of the false leads and misinterpreted data that have dogged the investigation into why the Boeing 777 carrying 239...
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WORLD
March 13, 2014 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING - The search for elusive Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 shifted to waters around India based on suggestions the aircraft may have flown longer and farther than previously thought. After six days of fruitless searches in the Gulf of Thailand, near the original flight path from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, investigators are exploring theories that the plane flew as long as four hours after it lost contact with civilian radar at 1:30 a.m. Saturday. "An additional search area may be opened in the Indian Ocean, and we are consulting with international partners about the appropriate assets to deploy," White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By Mikael Wood
What do you get when you combine Frank Ocean, Diplo and two former members of the Clash? A nifty new song -- and some Internet hype for a youth-attuned shoemaker. Released Monday as a free download , "Hero" is the latest installment in Converse's "Three Artists. One Song" promotion, which previously teamed Julian Casablancas, Pharrell Williams and Santigold, as well as Best Coast, Kid Cudi and Vampire Weekend's Rostam Batmanglij, among others. (Evidently this time the company is counting Mick Jones and Paul Simonon -- each of whom has built his own career since his days in the Clash -- as one artist.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Richie Duchon
The magnitude 6.9 earthquake that rattled Northern California on Sunday was the state's largest temblor in nearly a decade. But it caused no damage or injuries. That's because the quake was centered 50 miles off the coast of Eureka and occurred at a depth of "10 miles beneath the Pacific seabed," according to the U.S. Geological Survey. By the time the seismic energy reached the shore, it had dissipated significantly. The USGS said the North Coast felt only moderate to light shaking.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Julie Makinen
BEIJING - Despite a wealth of technology, crews trying to find the missing Malaysia Airlines jetliner must cover a large swath of the South China Sea that varies widely in depth and is subject to fast-moving currents that could carry debris more than 50 miles a day, experts say. The search for the missing Boeing 777 off the southern coast of Vietnam had yielded nothing by early Tuesday. Malaysian and Vietnamese authorities said they had yet to find anything linked to the airliner that carried 239 passengers and crew, and that the search area was being expanded and the operation "intensified.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Michael Muskal
  A pregnant South Carolina woman who drove her three young children into the surf in a locked minivan said she wanted to take them to a better place, said authorities, who charged her Friday with three counts of attempted first-degree murder and three counts of child abuse. Ebony Wilkerson, 32, was arrested Friday and was being held without bond in the county jail , according to the Volusia County Sheriff's Office in Florida . She has been in the Halifax Health Medical Center undergoing a mental health evaluation for several days, officials said.
SCIENCE
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
The ocean doesn't just moderate temperatures and influence weather in some of the world's biggest cities; it also has the power to cleanse the air, new research suggests. At night, the sea surface can absorb and remove up to 15% of smog-forming nitrogen oxides that build up in polluted air in coastal cities like Los Angeles, according to a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Researchers at UC San Diego came to that conclusion after deploying scientific instruments at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography pier last year to measure the exchange of trace gases between the air and the sea. The conditions were just right one night in February when winds blew a polluted air mass from the Los Angeles Basin along the coast and toward the sea, allowing the researchers to track what happened to the nitrogen oxide gases as they swept across the surface of the sea. Tim Bertram, an atmospheric chemist at UCSD who conducted the research with graduate student Michelle Kim, said the measurements taken that night provided one of the first real-world answers to a long-standing question: To what extent does the ocean surface remove the ingredients of smog?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
U.S. government forecasters say odds are increasing that El Niño, an ocean-warming pattern that alters weather across the globe, will develop later this year. Conditions in the eastern tropical Pacific have shifted enough that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday activated its alert system to issue an official El Niño watch. The alert means that meteorologists now believe El Niño, a natural cycle that occurs every two to seven years, has a more than a 50% chance of forming by the summer or fall.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2014 | By Maria L. LaGanga
SEATTLE - U.S. officials are heading to Greenland for a three-day meeting to persuade other Arctic nations to place a moratorium on high-seas fishing in the Arctic Ocean, where climate change is melting the permanent ice cap and allowing trawlers in for the first time in human history. The United States is proposing an agreement “that would close the international waters of the Arctic Ocean to commercial fishing until there is a good scientific foundation on which to base management of any potential fishing,” said David Benton, a member of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission, who will be part of the negotiations in Nuuk, Greenland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
SAN DIEGO - Above the water line, the Point Loma wharf at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography is impressive: large, high-tech ships dock there before cruising off to research sea life and climate conditions around the world. The skyline of downtown San Diego skyscrapers looms across the bay. Underwater, however, is a much less glamorous view of the concrete pier and wharf, with rotten and broken pilings, exposed rebar and dangling wooden supports. It is a glimpse, scientists say, of the worrisome decay that could threaten their efforts to better understand tsunamis, seismic faults and the effect of pollution on fish.
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