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NEWS
November 7, 1989 | from Associated Press
Actress Bette Davis left her daughters and grandsons out of her nearly $1- million estate, according to a will filed for probate Monday. The bulk of the estate is split between her son and a close friend. Davis, who died on Oct. 6 of cancer at age 81, had been estranged from her daughter, Barbara Davis Hyman of Charlottesville, Va., since Hyman's book, "My Mother's Keeper," was published in 1985.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strong expression of support for building the next generation of military jets at Palmdale's Plant 42, California's entire congressional delegation has signed a letter asking the Department of Defense to compare production costs there with costs at any other facility. The contract to build the Joint Strike Fighter could be worth up to $750 billion over 25 years and is expected to generate thousands of new jobs in the region where it is built. The Oct.
SPORTS
November 1, 2009 | SAM FARMER
A future Hall of Fame quarterback donning the uniform of a bitter enemy and coming back to face his old team . . . Can you imagine? Troy Aikman can. Because it almost happened with him. Seven years ago -- back when Brett Favre was firmly entrenched as the leader of the Green Bay Packers -- Aikman, a Dallas Cowboys icon, almost came out of retirement to play for the hated Philadelphia Eagles. Aikman, now a Fox color analyst who will be in the booth for today's Vikings-Packers game, said nothing he can recall is quite like this homecoming.
NEWS
September 26, 1985
Joseph P. Zeronian, deputy superintendent of the Pasadena Unified School District and one-time acting superintendent, will leave the district Oct. 11 to enter private business. He will become vice president in charge of public finance for Prudential-Bache Securities in Los Angeles. Zeronian's departure is expected to have a major impact on the administration of the district, where he has held key positions for more than a decade. Supt. Phillip B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uninvited visitors have wormed their way into Hawthorne's kitchens and bathrooms. A minor infestation of bloodworms--larvae of the gnat-like midge--is forcing the city to purge its municipal water system, which serves about half of Hawthorne's 12,000 households and businesses. The scarlet creatures, although unnerving to residents who have been finding them in their water glasses and bathtubs since last week, do not pose a health hazard, officials say.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force is quietly seeking a legal way to move its Ballistic Systems Division out of San Bernardino, The Times has learned, even though Congress enacted a law earlier this year specifically saying that it should remain at its present location.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission said Thursday that it has charged two executives of American Telephone & Telecommunications Corp. with fraud for selling securities in the firm that purportedly was set up to offer long-distance telephone service via the Internet. The company is not related to telecommunications giant AT&T Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Allan Grant, a Life magazine photographer who got the last photo shoot with Marilyn Monroe weeks before her death and the first pictures of Marina Oswald just hours after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, has died. He was 88. Grant died Feb. 1 of Parkinson's-related pneumonia at his home in Brentwood, according to his wife, Karin.
MAGAZINE
November 10, 1991 | Mark Stuart Gill, Mark Stuart Gill is a writer living in Los Angeles. His last article for this magazine was "Losing It in Fat City."
THE MOUSE FORMULA The threat was delivered to Hal Z. Lederman's attorney: "Inform your client that if he continues to steal the formula, I'm not just going to sue, I'm going to take drastic action." It came from one Robert Murphy. Lederman, the marketing mastermind behind a hair-growth product called the Helsinki Formula, didn't let it bother him. He had been getting the same message for months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An NBC attorney attempted Friday to persuade federal appeals court judges in Pasadena to strike down the largest libel verdict against an American news organization--a $5.3-million judgment that the network defamed singer Wayne Newton in newscasts that linked him to organized crime figures. NBC lawyer Floyd Abrams said the stories were the product of aggressive reporting, not ill will, and should be protected by the First Amendment. But Newton's lawyer, Morton R.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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