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July 4, 2009 | Paul Young
The video art exhibition "The Moving Image" is filling the Orange County Museum of Art with an array of sounds and bright lights, but on one recent Saturday, just a handful of visitors roamed the galleries. Among them was a young mother trying to keep her two sandy-haired boys, ages 5 and 7, from playing with the equipment. "Hey, what's that?" one of them shouted as he turned a corner. "It's a spaceship!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By David Ng
Dennis Szakacs, who has served as the director and chief executive officer of the Orange County Museum of Art since 2003, will be stepping down from his position at the end of the year, the museum announced on Thursday. Szakacs said in a statement sent by the museum that he is leaving OCMA to "explore new opportunities. " The museum said its board has formed a search committee and engaged the services of a search firm to find its next director and CEO. In a phone interview, Szakacs said that it was his decision to step down and that he is leaving because "I felt I had accomplished what I came to do. " He described the museum as being in good financial health.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
In terms of legacy, Calder is the Hemingway of the art world. His work is so popular, accessible and deceptively easy that the most au courant scholars tend to pass it over, and other artists don't always own up to its influence. "It's almost like Calder is invisible because he's so ubiquitous," says L.A.-based artist Jason Meadows, who used to walk by one of his massive public sculptures as a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. "When I was getting educated into the world of fine art, Abstract Expressionist painters were really hot and I got really charmed by Pop Art. Calder wasn't someone you would think about.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
More than 2,000 years ago, the Silk Road emerged as a network of flourishing trade routes between Asia and Europe, as well as parts of North and East Africa. Cultures crossfertilized. Civilizations prospered, others flamed out. Art recorded the complex new entanglements. For the next 4½ months, a modern Silk Road is passing through Southern California. This superhighway runs through the Orange County Museum of Art , where the 2013 California-Pacific Triennial is now on view.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
More than 2,000 years ago, the Silk Road emerged as a network of flourishing trade routes between Asia and Europe, as well as parts of North and East Africa. Cultures crossfertilized. Civilizations prospered, others flamed out. Art recorded the complex new entanglements. For the next 4½ months, a modern Silk Road is passing through Southern California. This superhighway runs through the Orange County Museum of Art , where the 2013 California-Pacific Triennial is now on view.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach has quietly sold 18 of its 20 California Impressionist paintings to an undisclosed private collector, sparking criticism from two local museum directors who say the secrecy violated the public interest by preventing them from bidding to keep the works in collections open to the public. The Times learned of the sale after a reader's tip on its Culture Monster arts blog. Reached Friday in Zurich, Switzerland, OCMA director Dennis Szakacs said the paintings from the early 1900s fetched a total of $963,000 in late March from a Laguna Beach collector whose identity the museum promised not to disclose.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2009 | Mike Boehm
Saying it was an "unexpected and uncollegial" move by Dennis Szakacs -- a museum director he likes and respects -- the veteran director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego has added his voice to a chorus of critics of the Orange County Museum of Art's quiet sale of 18 California Impressionist paintings to an anonymous private collector. And the chief curator of the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento has joined two small Orange County museums as institutions disappointed they didn't get to bid on OCMA's cache -- and hopeful of acquiring it if the buyer decides to donate or resell them.
OPINION
July 9, 2009
A questionable deal is a lot like art. No one can define it, but people know it when they see it. What everybody knows is that at least a couple of the paintings recently sold by the Orange County Museum of Art were stellar examples of California Impressionism. Yet no one except the museum's director and a few others know why they were sold so secretly, for such an apparently low price, or to whom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2000
Your Dec. 18 article "OCMA Revises Goals to Lure Chief Curator," regarding the Orange County Museum of Art having no chief curator for 15 months and changing and expanding its mission, had a sense of deja vu. One has to question the efficacy of the OCMA board's "professionalism" utilizing business practices of marketing art as a product, constantly changing mission statements and hiring headhunters. Might it be easier retaining staff if the focus was having an interest in and knowledge of art?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2005
IT was with dismay that I read "Provocateur Waters Charms the O.C." [by Christopher Reynolds, Oct. 31]. I felt very embarrassed for Orange County and the people attending the opening of the Orange County Museum of Art's "John Waters: Change of Life" exhibit. Does OCMA think that offering this exhibit makes the organization look hip and cool? I'm afraid the look achieved is actually sad and pathetic. OCMA should rethink allowing such exhibits as this to be displayed in its wonderful facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By David Ng
The Detroit Institute of Arts is in the midst of a debate over whether art from its collection can be sold off to cover city debt. At the center of the argument is whether the valuable paintings, sculptures and other works of art at the museum are city property or are part of the public trust and therefore can't be sold. A report in the Detroit Free Press stated that the city's emergency manager, Kevyn Orr, is considering selling objects from the museum to cover approximately $15 billion in debt.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Here's one tangible sign of the beneficial effect of Pacific Standard Time, the Getty-sponsored initiative to exhume the mostly under-recognized history of important Los Angeles art in the first generation after World War II: Southern California museums are now competing over the legacy. How high have the stakes quickly become? Let's just say the competition is so eager that it doesn't always mean a fair fight. One museum has publicly announced plans to organize a retrospective of a major but under-sung L.A. painter - even though officials knew that another museum already had the same show in the works for several months.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
In terms of legacy, Calder is the Hemingway of the art world. His work is so popular, accessible and deceptively easy that the most au courant scholars tend to pass it over, and other artists don't always own up to its influence. "It's almost like Calder is invisible because he's so ubiquitous," says L.A.-based artist Jason Meadows, who used to walk by one of his massive public sculptures as a student at the Art Institute of Chicago. "When I was getting educated into the world of fine art, Abstract Expressionist painters were really hot and I got really charmed by Pop Art. Calder wasn't someone you would think about.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng, Special to the Los Angeles Times
What's in a word? More meanings than we might assume, if we consider the myriad ways in which artists in the California Biennial explore the use and misuse of words. The exhibition, at the Orange County Museum of Art through March 13, includes about a dozen such examples out of more than 40 artists selected by museum curator Sarah Bancroft. "A lot of people think art is a visual experience, but it engages many senses," she says. "For me it's often an intellectual experience, and it seems very much natural that text and language would be incorporated into artwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2009
Sawyer increases ratings Diane Sawyer's debut last week as the new anchor of "World News" was low-key, but she still managed to lift ratings for the ABC evening newscast during a holiday week. "World News" averaged 8.56 million viewers during Sawyer's first week at the desk, 500,000 more than the broadcast's season-to-date average, according to Nielsen. (Because of the Christmas holiday, the data are based on just three days of ratings.) Sawyer kicked off her tenure on Dec. 21 with an exclusive interview with Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
OPINION
July 9, 2009
A questionable deal is a lot like art. No one can define it, but people know it when they see it. What everybody knows is that at least a couple of the paintings recently sold by the Orange County Museum of Art were stellar examples of California Impressionism. Yet no one except the museum's director and a few others know why they were sold so secretly, for such an apparently low price, or to whom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1985 | BILL FARR, Times Staff Writer
Three physicians specializing in cosmetic surgery are seeking $8.6 million damages from the Orange County Medical Assn. in a federal court lawsuit charging that the OCMA's refusal to list them as board certified specialists has unfairly damaged their practices. Drs. H. Geroge Brennan of Newport Beach and Frederick Berkowitz and Michael Elam, who operate offices together in both Newport Beach and Anaheim, filed the suit Thursday in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1992
Your series on cosmetic surgery has been well written and fair to the medical profession. I was, however, sorry to see Drs. George Brennan and Michael Elam depicted as spokesmen for cosmetic surgeons. They were plaintiffs in a suit against the Orange County Medical Assn. five years ago, which has been consistently misrepresented in your newspaper. The OCMA has long offered a referral service to the public providing names and addresses of physician members by specialty and location.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2009 | Mike Boehm
The Orange County Museum of Art sold 18 California Impressionist paintings to an unnamed collector for $963,000. Was that a fair price, or a bonanza for the buyer? Some critics of the private sale say the art would have sold for at least twice as much at a public auction. "Silver and Gold" by Granville Redmond is the prize of the collection. Here is how the museum, and experts who specialize in California Impressionists, assessed its value.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2009 | Paul Young
The video art exhibition "The Moving Image" is filling the Orange County Museum of Art with an array of sounds and bright lights, but on one recent Saturday, just a handful of visitors roamed the galleries. Among them was a young mother trying to keep her two sandy-haired boys, ages 5 and 7, from playing with the equipment. "Hey, what's that?" one of them shouted as he turned a corner. "It's a spaceship!"
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