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Octagon House

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HOME & GARDEN
August 22, 2009 | SAM WATTERS
Along the Arroyo Seco Parkway from downtown Los Angeles to Pasadena is a collection of 19th century buildings saved from L.A.'s busy wrecking ball. At Heritage Square, which isn't a square, you'll find a house that isn't a rectangle. It's an octagon, built for a family in Pasadena. Long before Pete Seeger sang, "Little boxes on the hillside, little boxes made of ticky tacky," lamenting the eerie sameness of postwar development, architects and social progressives bemoaned that our houses looked alike.
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HOME & GARDEN
August 22, 2009 | SAM WATTERS
Along the Arroyo Seco Parkway from downtown Los Angeles to Pasadena is a collection of 19th century buildings saved from L.A.'s busy wrecking ball. At Heritage Square, which isn't a square, you'll find a house that isn't a rectangle. It's an octagon, built for a family in Pasadena. Long before Pete Seeger sang, "Little boxes on the hillside, little boxes made of ticky tacky," lamenting the eerie sameness of postwar development, architects and social progressives bemoaned that our houses looked alike.
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NEWS
May 29, 1986
Pasadena Heritage, a private preservation group, has made a last-minute request that the historic Octagon House not be moved to Los Angeles. The appeal came during fund-raising efforts to move the 93-year-old, eight-sided house to Heritage Square, an enclave of historic homes visible from the Pasadena Freeway in Highland Park. On May 13, Pasadena Heritage sent a letter to Heritage Square requesting that the home be left in Pasadena because it is "a historical treasure."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1990 | BETSY BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just off the Pasadena Freeway north of downtown, in sharp contrast to the tidy, historic village around it, an eight-sided house sits on wood and steel supports, four years after it was moved there to be refurbished and displayed. Time has not been kind to the Octagon House at Heritage Square Museum. Its paint is peeling. A window has cracked. A sash hangs open. Family disputes surely transpired under the home's cupola in the 93 years that it housed descendants of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1990 | BETSY BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just off the Pasadena Freeway north of downtown, in sharp contrast to the tidy, historic village around it, an eight-sided house sits on wood and steel supports, four years after it was moved there to be refurbished and displayed. Time has not been kind to the Octagon House at Heritage Square Museum. Its paint is peeling. A window has cracked. A sash hangs open. Family disputes surely transpired under the home's cupola in the 93 years that it housed descendants of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To watch Michael Winterbottom's audacious "The Claim" is to wish Cecil B. DeMille had the idea first of transposing Thomas Hardy's "The Mayor of Casterbridge" to Northern California two decades after the discovery of gold in 1848. The material would have been perfect for DeMille, for at heart it's a quintessential Victorian morality tale as well as an epic frontier saga.
NEWS
September 25, 1986 | ALLAN MANN
M any homes built during the last years of the 19th Century are viewed with affection today because of their intricate and ornate style. They stand as evidence of an era of minute detail and a sometimes mannerly society. Yet it was not always so. The typically Victorian, turn-of-the-century homes fell into disfavor in the 1920s and '30s as the cleaner, more modern look of Art Deco and Streamline Moderne took over.
TRAVEL
August 6, 1989 | CAROL BARRINGTON, Barrington is a Houston free-lance writer.
Of the 48,000 structures built during the glory years of Victorian architecture (1850-1915) in this city, about 8,000 survive with their historic facades intact--"painted ladies" rejuvenated into classy homes, hotels, restaurants, offices and shops. It has been estimated that an equal number await discovery and restoration, their antique charms hidden by face lifts performed in the 1940s and '50s.
REAL ESTATE
September 17, 1989 | SAM HALL KAPLAN
The featured attraction of most retail-and-restaurant mall dedications tends to be an entertainment industry celebrity or two, riding a horse, sitting in an open customized auto or cutting a ribbon. Surrounded by the obligatory local politicians, and competing with a booming band in the background, they stoically shake hands, sign autographs and smile, then leave as quickly as possible.
FOOD
December 26, 1999 | CHARLES E. OLKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Choosing the best wine ever is a fairly common game, but to tell you the truth, I never know what to say. I might be able to name my 50 favorites, but choosing just one is far too difficult. So when some of my Internet wine buddies started a thread called "Ten Best of the Millennium" the other day, I answered with 13 wines. Then I went back and added 10 more the next day. Wine is like that. The best wine is often the last great wine you tasted, or maybe the first.
NEWS
July 17, 1986 | MARY BARBER, Times Staff Writer
When Gilbert Longfellow came to Pasadena in 1893, the first thing he did was to build a house in an octagonal shape just like the one he left behind in Maine. Octagons never really caught on in the West, so the old Longfellow house on Allen Avenue became a rarity that was hardly noticed as an untended jungle slowly obscured it from view.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | ANNE Z. COOKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A museum devoted to Los Angeles of a century ago, when velvet and froufrou were de rigueur, doesn't seem like the place to pick up clues on rebuilding riot-torn neighborhoods or providing job training for the unemployed. But at the Heritage Square Museum in Highland Park, you can witness a partnership at work that does just that--and it's one that could be applied to other places where rebuilding is needed.
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