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NEWS
July 8, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday cautioned consumers against using quinine for leg cramps, warning that the drug could cause severe side effects, including death. Quinine, sold in this country under the brand name Qualaquin, is approved for treatment of uncomplicated malaria, but has a long history of use as a remedy for leg cramps, especially at night. In many countries, it is sold over the counter. Studies have shown that it can reduce the incidence of cramps by one-third to one-half but that as many as one in every 25 users can suffer serious side effects.
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WORLD
December 27, 2013 | By David Zucchino
BAGRAM, Afghanistan - Faced with an epidemic of deadly roadside bombs in Iraq and Afghanistan, U.S. military officials ordered up a fleet of V-hulled 16-ton armored behemoths in 2007 to help protect American soldiers and Marines. At a cost of $1 million each, the ugly tan beasts known as MRAPS have saved countless lives and absorbed or deflected thousands of insurgent bomb blasts in teeming cities, desert flats and rutted mountain roadways. The lumbering vehicles are so beloved that soldiers have scrawled notes of thanks on their armor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2005 | Daryl Strickland, Times Staff Writer
Lamont Bentley, a promising actor who appeared in more than a dozen films and television shows but was best known for his role on the comedy series "Moesha," died early Wednesday in a car crash in Ventura County. He was 31. Bentley was traveling alone on the 118 Freeway near Simi Valley shortly after midnight when he headed for the Rocky Peak Fire Road offramp at a high speed, witnesses told authorities.
NEWS
September 26, 1985
Joseph P. Zeronian, deputy superintendent of the Pasadena Unified School District and one-time acting superintendent, will leave the district Oct. 11 to enter private business. He will become vice president in charge of public finance for Prudential-Bache Securities in Los Angeles. Zeronian's departure is expected to have a major impact on the administration of the district, where he has held key positions for more than a decade. Supt. Phillip B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1993 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Uninvited visitors have wormed their way into Hawthorne's kitchens and bathrooms. A minor infestation of bloodworms--larvae of the gnat-like midge--is forcing the city to purge its municipal water system, which serves about half of Hawthorne's 12,000 households and businesses. The scarlet creatures, although unnerving to residents who have been finding them in their water glasses and bathtubs since last week, do not pose a health hazard, officials say.
NEWS
November 17, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force is quietly seeking a legal way to move its Ballistic Systems Division out of San Bernardino, The Times has learned, even though Congress enacted a law earlier this year specifically saying that it should remain at its present location.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1999 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission said Thursday that it has charged two executives of American Telephone & Telecommunications Corp. with fraud for selling securities in the firm that purportedly was set up to offer long-distance telephone service via the Internet. The company is not related to telecommunications giant AT&T Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2008 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Allan Grant, a Life magazine photographer who got the last photo shoot with Marilyn Monroe weeks before her death and the first pictures of Marina Oswald just hours after the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, has died. He was 88. Grant died Feb. 1 of Parkinson's-related pneumonia at his home in Brentwood, according to his wife, Karin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An NBC attorney attempted Friday to persuade federal appeals court judges in Pasadena to strike down the largest libel verdict against an American news organization--a $5.3-million judgment that the network defamed singer Wayne Newton in newscasts that linked him to organized crime figures. NBC lawyer Floyd Abrams said the stories were the product of aggressive reporting, not ill will, and should be protected by the First Amendment. But Newton's lawyer, Morton R.
SPORTS
September 25, 1991 | STEVE ANDERSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Alamitos officials have proposed 1992 racing dates that would shorten the current quarter horse meeting but provide quarter horse racing at Hollywood Park for the first time since 1987. The proposal was presented Monday to a California Horse Racing Board Committee. It asks for 32 weeks of quarter horse racing, 43 weeks of harness racing and three weeks of thoroughbred and quarter horse fair racing. Under the plan, quarter horse racing would end at Los Alamitos on Jan. 18 instead of Feb. 8.
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