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BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission said Thursday that it has charged two executives of American Telephone & Telecommunications Corp. with fraud for selling securities in the firm that purportedly was set up to offer long-distance telephone service via the Internet. The company is not related to telecommunications giant AT&T Corp.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Allan Grant, a Life magazine photographer who got the last photo shoot with Marilyn Monroe weeks before her death and the first pictures of Marina Oswald just hours after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, has died. He was 88. Grant died Feb. 1 of Parkinson's-related pneumonia at his home in Brentwood, according to his wife, Karin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An NBC attorney attempted Friday to persuade federal appeals court judges in Pasadena to strike down the largest libel verdict against an American news organization--a $5.3-million judgment that the network defamed singer Wayne Newton in newscasts that linked him to organized crime figures. NBC lawyer Floyd Abrams said the stories were the product of aggressive reporting, not ill will, and should be protected by the First Amendment. But Newton's lawyer, Morton R.
SPORTS
September 25, 1991 | STEVE ANDERSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Alamitos officials have proposed 1992 racing dates that would shorten the current quarter horse meeting but provide quarter horse racing at Hollywood Park for the first time since 1987. The proposal was presented Monday to a California Horse Racing Board Committee. It asks for 32 weeks of quarter horse racing, 43 weeks of harness racing and three weeks of thoroughbred and quarter horse fair racing. Under the plan, quarter horse racing would end at Los Alamitos on Jan. 18 instead of Feb. 8.
NEWS
September 11, 1994 | KARREN MILLS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When the fire came, some hid in wells or cisterns. They died. Some escaped to a swamp, and they suffocated. But others survived, boarding trains to outrace the flames or wading into water to avoid their reach. One hundred years ago, on Sept. 1, 1894, a firestorm swept over 480 square miles of northeastern Minnesota's white pine forest. In just four hours, six towns were reduced to rubble and the forest to a wasteland of charred stumps. And in that time, at least 418 people died.
SPORTS
May 1, 1997 | ROBYN NORWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What did the Detroit Red Wings ever do to Ron Wilson? Well, they fired his father, Larry Wilson, as coach in 1977. They fired his Uncle Johnny too, in 1973. Then there was the time they told Ron's father he'd be playing in the minors for a few games. "Two weeks of conditioning," Ron remembers, still incredulous. "It ended up being 13 years." And all that was long before the Red Wings beat the Mighty Ducks in the first game in franchise history--smoking the Ducks, 7-2, on Oct.
NEWS
June 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A World War II German submarine containing the remains of more than 50 sailors and spies has been found four miles east of Cape Cod, where the U.S. Navy sank it in 1944, a commercial diver said. Edward Michaud said he found the U-boat in 41 feet of water, partly buried in shifting sand, on June 5 after three years of research. The 251-foot-long sub was sunk Oct. 28, 1944, after its commander used a Coast Guard radio frequency to communicate with Germany in code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1989 | TOM McQUEENEY
An ongoing weekend car swap at Fullerton College was ordered closed this week because it allegedly competed with car dealerships in an "inappropriate" manner. The Fullerton City Council voted 3-2 Tuesday to deny permission for CarFaire Inc. to continue operating a used-car swap meet on vacant parking lots on the community college campus. "The use of public land for this type of enterprise is inappropriate," City Councilman Don Bankhead said.
SPORTS
October 2, 1992 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after announcing his return to the NBA, Magic Johnson signed a one-year contract extension Thursday for the 1994-95 season believed to be worth a record $14.6, payable even if he does not play. That gives Johnson the largest single-season salary in team sports, and, considering the $2.5 million he will make each of the next two years, makes the next three seasons worth $19.6 million.
SPORTS
October 24, 1988 | Maryann Hudson
By the time Joey Sindelar was 12, he probably had played more golf than most will play in a lifetime. Instead of growing up with a basketball hoop on the garage, Sindelar had a putting green in his front yard, a golf course in the back, and a father intent on making little Joey a golfer.
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